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How do I add a new method to an object "on the fly"?

$me= new stdClass;
$me->doSomething=function ()
 {
    echo 'I\'ve done something';
 };
$me->doSomething();

//Fatal error: Call to undefined method stdClass::doSomething()
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Is this specifically without using a class? –  tomwrong Jul 20 '11 at 7:42

6 Answers 6

up vote 37 down vote accepted

You can harness __call for this:

class Foo
{
    public function __call($method, $args)
    {
        if (isset($this->$method)) {
            $func = $this->$method;
            return call_user_func_array($func, $args);
        }
    }
}

$foo = new Foo();
$foo->bar = function () { echo "Hello, this function is added at runtime"; };
$foo->bar();
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2  
Very, very clever but kludgy in a real world project IMO! (and +1 to counter anonymous downvoter) –  Pekka 웃 May 30 '10 at 9:07
2  
@pekka - but how, exactly, is it kludgy? Sure, I'm not saying I'm an expert at extending an object during runtime in PHP, but I honestly can't say I see much wrong with it. (maybe I just have poor taste) –  karim79 May 30 '10 at 9:13
    
@karim It's just the general feeling that it's not what __call was intended for, and it might be in use otherwise already. I would feel uneasy using this from a coding style point of view. On the other hand, it is elegant, can be extended with error checks (like when $method doesn't exist) and could be defined in some core class somewhere and then passed on to all objects. –  Pekka 웃 May 30 '10 at 9:17
11  
I would add a is_callable check in that if as well (So you don't accidentally try to call a string). And also throw a BadMethodCallException() if you can't find a method, so you don't have it return and think it did return successfully. Also, make the first param of the function the object itself, and then do an array_unshift($args, $this); before the method call, so that the function gets a reference to the object without explicitly needing to bind it... –  ircmaxell May 30 '10 at 12:56
1  
This solution does not work on PHP 5.2 –  hamczu Mar 24 '12 at 23:29

Update: The approach shown here has a major shortcoming: The new function is not a fully qualified member of the class; $this is not present in the method when invoked this way. This means that you would have to pass the object to the function as a parameter if you want to work with data or functions from the object instance! Also, you will not be able to access private or protected members of the class from these functions.

Good question and clever idea using the new anonymous functions!

Interestingly, this works: Replace

$me->doSomething();    // Doesn't work

by call_user_func on the function itself:

call_user_func($me->doSomething);    // Works!

what doesn't work is the "right" way:

call_user_func(array($me, "doSomething"));   // Doesn't work

if called that way, PHP requires the method to be declared in the class definition.

Is this a private / public / protected visibility issue?

Update: Nope. It's impossible to call the function the normal way even from within the class, so this is not a visibility issue. Passing the actual function to call_user_func() is the only way I can seem to make this work.

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There's a similar post on stackoverflow that clears out that this is only achievable through the implementation of certain design patterns.

The only other way is through the use of classkit, an experimental php extension. (also in the post)

Yes it is possible to add a method to a PHP class after it is defined. You want to use classkit, which is an "experimental" extension. It appears that this extension isn't enabled by default however, so it depends on if you can compile a custom PHP binary or load PHP DLLs if on windows (for instance Dreamhost does allow custom PHP binaries, and they're pretty easy to setup).

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Here a simple class that allow to set anonymous function. It's an optimised class of https://gist.github.com/nickunderscoremok/5857846

<?php
class stdObject {
    public function __construct(array $arguments = array()) {
        if (!empty($arguments)) {
            foreach ($arguments as $property => $argument) {
                if ($argument instanceOf Closure) {
                    $this->{$property} = $argument;
                } else {
                    $this->{$property} = $argument;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public function __call($method, $arguments) {
        if (isset($this->{$method}) && is_callable($this->{$method})) {
            return call_user_func_array($this->{$method}, $arguments);
        } else {
            throw new Exception("Fatal error: Call to undefined method stdObject::{$method}()");
        }
    }
}

$person = new stdObject(array(
    "name" => "nick",
    "age" => 23,
    "friends" => array("frank", "sally", "aaron"),
    "sayHi" => function() {
        return "Hello there";
    }
));

$person->sayHi2 = function() {
    return "Hello there 2";
};

$person->test = function() {
    return "test";
};

var_dump($person->name, $person->test(), $person->sayHi2());
?>
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Using simply __call in order to allow adding new methods at runtime has the major drawback that those methods cannot use the $this instance reference. Everything work great, till the added methods don't use $this in the code.

class AnObj extends stdClass
{
    public function __call($closure, $args)
    {
        return call_user_func_array($this->{$closure}, $args);
    }
 }
 $a=new AnObj();
 $a->color="red";
 $a->sayhello=function(){ echo "hello!";}
 $a->printmycolor=function(){ echo $this->color;}
 $a->sayhello();//output: "hello!"
 $a->printmycolor();//ERROR: Undefined variable $this

In order to solve thi problem you can rewrite the pattern in this way

class AnObj extends stdClass
{
    public function __call($closure, $args)
    {
        return call_user_func_array($this->{$closure}->bindTo($this),$args);
    }

    public function __toString()
    {
        return call_user_func($this->{"__toString"}->bindTo($this));
    }
}

In this way you can add new methods that can use the instance reference

$a=new AnObj();
$a->color="red";
$a->sayhello=function(){ echo "hello!";}
$a->printmycolor=function(){ echo $this->color;}
$a->sayhello();//output: "hello!"
$a->printmycolor();//output: "red"
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To see how to do this with eval, you can take a look at my PHP micro-framework, Halcyon, which is available on github. It's small enough that you should be able to figure it out without any problems - concentrate on the HalcyonClassMunger class.

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I'm assuming (and so does my code) that you are running on PHP < 5.3.0 and thus need kludges and hacks to make this work. –  ivans May 30 '10 at 9:01
    
Asking if anyone would like to comment on the downvote is pointless, I suppose... –  ivans May 30 '10 at 9:08
    
It probably is, there is some mass downvoting going around here. But maybe you want to elaborate a bit on what you did? As you can see, this is an interesting question with no definite answer yet. –  Pekka 웃 May 30 '10 at 9:28

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