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I am writing a recursive program which calculates the Ackermann function.

Here is the code:

public class Ackermann{

    public static long ackermann( long m,long n) {
        return
            (m==0)? n+1:
            (m>0 && n==0)? ackermann(m-1,1):
            (m>0 && n>0)? ackermann(m-1, ackermann(m,n-1));
    }


    public static void main(String[]args) {
        long m=4;
        long n=2;
        System.out.println(ackermann(m,n));
    }
}

But it shows me mistakes:

Ackermann.java:7: : expected
   (m>0 && n>0)? ackermann(m-1, ackermann(m,n-1));
                                                 ^
Ackermann.java:7: ';' expected
   (m>0 && n>0)? ackermann(m-1, ackermann(m,n-1));
                                                  ^
Ackermann.java:18: illegal start of expression
public static void main(String[]args){
^
Ackermann.java:18: ';' expected
public static void main(String[]args){
      ^
Ackermann.java:18: illegal start of expression
public static void main(String[]args){
              ^
Ackermann.java:18: ';' expected
public static void main(String[]args){
                       ^
Ackermann.java:18: ';' expected
public static void main(String[]args){
                                    ^
Ackermann.java:26: reached end of file while parsing
}
 ^
8 errors

How can this be fixed?

share|improve this question
    
Please learn to indent your code correctly, remove the whitespace and to post links as hyperlinks, not code. –  Pieter May 29 '10 at 16:01
    
and when you have your code running, you will find that a long is not long enough... –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen May 29 '10 at 16:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Simply use

public static long ackermann(long m, long n) {
  return (m==0)?
           n+1:
           (m>0 && n==0)?
             ackermann(m-1,1):
             ackermann(m-1, ackermann(m,n-1)); 
}

Your last ternary operator is useless, and wasn't even complete (missing the else part).

share|improve this answer
    
of course, it will simply overflow with the values you feed it in the main. –  tonio May 29 '10 at 16:28
    
This code will always fail when one or both inputs is negative (even if you had a stack of infinite size). –  danben May 29 '10 at 16:53
    
Right, negative arguments are not supported. The definition of the ackermann function is for non negative numbers, as stated in the wikipedia article. If you want users of this function to get a useful message, simply add if (m<0 || n<0) throw new IllegalArgumentException(); before the return statement. –  tonio May 29 '10 at 17:08

Java only supports this exact syntax conditional?true-statement:false-statement there is no syntax like conditional?true-statement out there.

So you should modify your code to something like this:

public static long ackermann( long m,long n){
return 
   (m==0)? n+1:
   (m>0 && n==0)? ackermann(m-1,1):
   (m>0 && n>0)? ackermann(m-1, ackermann(m,n-1)):0; 
}
share|improve this answer

Your third ternary if has no second option. And the construction itself might be valid after fixing that, it's ugly and a more verbose check would show you easily what you've done wrong. Rewrite your if's and realize you don't need three, the third option is just what remains when the two checks have failed.

Computing the Ackermann function isn't really useful by the way, it explodes for all m greater than 3. Your code will just overflow without producing any reasonable results.

share|improve this answer
    
Pieter what is optimal way to write it? –  dato datuashvili May 29 '10 at 16:05
    
@danben has provided a nice overview, I suggest you look at his implementation. –  Pieter May 29 '10 at 21:23

There is no expression for the case that (m>0 && n>0) is false

share|improve this answer

Your last ternary operation has no third operand.

(m>0 && n>0)? ackermann(m-1, ackermann(m,n-1));

Notice how there is a ? but no :.

Since you have covered all the cases, you might change this to return -1, or throw an Exception.

However, you might also implement this function more readably without using the ternary operator:

public static long ackermann(long m, long n) {
  if (m == 0) {
    return n+1;
  }
  if (m > 0 && n == 0) {
    return ackermann(m-1, 1);
  }
  if (m > 0 && n > 0) {
    return ackermann(m-1, ackermann(m, n-1));
  }
  // Something went wrong
  System.out.println("Invalid inputs: m and n cannot be negative");
  return -1;
}

More lines of code is not necessarily bad, and code golf is not necessarily good. Write your code such that you could come back to it in a year and be able to easily figure out what it was intended to accomplish.

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