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I have the date of several events expressed in milliseconds[1], and I want to know which events are inside the current week and the current month, but I can't figure out how to obtain the first day (day/month/year) of the running week and convert it to milliseconds, the same for the first day of the month.

[1]Since January 1, 1970, 00:00:00 GMT
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let's see some code ... –  miku May 30 '10 at 0:29
7  
How to get the first day of the month? It's the one numbered 1... –  Michael Mrozek May 30 '10 at 0:36
    
Yeah, but how to get the name of the 1st day of the month? –  Goran Horia Mihail Feb 11 at 19:39
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6 Answers

up vote 35 down vote accepted

This week in milliseconds:

// get today and clear time of day
Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
cal.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 0); // ! clear would not reset the hour of day !
cal.clear(Calendar.MINUTE);
cal.clear(Calendar.SECOND);
cal.clear(Calendar.MILLISECOND);

// get start of this week in milliseconds
cal.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, cal.getFirstDayOfWeek());
System.out.println("Start of this week:       " + cal.getTime());
System.out.println("... in milliseconds:      " + cal.getTimeInMillis());

// start of the next week
cal.add(Calendar.WEEK_OF_YEAR, 1);
System.out.println("Start of the next week:   " + cal.getTime());
System.out.println("... in milliseconds:      " + cal.getTimeInMillis());

This month in milliseconds:

// get today and clear time of day
Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
cal.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 0); // ! clear would not reset the hour of day !
cal.clear(Calendar.MINUTE);
cal.clear(Calendar.SECOND);
cal.clear(Calendar.MILLISECOND);

// get start of the month
cal.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 1);
System.out.println("Start of the month:       " + cal.getTime());
System.out.println("... in milliseconds:      " + cal.getTimeInMillis());

// get start of the next month
cal.add(Calendar.MONTH, 1);
System.out.println("Start of the next month:  " + cal.getTime());
System.out.println("... in milliseconds:      " + cal.getTimeInMillis());
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also need clear am_pm for start of a day cal.clear(Calendar.AM_PM); –  keshin Oct 23 '12 at 6:58
    
@keshin: True. I replaced the lines cal.clear(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY); with cal.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 0); like instructed in the javadoc of Calendar. –  COME FROM Dec 21 '12 at 6:41
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Attention!

while (calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) > calendar.getFirstDayOfWeek()) {
    calendar.add(Calendar.DATE, -1); // Substract 1 day until first day of week.
}

is good idea, but there is some issue: For example, i'm from Ukraine and calendar.getFirstDayOfWeek() in my country is 2 (Monday). And today is 1 (Sunday). In this case calendar.add not called.

So, correct way is change ">" to "!=":

while (calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) != calendar.getFirstDayOfWeek()) {...
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To get the first day of the month, simply get a Date and set the current day to day 1 of the month. Clear hour, minute, second and milliseconds if you need it.

private static Date firstDayOfMonth(Date date) {
   Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
   calendar.setTime(date);
   calendar.set(Calendar.DATE, 1);
   return calendar.getTime();
}

First day of the week is the same thing, but using Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK instead

private static Date firstDayOfWeek(Date date) {
   Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
   calendar.setTime(date);
   calendar.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, 1);
   return calendar.getTime();
}
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Can you give any suggestions on how to extract all days of the week where the selected date is present in? –  Rigorous implementation Nov 13 '13 at 10:04
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In this case:

// get today and clear time of day
Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
cal.clear(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY);  <---- is the current hour not 0 hour
cal.clear(Calendar.MINUTE);
cal.clear(Calendar.SECOND);
cal.clear(Calendar.MILLISECOND);

So the Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY returns 8, 9, 12, 15, 18 as the current running hour. I think will be better change such line by:

c.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY,0);

this way the day always begin at 0 hour

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The first day of week can be determined with help of java.util.Calendar as follows:

Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
calendar.clear();
calendar.setTimeInMillis(timestamp);
while (calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) > calendar.getFirstDayOfWeek()) {
    calendar.add(Calendar.DATE, -1); // Substract 1 day until first day of week.
}
long firstDayOfWeekTimestamp = calendar.getTimeInMillis();

The first day of month can be determined as follows:

Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
calendar.clear();
calendar.setTimeInMillis(timestamp);
while (calendar.get(Calendar.DATE) > 1) {
    calendar.add(Calendar.DATE, -1); // Substract 1 day until first day of month.
}
long firstDayOfMonthTimestamp = calendar.getTimeInMillis();

Pretty verbose, yes.


Java 7 will come with a much improved Date and Time API (JSR-310). If you can't switch yet, then you can as far use JodaTime which makes it all less complicated:

DateTime dateTime = new DateTime(timestamp);
long firstDayOfWeekTimestamp = dateTime.withDayOfWeek(1).getMillis();

and

DateTime dateTime = new DateTime(timestamp);
long firstDayOfMonthTimestamp = dateTime.withDayOfMonth(1).getMillis();
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Thanks a lot, I'm on development of my first Android app, on a completely new world, the world of Java, and i'd never heard about joda but i'm not sure about joda+android. Thanks again! –  cesarlinux May 30 '10 at 1:55
1  
You're welcome. Using JodaTime is just a matter of downloading the JAR and placing it in the classpath. As with every other "3rd party" library. –  BalusC May 30 '10 at 2:19
    
@cesar, where do you state in the question or in the tags that this is for Android? –  Paul Tomblin May 30 '10 at 10:32
2  
Though keep in mind that jodatime may turn your 30kb app into a 300kb app. –  flodin May 30 '10 at 10:54
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You should be able to convert your number to a Java Calendar, e.g.:

 Calendar.getInstance().setTimeInMillis(myDate);

From there, the comparison shouldn't be too hard.

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