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If I want to check for the existance of a single file, I can test for it using test -e filename or [ -e filename ].

Supposing I have a glob and I want to know whether any files exist whose names match the glob. The glob can match 0 files (in which case I need to do nothing), or it can match 1 or more files (in which case I need to do something). How can I test whether a glob has any matches? (I don't care how many matches there are, and it would be best if I could do this with one if statement and no loops (simply because I find that most readable).

(test -e glob* fails if the glob matches more than one file.)

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11 Answers 11

up vote 72 down vote accepted

The nullglob shell option is indeed a bashism.

To avoid the need for a tedious save and restore of the nullglob state, I'd only set it inside the subshell that expands the glob:

if test -n "$(shopt -s nullglob; echo glob*)"
then
    echo found
else
    echo not found
fi

For better portability and more flexible globbing, use find:

if test -n "$(find . -maxdepth 1 -name 'glob*' -print -quit)"
then
    echo found
else
    echo not found
fi

Explicit -print -quit actions are used for find instead of the default implicit -print action so that find will quit as soon as it finds the first file matching the search criteria. Where lots of files match, this should run much faster than echo glob* or ls glob* and it also avoids the possibility of overstuffing the expanded command line (some shells have a 4K length limit).

If find feels like overkill and the number of files likely to match is small, use stat:

if stat -t glob* >/dev/null 2>&1
then
    echo found
else
    echo not found
fi
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5  
find seems to be exactly correct. It has no corner cases, since the shell isn't doing expansion (and passing an unexpanded glob to some other command), it's portable between shells (though apparently not all of the options you use are specified by POSIX), and it's faster than ls -d glob* (the previous accepted answer) becasue it stops when it reaches the first match. –  Ken Bloom Nov 24 '10 at 14:54
    
Note that this answer may require a shopt -u failglob as these options seem to conflict somehow. –  Calimo Jul 30 at 13:42
    
The find solution will match a filename with no glob characters as well. In this case, that's what I wanted. Just something to be aware of though. –  jnylen Aug 19 at 14:33
#!/usr/bin/env bash

# If it is set, then an unmatched glob is swept away entirely -- 
# replaced with a set of zero words -- 
# instead of remaining in place as a single word.
shopt -s nullglob

M=(*px)

if [ "${#M[*]}" -ge 1 ]; then
    echo "${#M[*]} matches."
else
    echo "No such files."
fi
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1  
To avoid a possible false “no matches” set nullglob instead of checking to see if a single result equals the pattern itself. Some patterns can match names that are exactly equal to the pattern itself (e.g. a*b; but not e.g. a?b or [a]). –  Chris Johnsen May 30 '10 at 4:00
    
I suppose this fails on the highly unlikely chance that there's actually a file named like the glob. (e.g. somebody ran touch '*py'), but this does point me in another good direction. –  Ken Bloom May 30 '10 at 4:01
    
Thank you for your input - i adjusted my version. –  miku May 30 '10 at 4:06
    
I like this one as the most general version. –  Ken Bloom May 30 '10 at 16:11

I like

exists() {
    [ -e "$1" ]
}

if exists glob*; then
    echo found
else
    echo not found
fi

This is both readable and efficient (unless there are a huge number of files). The main drawback is that it's much more subtle than it looks, and I sometimes feel compelled to add a long comment. If there's a match, "glob*" is expanded by the shell and all the matches are passed to exists(), which checks the first one and ignores the rest. If there's no match, "glob*" is passed to exists() and found not to exist there either.

