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I have unix timestamps from time zone X which is not known,

the current timestamp(now()) in TZ X is known 1275143019,

how to approach a javascript function so that it can generate the datetime in the users current TZ in the format 2010-05-29 15:32:35 ?

UPDATE

I'm not a unix timestamp expert,if unix timestamp is always the same in different TZ,

then I have to change the question a little,so that the current datetime in TZ X is known(like 2010-05-29 22:32:28),and the other datetime is also in this format,how to convert them to the user's TZ based on the difference between now() ?

UPDATE

Something strange from MySQL:

On server:

mysql> select now();
+---------------------+
| now()               |
+---------------------+
| 2010-05-29 18:34:30 | 
+---------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select UNIX_TIMESTAMP();
+------------------+
| UNIX_TIMESTAMP() |
+------------------+
|       1275143674 | 
+------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

On local:

mysql> select now();
+---------------------+
| now()               |
+---------------------+
| 2010-05-29 22:41:30 |
+---------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select UNIX_TIMESTAMP();
+------------------+
| UNIX_TIMESTAMP() |
+------------------+
|       1275144091 |
+------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

Why the difference between now() (2010-05-29 22:41:30-2010-05-29 18:34:30=6hours) and UNIX_TIMESTAMP() (1275144091 - 1275143674 = 417seconds) is not the same ?

share|improve this question
    
unix timespamp is always in UTC –  vava May 29 '10 at 14:29
3  
You've asked 500 questions and only accepted answers on half of them?!? –  Pointy May 29 '10 at 14:43
    
Don't hurry,this question is far from being solved yet. –  user198729 May 29 '10 at 14:47
1  
If the database server is a separate machine, then it's probably the case that the clocks are not correctly synchronized. –  Pointy May 29 '10 at 14:49
    
Do you mean that select UNIX_TIMESTAMP(); should be the same on server and local even though they're in different TZ? –  user198729 May 29 '10 at 14:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you instantiate a Date object, you can pass in a Unix-style "milliseconds since the epoch" time value:

var date = new Date(milliseconds);

That time value is interpreted as UTC. When you call toString on that date object, or use the getters for hour/minute/second, you get values in the local timezone at the client.

As noted by @vava in a comment, the milliseconds or seconds current time value you get back from Unix/Linux is always UTC to begin with, so your server can drop that value into a page and when it executes on the client, the right thing will happen.

edit — If you need to convert from local time on the server to local time at the client, you really need to get your server time in UTC, or at least know the UTC offset. From year/month/day hour/minute/second values you can set up a Javascript date with the "setUTCFoo" functions (where "Foo" if "FullYear", "Month", "Date", "Hour", "Minute", "Seconds", "Milliseconds").

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Reference/Global_Objects/Date

share|improve this answer
    
I need to take into account the difference of UTC of server/client time,even though it may be caused by clock or whatever. –  user198729 May 29 '10 at 15:17
    
Do you know how clocks work? –  Pointy May 29 '10 at 15:22
    
Are you serious that matters? –  user198729 May 29 '10 at 15:25
    
Well, for example, `22:41:30 - 18:34:30' is not a "7 hour" difference. It's a difference of 4 hours and 7 minutes. If your machines were simply in different time zones, then the time difference would be an even number of hours and no extra minutes. –  Pointy May 29 '10 at 15:30
    
Ok, I agree this may be a clock problem, but can be fixed if I can get current timestamp in javascript. –  user198729 May 29 '10 at 15:35

The difference between the select now(); commands is because of the timezone difference. The select UNIX_TIMESTAMP(); should be always the same on any two machines.

Why is then the 417 seconds differene? It is simple:

417 seconds ~= 7 minutes

22:41:30 - 18:34:30 = 7 minutes

Synchronize the clocks and the unix timestamps will be the same.

share|improve this answer
    
22:41:30 - 18:34:30 = 7 hours ,not minutes –  user198729 May 29 '10 at 15:06
    
Also,I've tried several different machines,their results of UNIX_TIMESTAMP() are all different,so I can't rely on this UTC timestamp. –  user198729 May 29 '10 at 15:07
    
If you can't rely on the timestamp, then none of this makes any sense at all. Fix your clocks. There's no API to tell you how wrong your clock is; it makes no sense. –  Pointy May 29 '10 at 15:21
    
But as you have seens in my post,there is difference in UTC timestamp practically, do you want me to just ignore it ? –  user198729 May 29 '10 at 15:24
    
If the clocks on your servers are wrong, you have to fix them. Otherwise there's no way to know what the real UTC time is. That seems so obvious. All the clocks on my network return the same time, to within a couple milliseconds of each other, because my machines (like any well-managed machine) use NTP to keep synchronized. –  Pointy May 29 '10 at 15:26

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