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Assuming I have a table containing the following information:

FK | Field1 | Field2
=====================
3  | ABC    | *NULL*
3  | *NULL* | DEF

is there a way I can perform a select on the table to get the following

FK | Field1 | Field2
=====================
3  | ABC    | DEF

Thanks

Edit: Fix field2 name for clarity

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4 Answers

Aggregate functions may help you out here. Aggregate functions ignore NULLs (at least that's true on SQL Server, Oracle, and Jet/Access), so you could use a query like this (tested on SQL Server Express 2008 R2):

SELECT
    FK,
    MAX(Field1) AS Field1,
    MAX(Field2) AS Field2
FROM
    table1
GROUP BY
    FK;

I used MAX, but any aggregate which picks one value from among the GROUP BY rows should work.

Test data:

CREATE TABLE table1 (FK int, Field1 varchar(10), Field2 varchar(10));

INSERT INTO table1 VALUES (3, 'ABC', NULL);
INSERT INTO table1 VALUES (3, NULL, 'DEF');
INSERT INTO table1 VALUES (4, 'GHI', NULL);
INSERT INTO table1 VALUES (4, 'JKL', 'MNO');
INSERT INTO table1 VALUES (4, NULL, 'PQR');

Results:

FK  Field1  Field2
--  ------  ------
3   ABC     DEF
4   JKL     PQR
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There are a few ways depending on some data rules that you have not included, but here is one way using what you gave.

SELECT
    t1.Field1,
    t2.Field2
FROM Table1 t1
    LEFT JOIN Table1 t2 ON t1.FK = t2.FK AND t2.Field1 IS NULL

Another way:

SELECT
    t1.Field1,
    (SELECT Field2 FROM Table2 t2 WHERE t2.FK = t1.FK AND Field1 IS NULL) AS Field2
FROM Table1 t1
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There might be neater methods, but the following could be one approach:

SELECT    t.fk,
          (
             SELECT t1.Field1 
             FROM   `table` t1 
             WHERE  t1.fk = t.fk AND t1.Field1 IS NOT NULL
             LIMIT  1
          ) Field1,
          (
             SELECT t2.Field2
             FROM   `table` t2 
             WHERE  t2.fk = t.fk AND t2.Field2 IS NOT NULL
             LIMIT  1
          ) Field2
FROM      `table` t
WHERE     t.fk = 3
GROUP BY  t.fk;

Test Case:

CREATE TABLE `table` (fk int, Field1 varchar(10), Field2 varchar(10));

INSERT INTO `table` VALUES (3, 'ABC', NULL);
INSERT INTO `table` VALUES (3, NULL, 'DEF');
INSERT INTO `table` VALUES (4, 'GHI', NULL);
INSERT INTO `table` VALUES (4, NULL, 'JKL');
INSERT INTO `table` VALUES (5, NULL, 'MNO');

Result:

+------+--------+--------+
| fk   | Field1 | Field2 |
+------+--------+--------+
|    3 | ABC    | DEF    |
+------+--------+--------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

Running the same query without the WHERE t.fk = 3 clause, it would return the following result-set:

+------+--------+--------+
| fk   | Field1 | Field2 |
+------+--------+--------+
|    3 | ABC    | DEF    |
|    4 | GHI    | JKL    |
|    5 | NULL   | MNO    |
+------+--------+--------+
3 rows in set (0.01 sec)
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I had a similar problem. The difference was that I needed far more control over what I was returning so I ended up with an simple clear but rather long query. Here is a simplified version of it based on your example.

select main.id, Field1_Q.Field1, Field2_Q.Field2
from 
(
    select distinct id
    from Table1
)as main
left outer join (
    select id, max(Field1)
    from Table1
    where Field1 is not null
    group by id
) as Field1_Q on main.id = Field1_Q.id
left outer join (
    select id, max(Field2)
    from Table1
    where Field2 is not null
    group by id
) as Field2_Q on main.id = Field2_Q.id 
;

The trick here is that the first select 'main' selects the rows to display. Then you have one select per field. What is being joined on should be all of the same values returned by the 'main' query.

Be warned, those other queries need to return only one row per id or you will be ignoring data

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