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How to get reference count for an object

  • Is it possible to determine if a javascript object has multiple references to it?
  • Or if it has references besides the one I'm accessing it with?
  • Or even just to get the reference count itself?
  • Can I find this information from javascript itself, or will I need to keep track of my own reference counters.

Obviously, there must be at least one reference to it for my code access the object. But what I want to know is if there are any other references to it, or if my code is the only place it is accessed. I'd like to be able to delete the object if nothing else is referencing it.

If you know the answer, there is no need to read the rest of this question. Below is just an example to make things more clear.


Use Case

In my application, I have a Repository object instance called contacts that contains an array of ALL my contacts. There are also multiple Collection object instances, such as friends collection and a coworkers collection. Each collection contains an array with a different set of items from the contacts Repository.

Sample Code

To make this concept more concrete, consider the code below. Each instance of the Repository object contains a list of all items of a particular type. You might have a repository of Contacts and a separate repository of Events. To keep it simple, you can just get, add, and remove items, and add many via the constructor.

var Repository = function(items) {
  this.items = items || [];
}
Repository.prototype.get = function(id) {
  for (var i=0,len=this.items.length; i<len; i++) {
    if (items[i].id === id) {
      return this.items[i];
    }
  }
}
Repository.prototype.add = function(item) {
  if (toString.call(item) === "[object Array]") {
    this.items.concat(item);
  }
  else {
    this.items.push(item);
  }
}
Repository.prototype.remove = function(id) {
  for (var i=0,len=this.items.length; i<len; i++) {
    if (items[i].id === id) {
      this.removeIndex(i);
    }
  }
}
Repository.prototype.removeIndex = function(index) {
  if (items[index]) {
    if (/* items[i] has more than 1 reference to it */) {
      // Only remove item from repository if nothing else references it
      this.items.splice(index,1);
      return;
    }
  }
}  

Note the line in remove with the comment. I only want to remove the item from my master repository of objects if no other objects have a reference to the item. Here's Collection:

var Collection = function(repo,items) {
  this.repo = repo;
  this.items = items || [];
}
Collection.prototype.remove = function(id) {
  for (var i=0,len=this.items.length; i<len; i++) {
    if (items[i].id === id) {
      // Remove object from this collection
      this.items.splice(i,1);
      // Tell repo to remove it (only if no other references to it)
      repo.removeIndxe(i);
      return;
    }
  }
}

And then this code uses Repository and Collection:

var contactRepo = new Repository([
    {id: 1, name: "Joe"},
    {id: 2, name: "Jane"},
    {id: 3, name: "Tom"},
    {id: 4, name: "Jack"},
    {id: 5, name: "Sue"}
  ]);

var friends = new Collection(
  contactRepo,
  [
    contactRepo.get(2),
    contactRepo.get(4)
  ]
);

var coworkers = new Collection(
  contactRepo,
  [
    contactRepo.get(1),
    contactRepo.get(2),
    contactRepo.get(5)
  ]
);

contactRepo.items; // contains item ids 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 
friends.items;  // contains item ids 2, 4
coworkers.items;  // contains item ids 1, 2, 5

coworkers.remove(2);

contactRepo.items; // contains item ids 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 
friends.items;  // contains item ids 2, 4
coworkers.items;  // contains item ids 1, 5

friends.remove(4);

contactRepo.items; // contains item ids 1, 2, 3, 5 
friends.items;  // contains item ids 2
coworkers.items;  // contains item ids 1, 5

Notice how coworkers.remove(2) didn't remove id 2 from contactRepo? This is because it was still referenced from friends.items. However, friends.remove(4) causes id 4 to be removed from contactRepo, because no other collection is referring to it.

Summary

The above is what I want to do. I'm sure there are ways I can do this by keeping track of my own reference counters and such. But if there is a way to do it using javascript's built-in reference management, I'd like to hear about how to use it.

share|improve this question
    
If deletion is your only purpose, the the GC is the thing for this mission. He will/should do exactly what you described. –  Itay Moav -Malimovka May 30 '10 at 0:48
1  
@Itay: I want to remove an item from a Repository when no Collection instances refer to it. So regular garbage collection won't work here, because the item still exists in the Repository. I must know if an object is still in use somewhere, which is why I have created a repository object to contain references to all in-use objects. –  Tauren May 30 '10 at 0:55
    
Then you need to write a global function that will replace the = operator and inside it build a....reference table? And you would also need to write some kind of garbage collector. Can all be done in JS. Although I wonder if all this is really necessary. What do you care if you have "forgotten objects"? –  Itay Moav -Malimovka May 30 '10 at 2:08
    
@Itay: Thanks, didn't think about overloading =, but not sure I'd go that route. I realize this may sound overly complex, but I have a requirement that wherever a data element is shown on the UI must accurately reflect the actual value. So if I have the same contact shown 3 times, if a change happens to one, the others must change instantly as well. I'm building an event driven system to do this, but am finding I need to make sure all UI elements are bound to the same data model and it would be easiest if I could track reference counts. –  Tauren May 30 '10 at 19:29
    
Your question is very important, anyone knows any debugger that can display this kind of infromation? Chrome Debugger and Firebug do not. Having it on the debugger is better than not knowing at all. –  Hoffmann Sep 27 '12 at 14:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

No, no, no, no; and yes, if you really need to count references you will have to do it manually. JS has no interface to this, GC, or weak references.

Whilst you could implement a manual reference-counted object list, it's questionable whether all the extra overhead (in performance terms but more importantly code complexity) is worth it.

In your example code it would seem simpler to forget the Repository, use a plain Array for your lists, and let standard garbage collection take care of dropping unused people. If you needed to get a list of all people in use, you'd just concat the friends and coworkers lists (and sort/uniquify them if you needed to).

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for your feedback. I was afraid there wasn't a native javascript way to do this. I realize this may seem like a lot of excess bloat, but I'm working with an extremely large application, and this was an overly simplified example. In the appl, keeping track all the different friends, coworkers and other related arrays is near impossible. Plus, there are many different types of objects, not just contacts. So having a repository for each type will actually make things simpler. This all relates to a databinding solution that triggers events whenever models change. –  Tauren May 30 '10 at 2:18
1  
You know if there is any way to get the reference count on a debugger(like firebug or chrome web inspector) –  Hoffmann Sep 27 '12 at 15:02

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