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I understand that Tortoise and Hare's meeting concludes the existence of loop, but how does moving tortoise to beginning of linked list while keeping the hare at meeting place, followed by moving both one step at a time make them meet at starting point of cycle?

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10 Answers 10

up vote 34 down vote accepted

This is Floyd's algorithm for cycle detection. You are asking about the second phase of the algorithm -- once you've found a node that's part of a cycle, how does one find the start of the cycle?

In the first part of Floyd's algorithm, the hare moves two steps for every step of the tortoise. If the tortoise and hare ever meet, there is a cycle, and the meeting point is part of the cycle, but not necessarily the first node in the cycle.

When the tortoise and hare meet, we have found the smallest i (the number of steps taken by the tortoise) such that Xi = X2i. Let mu represent the number of steps to get from X0 to the start of the cycle, and let lambda represent the length of the cycle. Then i = mu + a*lambda, and 2i = mu + b*lambda, where a and b are integers denoting how many times the tortoise and hare went around the cycle. Subtracting the first equation from the second gives i = (b-a)*lambda, so i is an integer multiple of lambda. Therefore, Xi + mu = Xmu. Xi represents the meeting point of the tortoise and hare. If you move the tortoise back to the starting node X0, and let the tortoise and hare continue at the same speed, after mu additional steps the tortoise will have reached Xmu, and the hare will have reached Xi + mu = Xmu, so the second meeting point denotes the start of the cycle.

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@Jim lewis The meeting point will not be a starting point of course, but as I said shifting one of those two to beginning of linked list and moving both at same speed will make them meet at the starting point of cycle. –  Passionate programmer May 29 '10 at 19:45
    
Check out this page en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cycle_detection –  Passionate programmer May 29 '10 at 19:56
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@Jim Lewis It would be great if you could explain about how having i as multiple of loop length results to mu as distance between first meeting point and loop beginning. –  Passionate programmer May 30 '10 at 9:44
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@Passionate: Take mu steps from the start point to get to X_mu, the start of the cycle (by definition of mu). Then if you take i more steps, where i is a multiple of the cycle length, you end up back at the cycle start: X_mu + i = X_mu. But addition is commutative, so this is equivalent to taking i steps to get from the start to the first meeting point X_i, then mu additional steps to get back to X_mu, the start of the cycle. –  Jim Lewis May 30 '10 at 10:02
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I think there is a small problem in your proof. Since the meeting point i is at some point of the cycle, I think the equation should be i = mu + k + a*lambda and 2i = mu + k + b*lambda, where k is the number of step from cycle start to the meeting point. Subtracting both equations give the same result though. –  Ivan Z. Siu Feb 13 '13 at 5:49

Let me try to clarify the cycle detection algorithm that is provided at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cycle_detection#Tortoise_and_hare in my own words.

I refer to the figure drawing in my explanation.

How it works

Let's have a tortoise and a hare (name of the pointers) pointing to the beginning of the list with a cycle.

Let's hypothesize that if we move tortoise 1 step at a time, and hare 2 steps at a time, they will eventually meet at a point. Let's show that first of all this hypothesis is true.

The figure illustrates a list with a cycle. The cycle has a length of n and we are initially m steps away from the cycle. Also let's say that the meeting point is k steps away from the cycle beginning and tortoise and hare meets after a total of i steps.

The following 2 conditions must hold:

1) i = m + p * n + k

2) 2i = m + q * n + k

The first one says that tortoise moves i steps and in these i steps it first gets to the cycle. Then it goes through the cycle p times for some positive number p. Finally it goes over k more nodes until it meets hare.

A similar is true for hare. It moves 2i steps and in these 2i steps it first gets to the cycle. Then it goes through the cycle q times for some positive number q. Finally it goes over k more nodes until it meets tortoise.

Therefore,

2 ( m + p * n + k ) = m + q * n + k

=> 2m + 2pn + 2k = m + nq + k

=> m + k = ( q - 2p ) n

Among m, n, k, p, q, the first two are properties of the given list. If we can show that there is at least one set of values for k, q, p that makes this equation true we show that the hypothesis is correct.

One such solution set is as follows:

p = 0

q = m

k = m n - m

We can verify that these values work as follows:

m + k = ( q - 2p ) n

=> m + mn - m = ( m - 2*0) n

=> mn = mn.

For this set, i is

i = m + p n + k

=> m + 0 * n + mn - m = mn.

Of course, you should see that this is not necessarily the smallest i possible. In other words, tortoise and hare might have already met before many times. However, since we show that they meet at some point at least once we can say that the hypothesis is correct. So they would have to meet if we move one of them 1 step, and the other one 2 steps at a time.

Now we can go to the second part of the algorithm which is how to find the beginning of the cycle.

