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I want to format a definition list in HTML as if it were a table with th in a column and td in another, with a background that alternates per row (although a background for the dt and another for the dd also fits for the problem), so I have this CSS:

dl {
    font-family: Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif;
    font-size: 0.6em;
    overflow: hidden;
    width: 200px;;
    }
dl dt {
    font-weight: bold;
    float: left;
    clear: left;
    padding-right: 1%;
    width: 48%;
    }

dl dt:nth-of-type(odd),
dl dd:nth-of-type(odd) {
        background-color: #EEE;
    }
dl dt:nth-of-type(even),
dl dd:nth-of-type(even) {
        background-color: #DDD;    
    }
dl dd {
    float: left;
    width: 50%;
    padding-left: 1%;
    margin-left: 0;
    }

Example HTML:

<dl>
  <dt>Key 1</dt>
    <dd>Value 1</dd>
  <dt>Very very very long key 2</dt>
    <dd>Value 2</dd>
  <dt>Key 3</dt>
    <dd>Value 3 with<br /> line breaks</dd>
  <dt>Key 4</dt>
    <dd>Value 4</dd>
</dl>

The problem is that, due to the eventual height dissimilarity, "holes" with no background appears in the list:

Is there a way to fix that?

share|improve this question
    
Is JQuery on option or does this have to be pure css? –  David Perlman May 31 '10 at 21:10
2  
"Tables are bad" proverb doesn't apply to tables. You're making a table, why not use a <table>? (And for good measure: table, table, table) –  mVChr May 31 '10 at 23:41
    
to add on to mVChr -- "Tables are bad" applies to the structure of a site. You don't want your site structured in tables, but there is a time and place for them, which is why the tag isn't deprecated. Use them, they're helpful. Trying to replicate them and their functionality takes time and isn't necessary. –  Kerry Jun 1 '10 at 0:00
    
@mVChr - Why isn't it a definition list? How do you mix a table and definition list? –  Alohci Jun 1 '10 at 0:03
    
@Alohci - What I'm saying is that the behavior he's asking for is delivered in the default behavior of tables, so unless the content is served up by some CMS that makes the markup uneditable, I think constructing this as a table is called for. –  mVChr Jun 1 '10 at 1:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This works in all browsers

(edit* Alohci - not copying you I swear. Just seen your answer after posting this)

<style type="text/css">
dl {
    font-family: Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif;
    font-size: 0.6em;
    overflow: hidden;
    width: 200px;;
}
dl dt {
    font-weight: bold;
    float: left;
    clear: left;
    width: 100px;
    margin-right:-100px;
    padding-right:100px;
}
dl dt, dl dd {
    background-color: #DDD;
}
dl dt.odd, dl dd.odd {
    background-color: #EEE;
}

dl dd {
    float: left;
    width: 100px;
    margin-left: 0;
    padding-left:100px;
    margin-left :-100px
}

span {
    position:relative;
    z-index:10;
}

</style>

<dl>
  <dt class="odd"><span>Key 1</span></dt>
  <dd class="odd"><span>Value 1</span></dd>
  <dt><span>Very very very long key 2</span>
  </dt>
  <dd><span>Value 2</span></dd>
  <dt class="odd"><span>Key 3</span></dt>
  <dd class="odd"><span>Value 3 with<br /> line breaks</span></dd>
  <dt><span>Key 4</span></dt>
  <dd><span>Value 4</span></dd>
</dl>
share|improve this answer

As far as i'm aware, this is not possible with CSS. It is one of the many problems with CSS based forms. The only workaround I know is by using a faux background image representing the what the form should look like, but then this limits the width of the columns.

You may be able to get away with just setting the background-color of the DL, to either the left/right column colour. This may work in this situation.

share|improve this answer
  • display: table-cell; wouldn't work as there is no container for display: table-row; (and of course there is IE support quite ... nonexistent)

  • display: inline-block; let you align vertically your content but backgrounds still have the height of your content, tall or not.

  • If you know for sure what is the tallest element then you could use min-height

  • If you know for sure that each dl will be taller than its dd (or the contrary), then there may be solutions (the shorter elements float while the others have a huge margin, thus creating 2 columns)

  • Otherwise, progressive enhancement with JS is the road to go: by default without JS, your list has one background-color and with JS, you can obtain the height of each element and zebrify everything.

share|improve this answer

Getting rid of the holes is possible, it seems, provided you can wrap the contents of each and every dt and dd in a span, so that the foreground colours of both the dt and dd can overlay the background colours of each. However, note that IE prior to IE9 doesn't support :nth-of-type so this won't work in current IE browsers. You'll need to add alternating classes to work around that. With those provisos, try something like this:

dl {
    font-family: Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif;
    font-size: 0.6em;
    overflow: hidden;
    width: 300px;
    margin-right:-100px;
    }
dl dt {
    font-weight: bold;
    float: left;
    clear: left;
    padding-right: 34%;
    width: 32%;
    }

dl dt:nth-of-type(odd),
dl dd:nth-of-type(odd)  {
        background-color: #EEE;
    }
dl dt:nth-of-type(even),
dl dd:nth-of-type(even)  {
        background-color: #DDD;    
    }

dl dd {
    float: left;
    width: 66%;
    padding-left: 0%;
    margin-left: -66%;
    }

dl dt span {
    position:relative;
    z-index:1;
    display:block;
    }

dl dd span {
    margin-left: 50%;
    display:block;
    }

<dl>
  <dt><span>Key 1</span></dt>
    <dd><span>Value 1</span></dd>
  <dt><span>Very very very long key 2</span></dt>
    <dd><span>Value 2</span></dd>
  <dt><span>Key 3</span></dt>
    <dd><span>Value 3 with<br /> line breaks</span></dd>
  <dt><span>Key 4</span></dt>
    <dd><span>Value 4</span></dd>
</dl>
share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't seem to work with IE7 and 6 as is (edit: dd or dd>span not showing in IE6 and overlapping in IE7) –  FelipeAls Jun 1 '10 at 0:23
    
@Felipe - I'm not surprised at that. I figured that as the question used :nth-of-type that IE6 & 7 wasn't high on the OP's priorities. –  Alohci Jun 1 '10 at 7:55

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