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I don't know if this question would fit better on superuser.com, but since it's rather compiler related, I give it a try here.

I have to use Qt with a specific version of gcc (4.5). I downloaded the last official Qt release for Windows (Vista, 32 bits version) and didn't install the shipped MinGW version; I just installed the Qt libraries/binaries.

In a console, when I type qmake && make, make fails, complaining that 'g++' is not recognized as an internal command.

If I type g++ in the same console, I however have the following output:

g++: no input files

So g++ is definitely recognized.

For those who may ask, both the Qt binaries directory and MinGW binaries directory are in the system PATH environment variable.

What could be wrong here ?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The "not an internal command" message is not one you would get if the g++ executable simply could not be found. For example, this makefile:

foo:
    zz foo.cpp

gives the error:

make: zz: Command not found

when the zz executabe does not exist. I don't know what is meant by an "internal command", but I think you need to post the part of the makefile tat causes the problem. Oh, and check that you are actually using GNU make.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I translated the error message; that's why it probably isn't accurate. Anyway, your last assumption helped me a lot: it was using some weird make.exe from a GNU tools package and not the legacy MinGW's make.exe. Thanks. – ereOn May 31 '10 at 9:11
    
@erreOn This is one of the main reasons I don't believe programming tools should be internationalised! – anon May 31 '10 at 9:15

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