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2  
It may return a false positive if the glob is something like *.[cC] (there may be not c or C file, but a file called *.[cC]) or false negative if the first file expanded from that is for instance a symlink to an unexistent file or to a file in a directory you don't have access to (you way want to add a || [ -L "$1" ]). –  Stephane Chazelas Jun 13 '13 at 20:39

test -e has the unfortunate caveat that it considers broken symbolic links to not exist. So you may want to check for those, too.

function globexists {
  test -e "$1" -o -L "$1"
}

if globexists glob*; then
    echo found
else
    echo not found
fi
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(ls glob* &>/dev/null && echo Files found) || echo No file found
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Would also return false if there are directories matching glob* and for instance you don't have the write to list those directories. –  Stephane Chazelas Jun 13 '13 at 20:42

To simplify The MYYN's answer somewhat, based on his idea:

M=(*py)
if [ -e ${M[0]} ]; then
  echo Found
else
  echo Not Found
fi
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2  
Close, but what if you are matching [a], have a file named [a], but no file named a? I still like nullglob for this. Some might view this as pedantic, but we might as well be as fully correct as is reasonable. –  Chris Johnsen May 30 '10 at 6:15

Based on flabdablet's answer, for me it looks like easiest (not necessarily fastest) is just to use find itself, while leaving glob expansion on shell, like:

find /some/{p,long-p}ath/with/*globs* -quit &> /dev/null && echo "MATCH"

Or in if like:

if find $yourGlob -quit &> /dev/null; then
    echo "MATCH"
else
    echo "NOT-FOUND"
fi
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This works exactly like the version I already presented using stat; not sure how find is "easier" than stat. –  flabdablet Aug 1 at 0:41
1  
Be aware that &> redirection is a bashism, and will quietly do the wrong thing in other shells. –  flabdablet Aug 1 at 0:42

This abomination seems to work:

#!/usr/bin/env bash
shopt -s nullglob
if [ "`echo *py`" != "" ]; then
    echo "Glob matched"
else
    echo "Glob did not match"
fi

It probably requires bash, not sh.

This works because the nullglob option causes the glob to evaluate to an empty string if there are no matches. Thus any non-empty output from the echo command indicates that the glob matched something.

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You should use if [ "`echo *py`" != "*py"] –  yegle Feb 22 at 6:09
1  
That would not work correctly if there was a file called *py. –  Ryan Thompson Feb 22 at 10:28
    
If there's no file end with py, `echo *py` will be evaluate to *py. –  yegle Feb 22 at 16:00
1  
Yes, but it will also do so if there is a single file called *py, which is the wrong result. –  Ryan Thompson Feb 22 at 19:55
    
Correct me if I'm wrong, but if there's no file that matches *py, your script will echo "Glob matched"? –  yegle Feb 23 at 4:32
if ls -d $glob > /dev/null 2>&1; then
  echo Found.
else
  echo Not found.
fi

Note that this can be very time cosuming if there are a lot of matches or file access is slow.

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1  
This will give the wrong answer if a pattern like [a] is used when the file [a] is present and the file a is absent. It will say “found” even though the only file it should match, a, is not actually present. –  Chris Johnsen May 30 '10 at 8:25
    
This version should work in an ordinary POSIX /bin/sh (without bashisms), and in the case that I'm need it for, the glob doesn't have brackets anyway, and I don't need to worry about cases that are terribly pathological. But I guess that there is no one good way to do test whether any files match a glob. –  Ken Bloom May 30 '10 at 16:11
#!/bin/bash
set nullglob
touch /tmp/foo1 /tmp/foo2 /tmp/foo3
FOUND=0
for FILE in /tmp/foo*
do
    FOUND=$((${FOUND} + 1))
done
if [ ${FOUND} -gt 0 ]; then
    echo "I found ${FOUND} matches"
else
    echo "No matches found"
fi
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2  
This version fails when precisely one file matches, but you can avoid the FOUND=-1 kludge by using the nullglob shell option. –  Ken Bloom May 30 '10 at 3:39
    
@Ken: Hmm, I would not call nullglob a kludge. Comparing a single result to the original pattern is a kludge (and prone to false results), using nullglob is not. –  Chris Johnsen May 30 '10 at 4:02
    
@Chris: I think you misread. I didn't call nullglob a kludge. –  Ken Bloom May 30 '10 at 4:08
    
@Ken: Indeed, I did misread. Please accept my apologies for my invalid criticism. –  Chris Johnsen May 30 '10 at 6:21

If you have globfail set you can use this crazy ( which you really should not )

shopt -s failglob # exit if * does not match 
( : * ) && echo 0 || echo 1

or

q=( * ) && echo 0 || echo 1
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