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I need to extract the zipcode from file's line. each line contains an adress and is formatted in a different way. eg. "Großen Haag 5c, DE-47559 Kranenburg" or "Lange Ruthe 7b, 55294 Bodenheim"

the zipcode is always a five digit number and sometimes follows "DE-". I use Java. Thanks a lot!

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up vote 3 down vote accepted
\b\d{5}\b

will match 5 digits if they are "on their own", i.e. surrounded by word boundaries (to ensure we're not matching substrings of a longer sequence of numbers, although those will probably be rare in an address file).

Remember that you'll need to escape the backslashes in a Java string ("\\b\\d{5}\\b").

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thanks! but they are not always "alone". sometimes I have "DE-12345" – tzippy May 31 '10 at 9:53
    
Yes, and this works since the position between the - and the number counts as a word boundary. It just won't match a number like 123456 because it contains more than five digits. – Tim Pietzcker May 31 '10 at 9:55
    
Ah okay, didn't get the maning of word boundaries. Thanks! Another question concerning Java: matcher.matches() gives me a boolean but how do I return the zipcode itsself? – tzippy May 31 '10 at 9:59
    
I think you shouldn't rely on the word boundary if the data is entered by users - maybe someone enters D12345. Five digits won't appear anywhere else, so it's a good bet that it's the zip code anyway. That is, unless there are house numbers with five digits, of course, but I'm not aware of any :) – OregonGhost May 31 '10 at 10:00
    
we don't have five digit house numbers in germany =) – tzippy May 31 '10 at 10:03

Pattern.matcher("[0-9]{5}")

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