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D'oh! I just made a perfectly good commit to the wrong branch. How do I undo the last commit in my master branch and then take those same changes and get them into my upgrade branch?

Thanks!

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4 Answers

up vote 163 down vote accepted

If you haven't yet pushed your changes, you can also do a soft reset:

git reset --soft HEAD^

This will revert the commit, but put the committed changes back into your index. Assuming the branches are relatively up-to-date with regard to each other, git will let you do a checkout into the other branch, whereupon you can simply commit:

git checkout branch
git commit

The disadvantage is that you need to re-enter your commit message.

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note that the soft reset leaves your changes staged and ready to commit. made me a little confused when my IDE didn't show the files return to the modified state after soft reset. –  Mike Johnson Jan 24 '12 at 17:46
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perfect fix, actually had a couple commits so did HEAD^^ and bam all is gravy –  pablo Jan 27 '12 at 17:58
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Thanks. This has saved me twice. If the branches are somewhat different, after the reset and before the checkout you may have to stash your changes before you can checkout another branch. Reapply the stash after checkout –  Kirby Jul 16 '12 at 22:01
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zsh users: you might find you need to escape the ^ like so: git reset --soft HEAD\^ –  Stephen J. Fuhry Dec 11 '12 at 15:41
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If you get a More? in your Windows command line, use quotes to surround HEAD^ like so: git reset --soft "HEAD^" –  Nate Cook Apr 29 '13 at 19:48
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To rollback one commit (make sure you note the commit's hash for the next step):

git reset --hard HEAD^

To pull that commit into a different branch:

git checkout other-branch
git cherry-pick COMMIT-HASH

Also note that reset --hard will kill any untracked changes you might have, so if you have those you might prefer:

git reset HEAD^
git checkout .
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also, this is the bible for anything git: progit.org/book –  Ben May 31 '10 at 5:35
    
git rev-parse BRANCH_NAME to get the sha. –  wilhelmtell May 31 '10 at 5:51
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If you forget to note the hash first, just use git reflog show <branch>! –  Jefromi May 31 '10 at 12:21
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@Jefromi I was scared there for a minute. –  Ian Hunter Nov 19 '11 at 0:56
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For an extra secure feeling, perform the cherry-pick first on the correct branch and only then reset the wrong branch. –  Age Mooij Dec 27 '11 at 22:54
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If you already pushed your changes, you will need to force your next push after resetting the HEAD.

git reset --hard HEAD^
git merge COMMIT_SHA1
git push --force

Just in case, on Windows(using Windows cmd line, not bash) it's actually four ^^^^ instead of one, so it's

git reset --hard HEAD^^^^
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Note that you should not force-push to a branch that other people are using unless absolutely necessary - otherwise they will be unable to push until they rebase. If you're the sole developer using git, however, this is fine. –  Blair Holloway May 31 '10 at 6:29
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Or unless you realize quickly enough before anyone else has pulled the erroneous commits. –  Michael Mior May 12 '11 at 15:30
    
If your more than one commit off, you can specify the commit you need: git reset --hard COMMIT_HASH git push --force –  David Cramblett Dec 18 '12 at 22:37
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4 years late on the topic, but this might be helpful to someone.

If you forgot to create a new branch before commiting and commited all on master, no matter hw many commits you did, the following approach is easier:

git checkout origin/master
git checkout -b my_feature
git merge master
git checkout master
git reset --hard HEAD~number_of_commits 

number of commits you can see on git status, as it shows:

Your branch is ahead of 'origin/master' by number_of_commits commits.

now you have your master branch equals to orgin/master and all new commits are on my_feature. Note that my_feature is a local branch, not a remote one.

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