Cycle Beginning

Once tortoise and hare meet, let's put tortoise back to the beginning of the list and keep hare where they met (which is k steps away from the cycle beginning).

The hypothesis is that if we let them move at the same speed (1 step for both), the first time they ever meet again will be the cycle beginning.

Let's prove this hypothesis.

Let's first assume some oracle tells us what m is.

Then, if we let them move m + k steps, tortoise would have to arrive at the point they met originally (k steps away from the cycle beginning - see in the figure).

Previously we showed that m + k = (q - 2p) n.

Since m + k steps is a multiple of cycle length n, hare, in the mean time, would go through the cycle (q-2p) times and would come back to the same point (k steps away from the cycle beginning).

Now, instead of letting them move m + k steps, if we let them move only m steps, tortoise would arrive at the cycle beginning. Hare would go be k steps short of completing (q-2p) rotations. Since it started k steps in front of the cycle beginning, hare would have to arrive at the cycle beginning.

As a result, this explains that they would have to meet at the cycle beginning after some number of steps for the very first time (very first time because tortoise just arrived at the cycle after m steps and it could never see hare which was already in the cycle).

Now we know that the number of steps we need to move them until they meet turns out to be the distance from the beginning of the list to the cycle beginning, m. Of course, the algorithm does not need to know what m is. It will just move both tortoise and hare one step at a time until they meet. The meeting point has to be the cycle start and the number of steps must be the distance (m) to the cycle beginning. Assuming we know the length of the list, we can also, compute the length of the cycle of subtracting m from the list length.

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Thank you very much, very exhaustive explanation; I find it so much better than the selected answer. –  Denis Gorodetskiy Sep 6 '12 at 6:06
    
Brilliant answer! –  Cong Hui Apr 1 '13 at 1:58
    
I don't think so its true that when they meet that's the starting point see comment below : stackoverflow.com/a/19209858/1744146<br>; Please let me know If I am wrong –  MrA Oct 6 '13 at 14:22
    
Excellent explanation !! –  Jake Nov 25 '13 at 21:15
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mind blowing explanation... –  Sarkar Apr 16 at 6:34

it's very very simple .you can think in terms of relative speed, if the rabbit moves two nodes and tortoise moves one node.relative to tortoise rabbit is moving one node(assume tortoise at rest). so, if we move one node in circular linked list we are sure going to meet at that point again.

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Figure 1

At the time of the first collision, tortoise moved m+k steps as show above. Hare moves twice as fast as tortoise, meaning hare moved 2(m+k) steps. From these simple facts we can derive the following graph.

Figure 1

At this point, we move tortoise back to the start and declare that both hare and tortoise must move one step at a time. By definition, after m steps, tortoise will be at the start of the cycle. Where will hare be?

Hare will also be at the start of the cycle. This is clear from the second graph: When tortoise was moved back to the start, hare was k steps into his last cycle. After m steps, he will have completed the cycle (possibly more than once) and collided with tortoise.

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Okay so lets assume the hare and the tortoise meet at a point which is k steps away from the starting of the cycle, the number of steps before the cycle starts is mu and the length of the cycle is L.

So now at the meeting point ->

Distance covered by tortoise = mu + a*L + k - Equation 1

(Steps taken to reach the beginning of the cycle + steps taken to cover 'a' iterations of the cycle + k steps from the start of the cycle) (where a is some positive constant)

Distance covered by the hare = mu + b*L + k - Equation 2

(Steps taken to reach the beginning of the cycle + steps taken to cover 'b' iterations of the cycle + k steps from the start of the cycle) (where b is some positive constant and b>=a)

So the extra distance covered by the hare is = Equation 2 - Equation 1 = (b-a)*L

Please note that this distance is also equal to the distance of the tortoise from the starting point since the hare moves 2 times faster than the tortoise. This can be equated to 'mu+k' which is also the distance of the meeting point from the beginning if we do not include multiple traversals of the cycle.

Thus, mu + k = (b-a)*L

So mu steps from this point would lead back to the beginning of the cycle (since k steps from the start of the cycle have already been taken to reach the meeting point). This could happen in the same cycle or any of the subsequent cycles. Thus now if we move the tortoise to beginning of the linked list, it will take mu steps to reach the starting point of the cycle and the hare would take mu steps to also reach the beginning of the cycle and thus they would both meet at the starting point of the cycle.

P.S. Honestly, I had the same question as the original poster in my mind and I read the first answer, they did clear out a few things but I could not get to the final result clearly and so I tried to do it my own way and found it easier to understand.

