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I am developing a system as an aid to musicians performing transcription. The aim is to perform automatic music transcription (it does not have to be perfect, as the user will correct glitches / mistakes later) on a single instrument monophonic recording. Does anyone here have experience in automatic music transcription? Or digital signal processing in general? Help from anyone is greatly appreciated no matter what your background.

So far I have investigated the use of the Fast Fourier Transform for pitch detection, and a number of tests in both MATLAB and my own Java test programs have shown it to be fast and accurate enough for my needs. Another element of the task that will need to be tackled is the display of the produced MIDI data in sheet music form, but this is something I am not concerned with right now.

In brief, what I am looking for is a good method for note onset detection, i.e. the position in the signal where a new note begins. As slow onsets can be quite difficult to detect properly, I will initially be using the system with piano recordings. This is also partially due to the fact I play piano and should be in a better position to obtain suitable recordings for testing. As stated above, early versions of this system will be used for simple monophonic recordings, possibly progressing later to more complex input depending on progress made in the coming weeks.

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6 Answers

up vote 40 down vote accepted

Here is a graphic that illustrates the threshold approach to note onset detection:

alt text

This image shows a typical WAV file with three discrete notes played in succession. The red line represents a chosen signal threshold, and the blue lines represent note start positions returned by a simple algorithm that marks a start when the signal level crosses the threshold.

As the image shows, selecting a proper absolute threshold is difficult. In this case, the first note is picked up fine, the second note is missed completely, and the third note (barely) is started very late. In general, a low threshold causes you to pick up phantom notes, while raising it causes you to miss notes. One solution to this problem is to use a relative threshold that triggers a start if the signal increases by a certain percentage over a certain time, but this has problems of its own.

A simpler solution is to use the somewhat-counterintuitively named compression (not MP3 compression - that's something else entirely) on your wave file first. Compression essentially flattens the spikes in your audio data and then amplifies everything so that more of the audio is near the maximum values. The effect on the above sample would look like this (which shows why the name "compression" appears to make no sense - on audio equipment it's usually labelled "loudness"):

alt text

After compression, the absolute threshold approach will work much better (although it's easy to over-compress and start picking up fictional note starts, the same effect as lowering the threshold). There are a lot of wave editors out there that do a good job of compression, and it's better to let them handle this task - you'll probably need to do a fair amount of work "cleaning up" your wave files before detecting notes in them anyway.

In coding terms, a WAV file loaded into memory is essentially just an array of two-byte integers, where 0 represents no signal and 32,767 and -32,768 represent the peaks. In its simplest form, a threshold detection algorithm would just start at the first sample and read through the array until it finds a value greater than the threshold.

short threshold = 10000;
for (int i = 0; i < samples.Length; i++)
{
    if ((short)Math.Abs(samples[i]) > threshold) 
    {
        // here is one note onset point
    }
}

In practice this works horribly, since normal audio has all sorts of transient spikes above a given threshold. One solution is to use a running average signal strength (i.e. don't mark a start until the average of the last n samples is above the threshold).

short threshold = 10000;
int window_length = 100;
int running_total = 0;
// tally up the first window_length samples
for (int i = 0; i < window_length; i++)
{
    running_total += samples[i];
}
// calculate moving average
for (int i = window_length; i < samples.Length; i++)
{
    // remove oldest sample and add current
    running_total -= samples[i - window_length];
    running_total += samples[i];
    short moving_average = running_total / window_length;
    if (moving_average > threshold)
    {
        // here is one note onset point 
        int onset_point = i - (window_length / 2);
    }
}

All of this requires much tweaking and playing around with settings to get it to find the start positions of a WAV file accurately, and usually what works for one file will not work very well on another. This is a very difficult and not-perfectly-solved problem domain you've chosen, but I think it's cool that you're tackling it.

Update: this graphic shows a detail of note detection I left out, namely detecting when the note ends:

alt text

The yellow line represents the off-threshold. Once the algorithm has detected a note start, it assumes the note continues until the running average signal strength drops below this value (shown here by the purple lines). This is, of course, another source of difficulties, as is the case where two or more notes overlap (polyphony).

Once you've detected the start and stop points of each note, you can now analyze each slice of WAV file data to determine the pitches.

Update 2: I just read your updated question. Pitch-detection through auto-correlation is much easier to implement than FFT if you're writing your own from scratch, but if you've already checked out and used a pre-built FFT library, you're better off using it for sure. Once you've identified the start and stop positions of each note (and included some padding at the beginning and end for the missed attack and release portions), you can now pull out each slice of audio data and pass it to an FFT function to determine the pitch.

One important point here is not to use a slice of the compressed audio data, but rather to use a slice of the original, unmodified data. The compression process distorts the audio and may produce an inaccurate pitch reading.

One last point about note attack times is that it may be less of a problem than you think. Often in music an instrument with a slow attack (like a soft synth) will begin a note earlier than a sharp attack instrument (like a piano) and both notes will sound as if they're starting at the same time. If you're playing instruments in this manner, the algorithm with pick up the same start time for both kinds of instruments, which is good from a WAV-to-MIDI perspective.

Last update (I hope): Forget what I said about including some paddings samples from the early attack part of each note - I forgot this is actually a bad idea for pitch detection. The attack portions of many instruments (especially piano and other percussive-type instruments) contain transients that aren't multiples of the fundamental pitch, and will tend to screw up pitch detection. You actually want to start each slice a little after the attack for this reason.

