Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is what I've coded it up, and it appears to work.

window.onload = function() {
   var currentSpan = document.getElementById('current');

   var minute = 60000,
       hour = minute * 60,
       day = hour * 24,
       week = day * 7,
       month = week * 4,
       year = day * 365;
       var start = new Date(2009, 6, 1);

   setInterval(function() {

       var now = new Date();



       var difference = now - start;


       var years = Math.floor(difference / year),
           months = Math.floor((difference - (years * year)) / month),
           weeks = Math.floor((difference - (months * month + years * year)) / week),
           days = Math.floor((difference - (weeks * week + months * month + years * year)) / day);



   currentSpan.innerHTML = 'Since has passed: ' + years + ' years, ' + months + ' months, ' + weeks + ' weeks and ' + days + ' days';

   }, 500);

};

This seems to update my span fine, and all the numbers look correct.

However, the code looks quite ugly. Do I really need to set up faux constants like that, and then do all that math to calculate what I want?

It's been a while since I've worked with the Date object.

Is this the best way to do this?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could put those constants in an array and then just iterate through it:

function tdiff(utc) {
  var diff = new Date() - new Date(utc);
  var units = [
    1000 * 60 * 60 * 24 * 365,
    1000 * 60 * 60 * 24 * 28,
    1000 * 60 * 60 * 24 * 7,
    1000 * 60 * 60 * 24,
    1000 * 60 * 60,
    1000 * 60,
    1000
  ];

  var rv = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < units.length; ++i) {
    rv.push(Math.floor(diff / units[i]));
    diff = diff % units[i];
  }
  return rv;
}

Of course since months and years aren't always the same length, this isn't really that accurate, but I figure you realize that :-)

Also see this: http://timeago.yarp.com/ it's kind-of cool

share|improve this answer
    
Ah yep, I took into consideration it is not 100% accurate. Also, looks like a cool plugin, but I'm including this in a project without jQuery. Thanks for your answer +1 –  alex May 29 '10 at 15:50
    
Thanks for this! Your answer helped me create a secondsToString() function: stackoverflow.com/a/9220897/142225 –  skybondsor Feb 10 '12 at 0:08
add comment

You don't have to set up any constants, but if you need all those numbers (years, months, days, hours etc) I don't know of any other way it can be done.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.