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I have JavaScript that computes and injects HTML into my DOM for the Facebook "Like" function. I need to specify a "canonical" URL because the actual URL doesn't reflect all the DOM manipulations that have been made (driven by user activity on the Web "page").

Alas, Facebook's code doesn't use the URL I supply but the window.location value (which has #hash aspects that influence the page's presentation, but that aren't accessible to the server). Anyway... why is FB's code ignoring the URL I give to it?

I generate the HTML thus:

var html = '<iframe src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=' 
           + encodeURI(url) + 
           '&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=false&amp;width=100&amp;action=recommend&amp;font=arial&amp;colorscheme=light" style="border:none; overflow:hidden; width:270px; height:26px;"  allowTransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe>'
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

encodeURI is the wrong method here. It only encodes characters that are totally invalid to be in a URL at all; it leaves alone characters that may be in a URL but have a special meaning. So:

'?par1='+encodeURI('http://example/scr?par2=2&par3=3')

ends up as:

'?par1=http://example/scr?par2=2&par3=3'

and the & character acts as a parameter separator for the outer URL inside of the inner one, prematurely ending the URL parameter you were passing to Facebook.

For a query parameter name/value or a path part, the correct function is encodeURIComponent().

Also, you are creating invalid HTML by not escaping your ampersands in the attribute value. If you must create HTML in a string(*) you will need an HTML-encoder:

function encodeHtml(s) {
    return s.replace(/&/g, '&amp;').replace(/</g, '&lt;').replace(/"/g, '&quot;');
}

var fburl= (
    'http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php'+
    '?action=recommend&href='+encodeURIComponent(url)+
    '&layout=standard&show_faces=false&width=100&font=arial&colorscheme=light'
);
var html= (
    '<iframe src="'+encodeHtml(fburl)+'" '
    'allowTransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" '+
    'style="border:none; overflow:hidden; width:270px; height:26px;">'+
    '</iframe>'
);

(*: and normally I'd try to avoid that, preferring to use DOM methods to create element content, since then you don't have to worry about HTML-escaping.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the sharing your insights. I do use DOM methods to "inject" the HTML into the DOM. I believe the source of my troubles was in not using encodeURIComponent() to generate the fburl. – Zhami May 31 '10 at 13:30
    
(I was thinking of DOM methods like createElement and properties like iframe.src= fburl;. But yeah, the name of encodeURI is a bit misleading.) – bobince May 31 '10 at 14:03

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