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This causes a compile-time exception:

public sealed class ValidatesAttribute<T> : Attribute
{

}

[Validates<string>]
public static class StringValidation
{

}

I realize C# does not support generic attributes. However, after much Googling, I can't seem to find the reason.

Does anyone know why generic types cannot derive from Attribute? Any theories?

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7  
You could do [Validates(typeof(string)] - I agree generics would be nicer... –  ConsultUtah Mar 1 '10 at 19:43
10  
Even though this is a very late addition to this question, it's sad that not only attributes themselves but also abstract attribute classes (which obviously cannot be instantiated as attributes anyways) aren't allwed, like this: abstract class Base<T>: Attribute {} which could be used to create non-generic derived classes like this: class Concrete: Base<MyType> {} –  Lucero May 19 '10 at 18:46
32  
I crave for generic attributes and attributes accepting lambdas. Imagine things like [DependsOnProperty<Foo>(f => f.Bar)] or [ForeignKey<Foo>(f => f.IdBar)]... –  Jacek Gorgoń Aug 10 '11 at 19:39
    
This would be extremely useful in a situation I just encountered; it would be nice to create a LinkedValueAttribute that accepted a generic type and enforced that type on the actual value specified. I could use it for enums to specify the "default" value of another enum that should be used if this enum value is chosen. Multiple of these attributes could be specified for different types, and I could get the value I need based on the type I need. I can set it up to use Type and Object but being strongly typed would be a huge plus. –  KeithS Aug 22 '12 at 18:42
3  
If you don't mind a little IL, this looks promising. –  Jarrod Dixon Oct 9 '12 at 18:39
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5 Answers 5

up vote 163 down vote accepted

Well, I can't answer why it's not available, but I can confirm that it's not a CLI issue. The CLI spec doesn't mention it (as far as I can see) and if you use IL directly you can create a generic attribute. The part of the C# 3 spec that bans it - section 10.1.4 "Class base specification" doesn't give any justification.

The annotated ECMA C# 2 spec doesn't give any helpful information either, although it does provide an example of what's not allowed.

My copy of the annotated C# 3 spec should arrive tomorrow... I'll see if that gives any more information. Anyway, it's definitely a language decision rather than a runtime one.

EDIT: Answer from Eric Lippert (paraphrased): no particular reason, except to avoid complexity in both the language and compiler for a use case which doesn't add much value.

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55  
"except to avoid complexity in both the language and compiler"...and that from the people giving us co and contravariance... –  flq Jan 21 '09 at 21:41
103  
"use case which doesn't add much value"? That's a subjective opinion, it could provide me a lot of value! –  Jon Kruger Sep 21 '09 at 19:00
11  
@Timwi: Who is he to say this? He's one of the language designers - it's his job to make decisions like this. He has to judge which of the many new possible features will have the most positive impact on users. Finite resources, high cost of design/implementation/test, etc. –  Jon Skeet Jul 30 '10 at 10:53
8  
@Timwi: I don't think Eric has any particular duty to account for every decision the design team makes. Eric puts a lot of time into explaining design decisions, but there certainly isn't enough time to give details of every single rejected feature. –  Jon Skeet Jul 30 '10 at 22:11
8  
The thing that bothers me the most about not having this feature, is not being able to do stuff like [PropertyReference(x => x.SomeProperty)]. Instead, you need magic strings and typeof(), which I think kind of sucks. –  asbjornu Jun 25 '11 at 12:38
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An attribute decorates a class at compile-time, but a generic class does not receive its final type information until runtime. Since the attribute can affect compilation, it has to be "complete" at compile time.

See this MSDN article for more information.

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The article restates that they are not possible, but without reason. I conceptually understand your answer. Do you know of any more official documentation on the issue? –  Bryan Watts Nov 16 '08 at 19:21
2  
Bryan: I can ask the C# team if you're interested... no guarantee of an answer, but we can hope. –  Jon Skeet Nov 16 '08 at 19:26
1  
The article does cover the fact that the IL still contains generic placeholders that are substituted with the actual type at runtime. The rest was inferred by me... :) –  GalacticCowboy Nov 16 '08 at 19:46
    
Thanks for the clarification. I am going to leave the question open at this point. I voted for you :-) –  Bryan Watts Nov 16 '08 at 19:52
1  
ECMA-334, section 14.16 says "Constant expressions are required in the contexts listed below and this is indicated in the grammar by using constant-expression. In these contexts, a compile-time error occurs if an expression cannot be fully evaluated at compile-time." Attributes are in the list. –  GalacticCowboy Nov 16 '08 at 20:44
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I don't know why it's not allowed, but this is one possible workaround

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class)]
public class ClassDescriptionAttribute : Attribute
{
    public ClassDescriptionAttribute(Type KeyDataType)
    {
        _KeyDataType = KeyDataType;
    }

    public Type KeyDataType
    {
        get { return _KeyDataType; }
    }
    private Type _KeyDataType;
}


[ClassDescriptionAttribute(typeof(string))]
class Program
{
    ....
}
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3  
Unfortunately, you lose compile-time typing when consuming the attribute. Imagine the attribute creates something of the generic type. You can work around it, but it would be nice; it's one of those intuitive things you're surprised you can't do, like variance (currently). –  Bryan Watts Nov 17 '08 at 0:20
8  
Sadly trying to not do this is why I found this SO question. I guess I'll just have to stick with dealing with typeof. It really feels ilke a dirty keyword now after generics have existed for so long now. –  Chris Marisic Dec 31 '09 at 18:12
2  
You also loose generic constraints... –  Jakub Konecki Mar 17 '11 at 22:18
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This is a very good question. In my experience with attributes, I think the constraint is in place because when reflecting on an attribute it would create a condition in which you would have to check for all possible type permutations: typeof(Validates<string>), typeof(Validates<SomeCustomType>), etc...

In my opinion, if a custom validation is required depending on the type, an attribute may not be the best approach.

Perhaps a validation class that takes in a SomeCustomValidationDelegate or an ISomeCustomValidator as a parameter would be a better approach.

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I agree with you. I have had this question for a long time, and am currently building a validation system. I used my current terminology to ask the question, but have no intention of implementing an approach based on this mechanism. –  Bryan Watts Nov 16 '08 at 19:24
    
+1 That is probably the reason. Good one. –  Jonathan C Dickinson Nov 17 '08 at 9:46
    
I stumbled across this while working on a design for the same goal: validation. I'm trying to do it in a way that is easy to analyze both automatically (i.e., you could generate a report describing validation in the application for confirmation) and by a human visualizing the code. If not attributes, I'm not sure what the best solution would be... I might still try the attribute design, but manually declare type-specific attributes. It's a bit more work, but the aim is for the reliability of knowing the validation rules (and being able to report on them for confirmation). –  bamccaig Jan 13 '10 at 21:54
1  
you could check against the generic type definitions (i.e. typeof(Validates<>)) ... –  Yaurthek Jul 24 '13 at 20:05
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This is not truly generic and you still have to write specific attribute class per type, but you may be able to use a generic base interface to code a little defensively, write lesser code than otherwise required, get benefits of polymorphism etc.

//an interface which means it can't have its own implementation. 
//You might need to use extension methods on this interface for that.
public interface ValidatesAttribute<T>
{
    T Value { get; } //or whatever that is
    bool IsValid { get; } //etc
}

public class ValidatesStringAttribute : Attribute, ValidatesAttribute<string>
{
    //...
}
public class ValidatesIntAttribute : Attribute, ValidatesAttribute<int>
{
    //...
}

[ValidatesString]
public static class StringValidation
{

}
[ValidatesInt]
public static class IntValidation
{

}
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