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How do I get the last id inserted into a table? In MS SQL there is SCOPE_IDENTITY().

Please, do not advise use something like this:

select max(id) from table
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6 Answers 6

up vote 117 down vote accepted

( tl;dr : goto option 3: INSERT with RETURNING )

Recall that in postgresql there is no "id" concept for tables, just sequences (which are typically but not necessarily used as default values for surrogate primary keys, with the SERIAL pseudo-type).

If you are interested in getting the id of a newly inserted row, there are several ways:


Option 1: CURRVAL(<sequence name>);.

For example:

  INSERT INTO persons (lastname,firstname) VALUES ('Smith', 'John');
  SELECT currval('persons_id_seq');

The name of the sequence must be known, it's really arbitrary; in this example we assume that the table persons has an id column created with the SERIAL pseudo-type. To avoid relying on this and to feel more clean, you can use instead pg_get_serial_sequence:

  INSERT INTO persons (lastname,firstname) VALUES ('Smith', 'John');
  SELECT currval(pg_get_serial_sequence('persons','id'));

Caveat: currval() only works after an INSERT (which has executed nextval() ), in the same session.


Option 2: LASTVAL();

This is similar to the previous, only that you don't need to specify the sequence number: it looks for the most recent modified sequence (always inside your session, same caveat as above).


Both CURRVAL and LASTVAL are totally concurrent safe. The behaviour of sequence in PG is designed so that different session will not interfere, so there is no risk of race conditions (if another session inserts another row between my INSERT and my SELECT, I still get my correct value).

However they do have a subtle potential problem. If the database has some TRIGGER (or RULE) that, on insertion into persons table, makes some extra insertions in other tables... then LASTVAL will probably give us the wrong value. The problem can even happen with CURRVAL, if the extra insertions are done intto the same persons table (this is much less usual, but the risk still exists).


Option 3: INSERT with RETURNING

INSERT INTO persons (lastname,firstname) VALUES ('Smith', 'John') RETURNING id;

This is the most clean, efficient and safe way to get the id. It doesn't have any of the risks of the previous.

Drawbacks? Almost none: you might need to modify the way you call your INSERT statement (in the worst case, perhaps your API or DB layer does not expect an INSERT to return a value); it's not standard SQL (who cares); it's available since Postgresql 8.2 (Dec 2006...)


Conclusion: If you can, go for option 3. Elsewhere, prefer 1.

Note: all these methods are useless if you intend to get the last globally inserted id (not necessarily in your session). For this, you must resort to select max(id) from table (of course, this will not read uncommitted inserts from other transactions).

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1  
Thanks for the quick link to documentation. That was really helpful :) –  chakrit Sep 13 '12 at 18:55
9  
LASTVAL() might be very evil, in case you add a trigger / rule inserting rows on itself into another table. –  Kouber Saparev Oct 25 '12 at 15:17
    
@KouberSaparev: yes, good observation –  leonbloy Oct 26 '12 at 17:02
    
SELECT max(id) unfortunately does not do the job either as soon as you start deleting rows. –  Simon A. Eugster Nov 2 '12 at 16:44
    
@SimonA.Eugster Why not? –  leonbloy Nov 2 '12 at 17:11

See the RETURNING clause of the INSERT statement. Basically, the INSERT doubles as a query and gives you back the value that was inserted.

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3  
Works as of version 8.2 and is the best and fastest solution. –  Frank Heikens May 31 '10 at 15:04

you can use RETURNING clause in INSERT statement,just like the following

wgzhao=# create table foo(id int,name text);
CREATE TABLE
wgzhao=# insert into foo values(1,'wgzhao') returning id;
 id 
----
  1
(1 row)

INSERT 0 1
wgzhao=# insert into foo values(3,'wgzhao') returning id;
 id 
----
  3
(1 row)

INSERT 0 1

wgzhao=# create table bar(id serial,name text);
CREATE TABLE
wgzhao=# insert into bar(name) values('wgzhao') returning id;
 id 
----
  1
(1 row)

INSERT 0 1
wgzhao=# insert into bar(name) values('wgzhao') returning id;
 id 
----
  2
(1 row)

INSERT 0 
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See the below example

CREATE TABLE users (
    -- make the "id" column a primary key; this also creates
    -- a UNIQUE constraint and a b+-tree index on the column
    id    SERIAL PRIMARY KEY,
    name  TEXT,
    age   INT4
);

INSERT INTO users (name, age) VALUES ('Mozart', 20);

Then for getting last inserted id use this for table "user" seq column name "id"

SELECT currval(pg_get_serial_sequence('users', 'id'));
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SELECT CURRVAL(pg_get_serial_sequence('my_tbl_name','id_col_name'))

You need to supply the table name and column name of course.

This will be for the current session / connection http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.3/static/functions-sequence.html

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Try this:

select nextval('my_seq_name');  // Returns next value

If this return 1 (or whatever is the start_value for your sequence), then reset the sequence back to the original value, passing the false flag:

select setval('my_seq_name', 1, false);

Otherwise,

select setval('my_seq_name', nextValue - 1, true);

This will restore the sequence value to the original state and "setval" will return with the sequence value you are looking for.

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