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It is actually easy to prove that they both will meet at the starting point, if you consider the maths behind the meeting point.
Firstly let m denote the starting point of cycle in the linked list , and n denote the length of the cycle . Then for the hare and tortoise to meet , we have :

( 2*t - m )%n = (t - m) %n, where t = time (at t = 0 , both are at the start)

Stating this more mathematically :

(2*t - m - (t - m) ) = 0 modulo n , which implies , t = 0 modulo n 

so they will meet at time t which should be a multiple of length of cycle . This means that they meet at a location, which is (t-m) modulo n = (0-m) modulo n = (-m) modulo n .

So now coming back to the question , if you move one pointer from the start of the linked list , and another from the intersection point , after m steps we will have the hare (which is moving inside the cycle) come to a point which is ((-m) + m) modulo n = 0 modulo n which is nothing but the starting point of the cycle.So we can see that after m steps it comes to the start of the cycle and the tortoise will meet it there as it will traverse m steps from the start of the linked list.

As a side note ,we can also calculate the time of their intersection in this way : The condition t = 0 modulo n tells us that they will meet at a time which is a multiple of cycle length , and also t should be greater than m as they would meet in the cycle . So time taken will be equal to the first multiple of n which is greater than m .

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I don't think so its true that when they meet that's the starting point. But yes if the other pointer(F) was at the meeting point before , than that pointer will be at the end of the loop instead of the start of the loop and the pointer(S) which started from the start of the list it will end up at the start of the loop. for eg:

1->2->3->4->5->6->7->8->9->10->11->12->13->14->15->16->17->18->19->20->21->22->23->24->8

Meet at :16

Start at :8

public Node meetNodeInLoop(){



        Node fast=head;
        Node slow=head;

        fast=fast.next.next;
        slow=slow.next;

        while(fast!=slow){

            fast=fast.next;
            fast=fast.next;

            if(fast==slow) break; 

            slow=slow.next;
        }

        return fast;

    }

    public Node startOfLoop(Node meet){

        Node slow=head;
        Node fast=meet;

        while(slow!=fast){
        fast=fast.next;
        if(slow==fast.next) break;
        slow=slow.next;
        }

        return slow;
    }
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my explanation here - http://algohub.blogspot.in/2014/05/given-linked-list-containing-loop-find.html

i believe it is straightforward. pls let me know if any part is ambiguous

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2  
Please post the full answer here instead of just a link which may break in the future –  Leeor May 9 at 11:52

With all the above analysis, if you are a learn-by-example person, I tried to write up an short analysis and example that help explains the math everyone else attempted to explain. Here we go!

Analysis: If we have two pointers, one faster than the other, and move them along together, they will eventually meet again to indicate a cycle or null to indicate no cycle.

To find the starting point of the cycle: Let

1) m be the distance from head to the beginning of the cycle;

2) d be the number of nodes in the cycle;

3) p1 be the speed of the slower pointer;

4) p2 be the speed of the faster pointer, eg. 2 means steps through two nodes at a time.

Observe the following iterations:

 m = 0, d = 10:
 p1 = 1:  0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 // 0 would the start of the cycle
 p2 = 2:  0  2  4  6  8 10 12 14 16 18 20

 m = 1, d = 10:
 p1 = 1: -1  0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9
 p2 = 2: -1  1  3  5  7  9 11 13 15 17 19

 m = 2, d = 10:
 p1 = 1: -2 -1  0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8
 p2 = 2: -2  0  2  4  6  8 10 12 14 16 18

From the above sample data, we can easily discover that whenever the faster and the slower pointers meet, they are m steps away from the start of the cycle. To solve this, put the faster pointer back at the head and set its speed to the speed of the slower pointer. When they meet again, the node is the start of the cycle.

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I know there is already an accepted answer for this problem but I'll still try to answer in a fluid manner. Assume :

The length of the Path is 'X+B' where 'B' is the length of the looped path and X of the non looped path. 
    Speed of tortoise : v
    Speed of hare     : 2*v 
    Point where both meet is at a distance 'x + b - k' from the starting point.

Now, let the hare and the tortoise meet after time 't' from beginning.

Observations:

If, Distance traveled by the tortoise = v*t = x + (b-k) (say)

Then, Distance traveled by the hare = 2*v*t = x + (b - k) + b (since the hare has traversed the looped part once already)

Now, there meeting times are same.

=> x + 2*b - k = 2* (x + b - k)

=> x = k

This of course means that the length of the path that is not looped is same as the distance of the starting point of the loop from the point where both meet.

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You can't assume that the tortoise travelled exactly x+b-k by the time they meet. Also, I don't understand how you got x+2*b-k for the hare's distance. –  Plumenator Apr 22 '12 at 8:01
    
Because the hare would have traversed the looped part once already to have to met the tortoise.. I didn't explain it there :/ –  n0nChun Apr 29 '12 at 18:32

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