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I have to find recursively if there is any repeated element in an integer array v. The method must have the following signature:

boolean hasRepeatedElements(int[] v) 

I can't see any way of doing that recursively without having to define another method or at least another overload to this method (one that takes for example the element to go after or something). At first I thought about checking for the current v if there is some element equal to the first element, then creating a new array with L-1 elements etc. but that seems rather inefficient. Is it the only way?

Am I missing something here?

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2  
Why does it have to be recursive? –  Tim Lloyd Jun 1 '10 at 1:34
2  
because it is homework/exam-like-question? –  devoured elysium Jun 1 '10 at 1:37
    
Sounds like a sieve job-interview question too. –  Tim Lloyd Jun 1 '10 at 1:39
1  
@chibacity: I'm guessing homework. –  anthony-arnold Jun 1 '10 at 1:39
    
ok, but either way i'd like to know people opinions on it. i guess they want me to make an array copy at each method call, but that doesn't seem like a great idea to me :( –  devoured elysium Jun 1 '10 at 1:39
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I agree that recursion is not terribly necessary here, but it can be used. Do you know quick-sort algorithm? Same divide-and-conquer approach can be taken here.

boolean hasRepeatedElements(list v) 
    if v.length <= 1 return false;
    List less, greater;
    x = v[0];
    for each y in v, except v[0]
        if y == x
            return true;
        else if y < x
            less.add(y);
        else if y > x
            greater.add(y);
    end;
    return hasRepeatedElements(less) || hasRepeatedElements(greater);
end;

You can also add randomization to make algorithm statistically O(n*log(n)).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quicksort

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That's not using arrays... –  Tim Lloyd Jun 1 '10 at 1:53
4  
Pseudocode, @chi, pseudocode. –  BalusC Jun 1 '10 at 1:57
    
Maybe I'm supposed to use this approach. At least the quick-sort is part of this course's syllabus. –  devoured elysium Jun 1 '10 at 1:58
    
Mon Dieue - of course I can see that. It's just the question says "The method must have the following signature: boolean hasRepeatedElements(int[] v)". :) –  Tim Lloyd Jun 1 '10 at 2:02
1  
+1. The average time bounds for this match(or perhaps beat!) the worst case lower bound for this problem: Element Distinctness Problem, see: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Element_uniqueness_problem –  Aryabhatta Jun 1 '10 at 2:03
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I'm sure someone out there smarter than me could do this more efficiently, but at least it works.

bool hasRepeatedElements(int[] v)
        {
            if (v.Length > 1)
            {
                int[] subArray = new int[v.Length - 1];
                for (int i = 1; i < v.Length; i++)
                {
                    if (v[0] == v[i])
                        return true;
                    else
                        subArray[i - 1] = v[i];
                }
                return hasRepeatedElements(subArray);
            }

            return false;
        }
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Iterating would be quicker. Or using container class. Your way will work, but won't be very efficient. If this was C, instead of copying you could just call hadRepeatedElements(v + 1)

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You can sort and compare at the same time, since that's effectively what a sorting algorithm would be doing. If your sorting algorithm is recursive you win :)

boolean hasRepeatedElements(int[] v) {
  if (v.length <= 1) return false;
  boolean switched = false;
  int[] sub = new int[v.length];
  for (int i = 0; i < v.length; i++)
    sub[i] = v[i];
  for (int i = 0; i < sub.length - 1; i++) {
    if (sub[i] > sub[i + 1]) {
      switched = true;
      int temp = sub[i];
      sub[i] = sub[i + 1];
      sub[i + 1] = temp;
    } 
    else if (sub[i] == sub[i + 1]) return true;
  }
  if (!switched) return false; //We have not sorted the array and found zero dups

  return hasRepeatedElements(sub); //The recursive bit

}

If you think this looks hurried it is, I have a flight to catch. The basic principal is there, someone here could almost certainly refine the code :)

Hope that helps.

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If it must be recursive with that signature...

You could also sort the array and compare the first two elements. Then make a recursive call with elements [1..n].

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Yes, but as stated, I'd need to define another method, or at least another overload to do that. –  devoured elysium Jun 1 '10 at 1:59
    
Why? What would this other method do? –  Ken Jun 1 '10 at 2:44
    
I misread your post. So basically you're saying the same everyone else. –  devoured elysium Jun 1 '10 at 3:19
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If you do not like sorting, then this solution solves it without sorting. You should be able to make it much more efficient.

boolean hasRepeatedElements(int[] v) 
{
    if ( v . length <= 1 )
    {
        return ( false ) ;
    }
    int k = RANDOM . nextInt ( v . length ) ;
    int leftLength = v . length / 2 ;
    int [ ] left = new int [ leftLength ] ;
    int rightLength = v . length - l ;
    int [ ] rightLength = new int [ rightLength ] ;
    int i , l , r ;
    for ( i = 0 , l = 0 , r = 0 ; i < v . length ; i ++ )
    {
        if ( ( v [ i ] < v [ k ] ) & ( l < leftLength ) )
        {
            left [ l ] = v [ i ] ;
            l ++ ;
        }
        else if ( ( v [ i ] >= v [ k ] ) & ( r < rightLength ) )
        {
            right [ r ] = v [ i ] ;
            r ++ ;
        }
        else
        {
            return ( hasRepeatedElements ( v ) ) ;
        }
    }
    if ( hasRepeatedElements ( left ) ) { return ( true ) ; }
    if ( hasRepeatedElements ( right ) ) { return ( true ) ; }
    return ( false ) ;
}

This solution is not very efficient, but it uses recursion and it follows the method signature exactly.

static java . util . Random RANDOM = new java . util . Random ( ) ;

boolean hasRepeatedElements(int[] v) 
{
     int s = Random . nextInt ( v . length ) ;
     int t = Random . nextInt ( v . length ) ;
     int temp = v[s] ;
     v[s] = v[t] ;
     v[t] = temp ;
     for ( int i = 0 ; i < v . length - 1 ; i ++ )
     {
          if ( v[i]==v[i+1] ) { return true ; }
          else if ( v[i]>v[i+1] { return hasRepeatedElements ( v ) ; }
     }
     return false ;
}
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