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Sorry for the newb question. I'm still learning programming. So I'm using C++, and I need to do something like this:

int n;
do {
    n = get_data();
    if(n != -1)
        send(n);
} while(n != -1);

This is just a sketch. Anyway it doesn't feel real elegant. I have to have my test twice. I could just test once and set a flag, but that doesn't feel real elegant either since I have to check the flag twice. It just seems like there should be a way to do this more easily, since it's so easy what I want to do.

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1  
Honestly I find your code easy to read. Spending time making it shorter (and more time to unpack it in your head when you'll read it again) is not the best investment you can do. Who cares : it works, it's efficient and it's readable. Go to the next lines. –  e-satis Feb 22 '10 at 23:45
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10 Answers 10

int n;
while (-1 != (n = get_data())) {
    send(n);
} // while
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7  
I despise when people put the constant on the left side of the comparison. –  SoapBox Nov 17 '08 at 0:04
    
Some of my former colleagues are offended by this construct (the side effect embedded in the conditional expression) and several textbooks tell you not to do that. I have never really understood why though - I think this is fine, but sometimes best avoided for political reasons. –  finnw Nov 17 '08 at 0:04
3  
You put the constant on the left so that it's a compiler error when you accidentally change == or != to the assignment operator (=). This isn't a problem anymore in most modern languages, especially with modern IDEs. I still do it in C++ code. –  Bill the Lizard Nov 17 '08 at 0:18
1  
I'm surprised that no one commented on the '//while' at the end of such a short loop. –  TM. Nov 17 '08 at 2:58
2  
Personally, I find SCFrench's easier to read. –  Brian Nov 21 '08 at 13:53
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Similar to eed3si9n's but arguably easier to read:

 int n;
 while (n = get_data(), n != -1)
 {
     send(n);
 }
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I'd have to argue against the easrier to read. Most programmers don't understand the comma operator in C and stumble on this type of construct. –  JaredPar Nov 17 '08 at 6:53
    
On the other hand, many programmers also have a hard time with the fact that operator= returns the assigned value, and its use can easily lead to bugs as mentioned elsewhere. But that's why I said "arguably" instead of "definitely" :-) –  SCFrench Nov 17 '08 at 11:45
    
Even if your familiarity with the comma is lacking, this version does look much cleaner. I feel like someone who saw it but wasn't accustomed to commas would still be able to parse this faster than eed3si9n's version. –  Brian Nov 21 '08 at 13:48
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Howabout using break:

int n;
while(1) {
    n = get_data();
    if(n == -1)
        break;
    send(n);
}

This way you only test once, and quit immediately if get_data doesn't return what you want.

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I prefer that because it is most expressive and scales even when get_data() gets more complex. In that case, I'd also add a comment describing the exit condition to the "eternal loop", e.g. // breaks when get_data() == -1. –  peterchen Nov 16 '08 at 23:58
    
This is an instance of the well-known "Loop and a Half" construct: cs.duke.edu/~ola/patterns/plopd/loops.html#loop-and-a-half –  Greg Hewgill Nov 17 '08 at 0:10
    
The most obvious and thus the most elegant it counts for me. –  utku_karatas Nov 17 '08 at 3:40
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for (int n = get_data(); n != -1; n = get_data()) {
  send(n);
}
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Definitely the best/clearest solution to this. –  Richard Corden Nov 18 '08 at 18:06
    
Take out the curly braces if you want to save a line :) –  Jonathan Nov 21 '08 at 9:45
    
Yes, if you do want to make it shorter (which I don't), this would be the best way. A, at least, clever use of the for loop. –  e-satis Feb 22 '10 at 23:47
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Your original version is fine.

In my last C programming job we had to follow the MISRA coding standards.

Under the MISRA rules, this:

int n;
while(1) {
    n = get_data();
    if(n == -1)
        break;
    send(n);
}

is prohibited because of the break, and this:

while((n = get_data()) != -1) { send(n); }

is prohibited because an assignment appears in a boolean context, so I am in the habit of writing loops similar to your original version.

You could a boolean variable if you think it will make your intention clearer or if the test is a complex expression:

int n;
bool valid;
do {
    n = get_data();
    valid = n != -1;
    if(valid)
        send(n);
} while(valid);

But for a simple test like "n != -1" it may not be worth making the program longer.

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1  
I could not find an online version of that MISRA standard (you can buy a book for $25, though...). From your description it feels kind of stupid, imposing a bulky coding style on the programmer. –  Svante Nov 18 '08 at 13:49
    
Also, have a look at knosof.co.uk/misracom.html –  Svante Nov 18 '08 at 13:56
    
@Harleqin, you're right, the resulting code can be bulky, some of the rules are overkill, and some others don't make sense outside embedded platforms. –  finnw Nov 19 '08 at 0:01
    
MISRA enforces that no code gets to be write-only. Its rules are about making any program self-evident. Of course some may get you on performance, but as we all know, optimizations should be made after you have a functional program. If you get a clearly readable code, you allow others to re-use it. –  jpinto3912 Nov 21 '08 at 15:24
    
@jpinto3912 - from this examples it seems like MISRA can sometimes enforce the opposite. –  orip Dec 9 '08 at 6:55
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/* This is cleaner */ 
AGAIN:;
    int n = get_data();
    if (n != -1)
    {
        send(n);
        goto AGAIN;
    }


/* This has some charm as well */ 
int n;
while ((n = get_data()) != -1)
    send(n);
/* and now i see that this is the top answer.  Oh well */ 
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int n;
n = get_data();
while (n != -1) {
  send(n);
  n = get_data();
}
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This is the way were were taught to do loops in cobol, way back when. Would a typical compiler tend to compile this in an efficient form? From what I have seen lazydens solution is typically what a compiler will generate in order to increase instruction cache efficiency –  EvilTeach Mar 25 '11 at 2:03
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Construct with a goto :)

int n;
goto inside; do {
  send(n);
inside:
  n=get_data();
} while(n!=-1);
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There's no difference between a do loop and a while loop if you never enter it from the top, is there? If not I would use the more familiar 'while' form. –  finnw Nov 18 '08 at 23:59
    
Yes, you are right, there are no real difference. It is just a matter of personal taste :) I liked do-while form because lines with getting a data and line with a test over this data (loop condition) reside one after another. –  lazyden Nov 19 '08 at 11:35
    
I would normally vote this down as the formatting makes it hard to read, but it is an interesting approach. –  EvilTeach Mar 25 '11 at 2:02
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In Python you would do this:

while True:
    n = get_data()
    if n == -1:
        break
    send(n)

As you can see, this is not much shorter than your C version. Usually, a Python code is 5 to 10 times smaller than its C equivalent. This is not the case here, so you can enjoy your readable, short enough, fast snippet, and focus on something else.

If you do want to make it shorter, check Jonathan's answer, but really this doesn't matter.

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int get_data()
{
 ...
}

void _send(int )
{
 ...
}

int  send(int (*a) ())
{
   int n = a();

   if (n == -1)
      return n;

   _send(n);
   return 1;
}

int main()
{
  int (*fp)();
  fp = get_data;
  while ( send(fp)!= -1 );

  return 0;
}

HTH

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1  
+1 for a very different approach. –  EvilTeach Mar 25 '11 at 2:01
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