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I have two tables A,B which are related to each other (simplified):

A:
+-------+---------+ 
| id    | type    | 
+-------+---------+ 
| 1     | apple   | 
| 2     | orange  | 
| 3     | banana  | 
+-------+---------+ 

B:
+-------+---------+-----------+ 
| id    | a_id    |  rank     |  
+-------+---------+-----------+  
| 1     | 1       |  9.9      |
| 2     | 1       |  7.7      |
| 3     | 2       |  3.3      |
| 4     | 2       |  8.8      |
| 5     | 2       |  1.1      |  
| 6     | 3       |  3.3      |
| 7     | 3       |  2.2      | 
| 8     | 1       |  0.0      | 
+-------+---------+-----------+   

What mysql query will return the following result?

Result
+-------+---------+-----------+ 
| id    | type    |  rank     |  
+-------+---------+-----------+  
| 1     | apple   |  0.0      | 
| 2     | orange  |  1.1      | 
| 3     | banana  |  2.2      | 
+-------+---------+-----------+ 

The rank that was inserted last in table B is picked (it's not MAX(rank)).

The rank in the result table needs to be picked from table B with the highest id.

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3  
It depends where did you get the rank in the result from. What is it? It seems to be max for some items and min for others. Please first explain what you expect. –  viraptor May 29 '10 at 22:53
    
Yes, I'm assuming there is a mistake in orage. Or is it intended? –  Daniel Vassallo May 29 '10 at 22:55
    
@Daniel: It's not a mistake - I put it there to make it clear that the result being picked is not MAX(rank) –  Yeti May 29 '10 at 23:00
    
You have Things in Table A and various possible ranks for Things in Table A. Based on what do you want to pick the matching row from Table B? –  Eric J. May 29 '10 at 23:06
1  
@Lost_in_code: I've updated my answer. Fits the test case now. Let me know if you need any clarifications. –  Daniel Vassallo May 29 '10 at 23:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

UPDATED

You may want to try joining with a subquery to get the MAX(id) for each a_id in table_b, and then INNER JOIN with table_b to get the rank:

SELECT   ta.id, 
         ta.type,
         tb.rank
FROM     table_a ta
JOIN     (
            SELECT   MAX(id) AS id, 
                     a_id
            FROM     table_b
            GROUP BY a_id
         ) sub_q ON (sub_q.a_id = ta.id)
JOIN     table_b tb ON (tb.id = sub_q.id)
ORDER BY ta.id;

Test case:

CREATE TABLE table_a (id int, type varchar(10));
CREATE TABLE table_b (id int, a_id int, rank decimal(2,1));

INSERT INTO table_a VALUES (1, 'apple');
INSERT INTO table_a VALUES (2, 'orange');
INSERT INTO table_a VALUES (3, 'banana');

INSERT INTO table_b VALUES (1, 1, 9.9);      
INSERT INTO table_b VALUES (2, 1, 7.7);       
INSERT INTO table_b VALUES (3, 2, 3.3);       
INSERT INTO table_b VALUES (4, 2, 8.8);      
INSERT INTO table_b VALUES (5, 2, 1.1);         
INSERT INTO table_b VALUES (6, 3, 3.3);       
INSERT INTO table_b VALUES (7, 3, 2.2);       
INSERT INTO table_b VALUES (8, 1, 0.0);      

Result:

+------+--------+------+
| id   | type   | rank |
+------+--------+------+
|    1 | apple  |  0.0 |
|    2 | orange |  1.1 |
|    3 | banana |  2.2 |
+------+--------+------+
3 rows in set (0.01 sec)
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So he's looking for the "most recent" rank (or at least the one with the highest ID)? –  Eric J. May 29 '10 at 23:11
    
Yes, it looks like it. –  Daniel Vassallo May 29 '10 at 23:12
    
@Daniel: Thanks! Can you explain these: t.id, t.type, sub_t1? –  Yeti May 29 '10 at 23:20
    
I've updated my answer with slightly more clear aliases. So you start with SELECT id, type FROM table_a. This will return the result set you wanted without the rank. Then we create a subquery SELECT MAX(id) AS id, a_id FROM table_b GROUP BY a_id. This builds a result-set that gives us the MAX(id) for each a_id. We give this sub query the alias sub_q and INNER JOIN our previous result-set with this subquery on (sub_q.a_id = ta.id). Now we know which row in table_b contains the rank for each type. So we INNER JOIN with table_b on (tb.id = sub_q.id) to get the rank. –  Daniel Vassallo May 29 '10 at 23:27
1  
@Daniel: Works like a charm. I will go with yours since it was the first answer :) –  Yeti May 30 '10 at 0:02
SELECT a.id,
       a.type,
       b1.rank
 FROM a,
      b b1
 WHERE b1.a_id = a.id
 AND NOT EXISTS( SELECT b2.id
                  FROM b AS b2
                 WHERE b2.a_id = a.id
                   AND b2.id > b1.id
               )
 ORDER BY a.type
share|improve this answer

What about this:

SELECT a.id, a.type, b.rank 
FROM tempa a, tempb b 
WHERE a.id = b.a_id 
  AND b.id = (
    SELECT MAX(b.id) 
    FROM tempb b 
    WHERE b.a_id = a.id
)
ORDER BY a.id;

Outputs:

1, apple, 9.50
2, orange, 1.10
3, banana, 5.50
share|improve this answer
    
This query outputted a bizarre result! –  Yeti May 29 '10 at 23:30
    
@Lost_in_code: what do you mean by bizarre? It outputs the result of the initial question, doesn't it? Of course, now that you changed the question, you invalidated my answer, but still, what do you mean by bizarre? –  Pascal Thivent May 29 '10 at 23:33
    
@Lost_in_code: It did work on the test case I defined in my answer. (substituting tempa for table_a and tempb for table_b. What result did you get? –  Daniel Vassallo May 29 '10 at 23:35
    
Sorry, no offense. It outputted a whole lot of extra rows, which didn't seem right. I changed the question, for better readability. Instead of 9.50,1.10,5.50 you will now see 0.0,1.1,2.2 - which would make no difference to the query (will re-check if I did something wrong) –  Yeti May 29 '10 at 23:38
    
@Lost_in_code: No problem, it's just that bizarre result doesn't say much about what you got. But indeed, the changes you made with the values shouldn't change the query, just the result. –  Pascal Thivent May 29 '10 at 23:42

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