Oh, and kind of important: the term "compression" here does not refer to MP3-style compression.

Update again: here is a simple function that does non-dynamic compression:

public void StaticCompress(short[] samples, float param)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < samples.Length; i++)
    {
        int sign = (samples[i] < 0) ? -1 : 1;
        float norm = ABS(samples[i] / 32768); // NOT short.MaxValue
        norm = 1.0 - POW(1.0 - norm, param);
        samples[i] = 32768 * norm * sign;
    }
}

When param = 1.0, this function will have no effect on the audio. Larger param values (2.0 is good, which will square the normalized difference between each sample and the max peak value) will produce more compression and a louder overall (but crappy) sound. Values under 1.0 will produce an expansion effect.

One other probably obvious point: you should record the music in a small, non-echoic room since echoes are often picked up by this algorithm as phantom notes.

Update: here is a version of StaticCompress that will compile in C# and explicity casts everything. This returns the expected result:

public void StaticCompress(short[] samples, double param)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < samples.Length; i++)
    {
        Compress(ref samples[i], param);
    }
}

public void Compress(ref short orig, double param)
{
    double sign = 1;
    if (orig < 0)
    {
        sign = -1;
    }
    // 32768 is max abs value of a short. best practice is to pre-
    // normalize data or use peak value in place of 32768
    double norm = Math.Abs((double)orig / 32768.0);
    norm = 1.0 - Math.Pow(1.0 - norm, param);
    orig = (short)(32768.0 * norm * sign); // should round before cast,
        // but won't affect note onset detection
}

Sorry, my knowledge score on Matlab is 0. If you posted another question on why your Matlab function doesn't work as expected it would get answered (just not by me).

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That's a very detailed response, thanks :) I'll have to go through it again to make sure I haven't missed anything, and get back to you with any questions. –  Alan Nov 17 '08 at 9:17
1  
is the compression you're talking about Dynamic Range Compression? –  Alan Nov 17 '08 at 9:49
    
@Alan: essentially yes, although you can do non-dynamic range compression as well. Most WAV editors label this effect as "Dynamic Compression", probably to avoid confusion with file-size compression. –  MusiGenesis Nov 17 '08 at 12:45
    
Thanks. Can you perhaps point me towards an algorithm to achieve either dynamic or non-dynamic range compression? So far all I have been able to find is circuit diagrams for the loudness feature in many amplifiers. –  Alan Nov 17 '08 at 12:58
    
I'll post one of my own in a second (the effect it produces sounds horrible, but it may work for this purpose). I have also never found code for a dynamic range compressor. I think 99% of DSP work of this type is realtime (as opposed to full-buffer processing). –  MusiGenesis Nov 17 '08 at 13:17
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What you want to do is often called WAV-to-MIDI (google "wav-to-midi"). There have been many attempts at this process, with varying results (note onset is one of the difficulties; polyphony is much harder to deal with). I'd recommend starting with a thorough search of the off-the-shelf solutions, and only start work on your own if there's nothing acceptable out there.

The other part of the process you'd need is something to render the MIDI output as a traditional musical score, but there are umpteen billion products that do that.

Another answer is: yes, I've done a lot of digital signal processing (see the software on my website - it's an infinite-voice software synthesizer written in VB and C), and I'm interested in helping you with this problem. The WAV-to-MIDI part isn't really that difficult conceptually, it's just making it work reliably in practice that's hard. Note onset is just setting a threshold - errors can be easily adjusted forward or backward in time to compensate for note attack differences. Pitch detection is much easier to do on a recording than it is to do in real time, and involves just implementing an auto-correlation routine.

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Thanks for the reply. Most of the off-the-shelf solutions I have found are not very good, often with accuracy below 60% even for simple recordings. Besides, this is for my undergrad thesis so simply taking an off-the-shelf solution isn't an option. I'll update my question with more info now. –  Alan Nov 16 '08 at 23:32
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this library is centered around audio labeling:

aubio

aubio is a library for audio labelling. Its features include segmenting a sound file before each of its attacks, performing pitch detection, tapping the beat and producing midi streams from live audio. The name aubio comes from 'audio' with a typo: several transcription errors are likely to be found in the results too.

and I have had good luck with it for onset detection and pitch detection. It's in c, but there is swig/python wrappers.

also, the author of the library has a pdf of his thesis on the page, which has great info and background about labeling.

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You should look at MIRToolbox - it is written for Matlab, and has an onset detector built in - it works pretty well. The source code is GPL'd, so you can implement the algorithm in whatever language works for you. What language is your production code going to use?

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Thanks for the link Jason, I'll check it out now. I'm just using MATLAB for some quick tests / investigations into various methods for the different elements of the complete system. The production system will likely be written in Java, taking advantage of javax.sound.* –  Alan Nov 17 '08 at 20:07
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@ALAN Hard onsets are easily detected in the time domain by using an average energy measurement.

SUM from 0 to N (X^2)

do this with chunks of the entire signal. You should see peaks when onsets occur. (the window size is up to you, my suggestion is 50ms or more.

Extensive Papers on Onset Detection:

For Hardcore Engineers

http://www.elec.qmul.ac.uk/people/juan/Documents/Bello-TSAP-2005.pdf

Easier for average person to understand

http://bingweb.binghamton.edu/~ahess2/Onset_Detection_Nov302011.pdf

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You could try to transform the wav signal into a graph of amplitude against time. Then a way to determine a consistent onset is to calculate the intersection of a tangent in the inflection point of the rising flank of a signal with the x axis.

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