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What's the best way to merge 2 or more dictionaries (Dictionary<T1,T2>) in C#? (3.0 features like LINQ are fine).

I'm thinking of a method signature along the lines of:

public static Dictionary<TKey,TValue>
                 Merge<TKey,TValue>(Dictionary<TKey,TValue>[] dictionaries);

or

public static Dictionary<TKey,TValue>
                 Merge<TKey,TValue>(IEnumerable<Dictionary<TKey,TValue>> dictionaries);

EDIT: Got a cool solution from JaredPar and Jon Skeet, but I was thinking of something that handles duplicate keys. In case of collision, it doesn't matter which value is saved to the dict as long as it's consistent.

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55  
Unrelated, but for anyone looking to merge just two dictionaries without duplicate key checks, this works nicely: dicA.Concat(dicB).ToDictionary(kvp => kvp.Key, kvp => kvp.Value) –  Benjol Dec 14 '11 at 7:31
2  
@Benjol you could have added this in answer section –  M.Kumaran Sep 2 '13 at 13:54
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13 Answers

up vote 89 down vote accepted

This partly depends on what you want to happen if you run into duplicates. For instance, you could do:

var result = dictionaries.SelectMany(dict => dict)
                         .ToDictionary(pair => pair.Key, pair => pair.Value);

That will blow up if you get any duplicate keys.

EDIT: If you use ToLookup then you'll get a lookup which can have multiple values per key. You could then convert that to a dictionary:

var result = dictionaries.SelectMany(dict => dict)
                         .ToLookup(pair => pair.Key, pair => pair.Value)
                         .ToDictionary(group => group.Key, group => group.First());

It's a bit ugly - and inefficient - but it's the quickest way to do it in terms of code. (I haven't tested it, admittedly.)

You could write your own ToDictionary2 extension method of course (with a better name, but I don't have time to think of one now) - it's not terribly hard to do, just overwriting (or ignoring) duplicate keys. The important bit (to my mind) is using SelectMany, and realising that a dictionary supports iteration over its key/value pairs.

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Thanks Jon, you're right, I should have specified how duplicates should be handled (just did). Cool solution! –  orip Nov 16 '08 at 18:30
    
To actually merge the values instead of just taking them from the first dictionary you can replace group => group.First() with group => group.SelectMany(value => value) in Jon Skeet's edited answer. –  legenden Apr 13 '11 at 15:53
    
+1: Awesome solution! I used ".Sum()" in my implementation instead of ".First()", since my value was an integer, to get the total of values across a couple of dictionaries containing duplicate keys. –  reSPAWNed May 10 '13 at 12:28
1  
Now I'm wondering that GroupBy would be better suited than ToLookup ? I think ILookup just adds an indexer, size property and contains method on top of IGrouping - so it got to be a tiny little bit faster ? –  toong May 30 '13 at 15:25
1  
@toong: Either should be fine, to be honest. Using GroupBy could indeed be a little bit more efficient - but I doubt that it would be significant either way. –  Jon Skeet May 30 '13 at 17:06
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Well, I'm late to the party, but here is what I use. It doesn't explode if there are multiple keys ("righter" keys replace "lefter" keys), can merge a number of dictionaries (if desired) and preserves the type (with the restriction that it requires a meaningful default public constructor):

public static class DictionaryExtensions
{
    // Works in C#3/VS2008:
    // Returns a new dictionary of this ... others merged leftward.
    // Keeps the type of 'this', which must be default-instantiable.
    // Example: 
    //   result = map.MergeLeft(other1, other2, ...)
    public static T MergeLeft<T,K,V>(this T me, params IDictionary<K,V>[] others)
        where T : IDictionary<K,V>, new()
    {
        T newMap = new T();
        foreach (IDictionary<K,V> src in
            (new List<IDictionary<K,V>> { me }).Concat(others)) {
            // ^-- echk. Not quite there type-system.
            foreach (KeyValuePair<K,V> p in src) {
                newMap[p.Key] = p.Value;
            }
        }
        return newMap;
    }

}
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Well done. This was exactly what I needed. Nice use of generics. Agreed that the syntax is a bit awkward, but nothing you can do about it. –  Peter M Apr 23 '10 at 17:09
    
