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I've been working on a computational physics project (plotting related rates of chemical reactants with respect to eachother to show oscillatory behavior) with a fair amount of success. However, one of my simulations involves more than two active oscillating agents (five, in fact) which would obviously be unsuitable for any single visual plot...

My scheme was hence to have the user select which two reactants they wanted plotted on the x-axis and y-axis respectively. I tried (foolishly) to convert string input values into the respective variable names, but I guess I need a radically different approach if any exist?

If it helps clarify any, here is part of my code:

def coupledBrusselator(A, B, t_trial,display_x,display_y):
    t = 0
    t_step = .01
    X = 0       
    Y = 0
    E = 0
    U = 0
    V = 0
    dX = (A) - (B+1)*(X) + (X**2)*(Y)  
    dY = (B)*(X) - (X**2)*(Y)
    dE = -(E)*(U) - (X)  
    dU = (U**2)*(V) -(E+1)*(U) - (B)*(X)
    dV = (E)*(U) - (U**2)*(V)
    array_t = [0]
    array_X = [0]
    array_Y = [0]
    array_U = [0]
    array_V = [0]       

    while t <= t_trial:             
        X_1 = X + (dX)*(t_step/2)   
        Y_1 = Y + (dY)*(t_step/2)
        E_1 = E + (dE)*(t_step/2)
        U_1 = U + (dU)*(t_step/2)
        V_1 = V + (dV)*(t_step/2) 
        dX_1 = (A) - (B+1)*(X_1) + (X_1**2)*(Y_1)  
        dY_1 = (B)*(X_1) - (X_1**2)*(Y_1)
        dE_1 = -(E_1)*(U_1) - (X_1)  
        dU_1 = (U_1**2)*(V_1) -(E_1+1)*(U_1) - (B)*(X_1)
        dV_1 = (E_1)*(U_1) - (U_1**2)*(V_1)
        X_2 = X + (dX_1)*(t_step/2)
        Y_2 = Y + (dY_1)*(t_step/2)
        E_2 = E + (dE_1)*(t_step/2)
        U_2 = U + (dU_1)*(t_step/2)
        V_2 = V + (dV_1)*(t_step/2) 
        dX_2 = (A) - (B+1)*(X_2) + (X_2**2)*(Y_2)
        dY_2 = (B)*(X_2) - (X_2**2)*(Y_2)
        dE_2 = -(E_2)*(U_2) - (X_2)  
        dU_2 = (U_2**2)*(V_2) -(E_2+1)*(U_2) - (B)*(X_2)
        dV_2 = (E_2)*(U_2) - (U_2**2)*(V_2)   
        X_3 = X + (dX_2)*(t_step)
        Y_3 = Y + (dY_2)*(t_step)
        E_3 = E + (dE_2)*(t_step)
        U_3 = U + (dU_2)*(t_step)
        V_3 = V + (dV_2)*(t_step) 
        dX_3 = (A) - (B+1)*(X_3) + (X_3**2)*(Y_3)
        dY_3 = (B)*(X_3) - (X_3**2)*(Y_3)
        dE_3 = -(E_3)*(U_3) - (X_3)  
        dU_3 = (U_3**2)*(V_3) -(E_3+1)*(U_3) - (B)*(X_3)
        dV_3 = (E_3)*(U_3) - (U_3**2)*(V_3) 
        X = X + ((dX + 2*dX_1 + 2*dX_2 + dX_3)/6) * t_step 
        Y = Y + ((dX + 2*dY_1 + 2*dY_2 + dY_3)/6) * t_step
        E = E + ((dE + 2*dE_1 + 2*dE_2 + dE_3)/6) * t_step          
        U = U + ((dU + 2*dU_1 + 2*dY_2 + dE_3)/6) * t_step
        V = V + ((dV + 2*dV_1 + 2*dV_2 + dE_3)/6) * t_step
        dX = (A) - (B+1)*(X) + (X**2)*(Y)  
        dY = (B)*(X) - (X**2)*(Y)
        t_step = .01 / (1 + dX**2 + dY**2) ** .5
        t = t + t_step
        array_X.append(X) 
        array_Y.append(Y)
        array_E.append(E)
        array_U.append(U)
        array_V.append(V)
        array_t.append(t)   

where previously

display_x = raw_input("Choose catalyst you wish to analyze in the phase/field diagrams (X, Y, E, U, or V) ") 
display_y = raw_input("Choose one other catalyst from list you wish to include in phase/field diagrams ")

coupledBrusselator(A, B, t_trial, display_x, display_y) 

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Once you have calculated the different arrays, you could add them to a dict that maps names to arrays. This can then be used to look up the correct arrays for display_x and display_y:

named_arrays = {
  "X": array_X,
  "Y": array_Y,
  "E": array_E,
  ...
}

return (named_arrays[display_x], named_arrays[display_y])
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that hit the spot! :) –  Jonathan Straus May 31 '10 at 19:54
    
@Jonathan, in this case you should accept @sth's answer (click on the checkbox-shaped outline icon left of the answer) -- that will give you extra rep which should also enable you to upvote it (click on the up-arrow on the very upper left of the answer). By SO's etiquette, thanks are nice, but upvotes and accepts matter!-) –  Alex Martelli May 31 '10 at 20:22

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