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Here's what I got so far (that doesn't work). At this point I thought my target was Ansi encoded, but I really don't want to have to know at this point. My browser seems to be able to determine what encoding to use, How can I?

static void GetUrl(Uri uri, string localFileName)
{
    HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(uri);
    HttpWebResponse response;

    response = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse();

    // Save the stream to file
    Stream responseStream = response.GetResponseStream();
    StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(responseStream, Encoding.Default);
    Stream fileStream = File.OpenWrite(localFileName);
    using (StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(fileStream, Encoding.Default))
    {
        sw.Write(reader.ReadToEnd());
        sw.Flush();
        sw.Close();
     }
}


After answers (currently only tested on a UTF-8 site):

static void GetUrl(Uri uri, string localFileName)
{
    HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(uri);
    HttpWebResponse response = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse();
    try
    {
        // Hope GetEncoding() knows how to parse the CharacterSet
        Encoding encoding = Encoding.GetEncoding(response.CharacterSet);
        StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream(), encoding);
        using (StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(localFileName, false, encoding))
        {
            sw.Write(reader.ReadToEnd());
            sw.Flush();
            sw.Close();
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        response.Close();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Does your edit mean you are doing it like I suggested? If so, you should move the "Acceped Answer" tick. – Tomalak Nov 16 '08 at 12:21
    
Actually, I thought about it, but I don't know the protocol here. As Lubos did suggest checking the charset in the content-type portion of the header. Lubos has additional info, but you're suggestion of converting utf-8 is pretty valuable too. I wish I could merge the answers. – CrashCodes Nov 18 '08 at 16:26
    
Lubos' answer led me to Encoding.GetEncoding(response.CharacterSet) before I even read your post; but your post had actually C# code. I upvoted both, left him with the answer for being the first to lead me to the answer, and I posted the revised code to show respect for your post and future readers. – CrashCodes Nov 18 '08 at 16:32
up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are three ways how web-browsers try to detect character encoding.

Look for (if it's HTML):

<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=US-ASCII">

or (for XHTML)

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>

or sometimes it's even specified in http header

Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1
share|improve this answer
    
I'm using the header information for the immediate situation. Encoding.GetEncoding(response.CharacterSet); This seems to do the trick for now. – CrashCodes Nov 16 '08 at 10:49

You should be looking for the encoding the server sends the response in. Encoding.Default does not cut the mustard here. :-)

Stream responseStream = response.GetResponseStream();
Encoding enc = Encoding.GetEncoding(response.CharacterSet);
StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(responseStream, enc);
Stream fileStream = File.OpenWrite(localFileName);
using (StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(fileStream, enc))
{  /* ... */ }

To be sure, you could convert everything to UTF-8 and store your file as UTF-8 always. That way you are never left with the need to guess the encoding when reading the file.

share|improve this answer

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