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I need to learn how to pass an associative array to a function so that I could do the following within the function:

function someName($argums) {
    if (gettype($argums) != 'array' || 
       !array_key_exists('myOneKey', $argums) ||
       !array_key_exists('myOtherKey', $argums)) {              
           return false;
    } 

    /*do other stuff*/
}

(That's how I would do it in PHP that I am looking for in JavaScript.)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

All Javascript objects are associative arrays, so this is really easy. You actually have a few options, because an object can have properties of its own, properties it inherits from its prototype object, properties with undefined values, and properties with "falsey" values (undefined, null, 0, "", or of course, false). (There's a difference between an object not having a property and having one with an undefined value.)

Checking to see if the object has the properties itself: You use obj.hasOwnProperty:

function someName(obj) {
    if (!obj ||
        !obj.hasOwnProperty('myOneKey') ||
        !obj.hasOwnProperty('myOtherKey'))
        return false;
    }
    // Do other stuff
}

Checking to see if the object has the property itself or via its prototype: You use propName in obj:

function someName(obj) {
    if (!obj ||
        !('myOneKey' in obj) ||
        !('myOtherKey' in obj))
        return false;
    }
    // Do other stuff
}

Checking to see if the object has the property (directly, or via prototype) and it's not undefined: You look for an undefined value:

function someName(obj) {
    if (!obj ||
        typeof obj.myOneKey === "undefined" ||
        typeof obj.myOtherKey === "undefined")
        return false;
    }
    // Do other stuff
}

Checking to see if the property is falsey (undefined, null, 0, "", or of course, false), regardless of why: Just use !:

function someName(obj) {
    if (!obj ||
        !obj.myOneKey ||
        !obj.myOtherKey)
        return false;
    }
    // Do other stuff
}

Regardless, usage:

var obj = {
    myOneKey: 'fred',
    myOtherKey: 'barney'
};
someName(obj);
share|improve this answer
    
And how would I call that function with such arguments? –  Alex Polo May 31 '10 at 11:43
    
And can't I use the in operator instead of hasOwnProperty? –  Alex Polo May 31 '10 at 11:44
    
@dfjhdfjhdf: I was adding a discussion of that and the distinction between them as you were asking the question, apparently. :-) –  T.J. Crowder May 31 '10 at 11:50
    
Yeah, thank you very much! –  Alex Polo May 31 '10 at 12:14
    
+1 - Great answer for including all the FAQs that come along with this –  Nick Craver May 31 '10 at 12:49

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