Very nicely done! –  Rohit Agarwal May 16 '10 at 2:24
    
I liked this solution, but there is a caveat: if the this T me dictionary was declared using new Dictionary<string, T>(StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) or something similar, the resulting dictionary will not retain the same behavior. –  João Portela Jan 9 at 14:51
    
If you make me a Dictionary<K,V>, you can then do var newMap = new Dictionary<TKey, TValue>(me, me.Comparer);, and you also avoid the extra T type parameter. –  ANeves Jan 30 at 11:25
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I would do it like this:

dictionaryFrom.ToList().ForEach(x => dictionaryTo.Add(x.Key, x.Value));

Simple and easy. According to this blog post it's even faster than most loops.

It will of course throw an exception if there's duplicates so you'll have to check before merging.

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22  
If duplicates matter, use dictionaryFrom.ToList().ForEach(x => dictionaryTo[x.Key] = x.Value). This way the values from dictionaryFrom override the value for a possibly existing key. –  okrumnow Feb 21 '12 at 9:46
1  
This is unlikely to be faster than a loop - you forget that ToList() actually ends up copying the dictionary. Faster to code though! ;-) –  Søren Boisen Mar 20 at 16:06
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The trivial solution would be:

using System.Collections.Generic;
...
public static Dictionary<TKey, TValue>
    Merge<TKey,TValue>(IEnumerable<Dictionary<TKey, TValue>> dictionaries)
{
    var result = new Dictionary<TKey, TValue>();
    foreach (var dict in dictionaries)
        foreach (var x in dict)
            result[x.Key] = x.Value;
    return result;
}
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Try the following

static Dictionary<TKey, TValue>
    Merge<TKey, TValue>(this IEnumerable<Dictionary<TKey, TValue>> enumerable)
{
    return enumerable.SelectMany(x => x).ToDictionary(x => x.Key, y => y.Value);
}
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Thanks JaredPar, cool! –  orip Nov 16 '08 at 18:32
1  
it should actually be: return enumerable.SelectMany... –  Rami A. Jul 1 '10 at 1:41
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Dictionary<String, String> allTables = new Dictionary<String, String>();
allTables = tables1.Union(tables2).ToDictionary(pair => pair.Key, pair => pair.Value);
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Just wondering - wouldn't just Union just work? foreach(var kvp in Message.GetAttachments().Union(mMessage.GetImages())) Using it in production code, if there are any downsides please let me know! :) –  Michal Stefanow Aug 2 '13 at 7:21
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How about adding a params overload?

Also, you should type them as IDictionary for maximum flexibility.

public static IDictionary<TKey, TValue> Merge<TKey, TValue>(IEnumerable<IDictionary<TKey, TValue>> dictionaries)
{
    // ...
}

public static IDictionary<TKey, TValue> Merge<TKey, TValue>(params IDictionary<TKey, TValue>[] dictionaries)
{
    return Merge((IEnumerable<TKey, TValue>) dictionaries);
}
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1  
Nice interface :) –  orip Nov 17 '08 at 7:56
4  
Downvoted because this doesn’t answer the question at all. –  Timwi Aug 1 '10 at 8:12
1  
He's kind of adding to the other answers here by noting you can make the DictionaryExtensions class even nicer. Perhaps this question should become a wiki, or a class checked in to git... . –  Chris Moschini Dec 13 '12 at 7:15
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Here is a helper function I use:

using System.Collections.Generic;
namespace HelperMethods
{
    public static class MergeDictionaries
    {
        public static void Merge<TKey, TValue>(this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> first, IDictionary<TKey, TValue> second)
        {
            if (second == null) return;
            if (first == null) first = new Dictionary<TKey, TValue>();
            foreach (var item in second) 
                if (!first.ContainsKey(item.Key)) 
                    first.Add(item.Key, item.Value);
        }
    }
}
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There are a lot of great solutions listed here, but I rather like the simplicity of this one the most. Just my personal preference. –  jason Oct 19 '12 at 15:24
1  
if(first == null) then this logic is useless because first is not ref and is not returned. And it can't be ref because it's declared as an interface instance; you need to either remove the error-checking or declare it as a class instance or just return a new dictionary (with no extension method). –  Jesdisciple Mar 15 '13 at 6:18
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Based on the answers above, but adding a Func-parameter to let the caller handle the duplicates:

public static Dictionary<TKey, TValue> Merge<TKey, TValue>(this IEnumerable<Dictionary<TKey, TValue>> dicts, 
                                                           Func<IGrouping<TKey, TValue>, TValue> resolveDuplicates)
{
    if (resolveDuplicates == null)
        resolveDuplicates = new Func<IGrouping<TKey, TValue>, TValue>(group => group.First());

    return dicts.SelectMany<Dictionary<TKey, TValue>, KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>(dict => dict)
                .ToLookup(pair => pair.Key, pair => pair.Value)
                .ToDictionary(group => group.Key, group => resolveDuplicates(group));
}
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The party's pretty much dead now, but here's an "improved" version of user166390 that made its way into my extension library. Apart from some details, I added a delegate to calculate the merged value.

/// <summary>
/// Merges a dictionary against an array of other dictionaries.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="TResult">The type of the resulting dictionary.</typeparam>
/// <typeparam name="TKey">The type of the key in the resulting dictionary.</typeparam>
/// <typeparam name="TValue">The type of the value in the resulting dictionary.</typeparam>
/// <param name="source">The source dictionary.</param>
/// <param name="mergeBehavior">A delegate returning the merged value. (Parameters in order: The current key, The current value, The previous value)</param>
/// <param name="mergers">Dictionaries to merge against.</param>
/// <returns>The merged dictionary.</returns>
public static TResult MergeLeft<TResult, TKey, TValue>(
    this TResult source,
    Func<TKey, TValue, TValue, TValue> mergeBehavior,
    params IDictionary<TKey, TValue>[] mergers)
    where TResult : IDictionary<TKey, TValue>, new()
{
    var result = new TResult();
    var sources = new List<IDictionary<TKey, TValue>> { source }
        .Concat(mergers);

    foreach (var kv in sources.SelectMany(src => src))
    {
        TValue previousValue;
        result.TryGetValue(kv.Key, out previousValue);
        result[kv.Key] = mergeBehavior(kv.Key, kv.Value, previousValue);
    }

    return result;
}
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Merging using an extension method. It does not throw exception when there are duplicate keys, but replaces those keys with keys from the second dictionary.

internal static class DictionaryExtensions
{
    public static Dictionary<T1, T2> Merge<T1, T2>(this Dictionary<T1, T2> first, Dictionary<T1, T2> second)
    {
        if (first == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("first");
        if (second == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("second");

        var merged = new Dictionary<T1, T2>();
        first.ToList().ForEach(kv => merged[kv.Key] = kv.Value);
        second.ToList().ForEach(kv => merged[kv.Key] = kv.Value);

        return merged;
    }
}

Usage:

Dictionary<string, string> merged = first.Merge(second);
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Merging using an EqualityComparer that maps items for comparison to a different value/type. Here we will map from KeyValuePair (item type when enumerating a dictionary) to Key.

public class MappedEqualityComparer<T,U> : EqualityComparer<T>
{
    Func<T,U> _map;

    public MappedEqualityComparer(Func<T,U> map)
    {
        _map = map;
    }

    public override bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        return EqualityComparer<U>.Default.Equals(_map(x), _map(y));
    }

    public override int GetHashCode(T obj)
    {
        return _map(obj).GetHashCode();
    }
}

Usage:

// if dictA and dictB are of type Dictionary<int,string>
var dict = dictA.Concat(dictB)
                .Distinct(new MappedEqualityComparer<KeyValuePair<int,string>,int>(item => item.Key))
                .ToDictionary(item => item.Key, item=> item.Value);
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I'm very late to the party and perhaps missing something, but if either there are no duplicate keys or, as the OP says, "In case of collision, it doesn't matter which value is saved to the dict as long as it's consistent," what's wrong with this one (merging D2 into D1)?

foreach (KeyValuePair<string,int> item in D2)
            {
                 D1[item.Key] = item.Value;
            }

It seems simple enough, maybe too simple, I wonder if I'm missing something. This is what I'm using in some code where I know there are no duplicate keys. I'm still in testing, though, so I'd love to know now if I'm overlooking something, instead of finding out later.

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