Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
 <div id="4591" >
            <input type="text" id="Title1" name="Title1"  value="a" />
            <input type="submit" name="button"  value="Save" /> </div>

<div id="4592" >
            <input type="text" id="Title2" name="Title2"  value="a" />
            <input type="submit" name="button"  value="Save" /> </div>

  <div id="4593" >
            <input type="text" id="Title3" name="Title3"  value="a" />
            <input type="submit" name="button"  value="Save" /> </div>

This is the copy paste version of the html source generated by the browser which is making it clear that i am generating the dynamic fields on the page. name in the textbox is the field in the database. After pressing the one of the save buttons how would i send the particular textbox name and value to the controller action to be updated.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Give your submit buttons a different name:

<div id="4591">
    <input type="text" id="Title1" name="Title1"  value="a" />
    <input type="submit" name="button4591" value="Save" />
</div>

<div id="4592">
    <input type="text" id="Title2" name="Title2"  value="a" />
    <input type="submit" name="button4592" value="Save" /> 
</div>

<div id="4593">
    <input type="text" id="Title3" name="Title3"  value="a" />
    <input type="submit" name="button4593" value="Save" /> 
</div>

And then in your controller action check the request parameters. You will see that a parameter with the name of the clicked button will be passed:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Index()
{
    string id = Request.Params
        .Cast<string>()
        .Where(p => p.StartsWith("button"))
        .Select(p => p.Substring("button".Length))
        .First();
    return View();
}
share|improve this answer
    
well certainly i would say a wonderful solution –  maz3tt May 30 '10 at 9:29
    
Very neat idea. +1 for doing this with Linq. Just one question: are both the id and name properties necessary, or would just one suffice? –  draconis Apr 13 '11 at 11:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.