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I'm trying to extract snippets of dialogue from a book text. For example, if I have the string

"What's the matter with the flag?" inquired Captain MacWhirr. "Seems all right to me."

Then I want to extract "What's the matter with the flag?" and "Seem's all right to me.".

I found a regular expression to use here, which is "[^"\\]*(\\.[^"\\]*)*". This works great in Eclipse when I'm doing a Ctrl+F find regex on my book .txt file, but when I run the following code:

String regex = "\"[^\"\\\\]*(\\\\.[^\"\\\\]*)*\"";
String bookText = "\"What's the matter with the flag?\" inquired Captain MacWhirr. \"Seems all right to me.\""; Pattern p = Pattern.compile(regex);
Matcher m = p.matcher(bookText);

if(m.find())
 System.out.println(m.group(1));

The only thing that prints is null. So am I not converting the regex into a Java string properly? Do I need to take into account the fact that Java Strings have a \" for the double quotes?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In a natural language text, it's not likely that " is escaped by a preceding slash, so you should be able to use just the pattern "([^"]*)".

As a Java string literal, this is "\"([^\"]*)\"".

Here it is in Java:

String regex = "\"([^\"]*)\"";
String bookText = "\"What's the matter with the flag?\" inquired Captain MacWhirr. \"Seems all right to me.\"";
Pattern p = Pattern.compile(regex);
Matcher m = p.matcher(bookText);

while (m.find()) {
    System.out.println(m.group(1));
}

The above prints:

What's the matter with the flag?
Seems all right to me.

On escape sequences

Given this declaration:

String s = "\"";
System.out.println(s.length()); // prints "1"

The string s only has one character, ". The \ is an escape sequence present at the Java source code level; the string itself has no slash.

See also


The problem with the original code

There's actually nothing wrong with the pattern per se, but you're not capturing the right portion. \1 isn't capturing the quoted text. Here's the pattern with the correct capturing group:

String regex = "\"([^\"\\\\]*(?:\\\\.[^\"\\\\]*)*)\"";
String bookText = "\"What's the matter?\" inquired Captain MacWhirr. \"Seems all right to me.\"";
Pattern p = Pattern.compile(regex);
Matcher m = p.matcher(bookText);

while (m.find()) {
    System.out.println(m.group(1));
}

For visual comparison, here's the original pattern, as a Java string literal:

String regex = "\"[^\"\\\\]*(\\\\.[^\"\\\\]*)*\""
                            ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
                           why capture this part?

And here's the modified pattern:

String regex = "\"([^\"\\\\]*(?:\\\\.[^\"\\\\]*)*)\""
                  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
                    we want to capture this part!

As mentioned before, though: this complicated pattern isn't necessary for natural language text, which isn't likely to contain escaped quotes.

See also

share|improve this answer
    
Hm, that seems to get everything in between dialogue snippets as well...I only want the dialogue itself. –  neptune Jun 1 '10 at 5:53
    
@sheldon: please consult the attached the Java code. I think you're confusing the regex pattern with the Java string literal. –  polygenelubricants Jun 1 '10 at 5:56
    
Your * is greedy. I think that's what @sheldon mean by it seems to get everything in between snippets. The correct one would be "([^"]*?)" –  Amarghosh Jun 1 '10 at 5:58
1  
@Amargosh: the negated character class makes greedy vs reluctant irrelevant: there can only be one match. –  polygenelubricants Jun 1 '10 at 6:10
1  
oops, you're right. –  Amarghosh Jun 1 '10 at 6:13
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