Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm currently modifying my regex for this:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2782031/extracting-email-addresses-in-an-html-block-in-ruby-rails

basically, im making another obfuscator that uses ROT13 by parsing a block of text for all links that contain a mailto referrer(using hpricot). One use case this doesn't catch is that if the user just typed in an email address(without turning it into a link via tinymce)

So here's the basic flow of my method: 1. parse a block of text for all tags with href="mailto:..." 2. replace each tag with a javascript function that changes this into ROT13 (using this script: http://unixmonkey.net/?p=20) 3. once all links are obfuscated, pass the resulting block of text into another function that parses for all emails(this one has an email regex that reverses the email address and then adds a span to that email - to reverse it back)

step 3 is supposed to clean the block of text for remaining emails that AREN'T in a href tags(meaning it wasn't parsed by hpricot). Problem with this is that the emails that were converted to ROT13 are still found by my regex. What i want to catch are just emails that WEREN'T CONVERTED to ROT13.

How do i do this? well all emails the WERE CONVERTED have a trailing "'.replace" in them. meaning, i need to get all emails WITHOUT that string. so far i have this regex:

/\b([A-Z0-9._%+-]+@[A-Z0-9.-]+.[A-Z]{2,4}('.replace))\b/i

but this gets all the emails with the trailing '.replace i want to get the opposite and I'm currently stumped with this. any help from regex gurus out there?

MORE INFO:

Here's the regex + the block of text im parsing:

http://www.rubular.com/r/NqXIHrNqjI

as you can see, the first two 'email addresses' are already obfuscated using ROT13. I need a regex that gets the emails ohhellzyeah@ribute.com and kaboom@yahoo.com

share|improve this question
    
If you give more examples what should be accepted and what should be rejected, that would help. I don't think my answer is quite there yet. –  polygenelubricants Jun 1 '10 at 6:57
    
because it gets the emails with the replace parts, meaning it catches the emails that were already encrypted. im catching all the emails that weren't encrypted –  corroded Jun 1 '10 at 6:58
    
@polygenelubricants: i've tried it using rubular but it still catches the emails that have '.replace here's the regex + the block of text im parsing: rubular.com/r/NqXIHrNqjI –  corroded Jun 1 '10 at 7:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

On negative lookaheads

You can use a negative lookahead to assert that a pattern doesn't match.

For example, the following regex matches all strings that doesn't end with ".replace" string:

^(?!.*\.replace$).*$

As another example, this regex matches all a*b*, except aabb:

^(?!aabb$)a*b*$

Ideally,

See also


Specific solution

The following regex works in this scenario: (see on rubular.com):

/\b([A-Z0-9._%+-]+@(?![A-Z0-9.-]*'\.replace\b)[A-Z0-9.-]+\.[A-Z]{2,4})\b/i
share|improve this answer
1  
Of course, the "appropriate" regex feature (for asserting that a string doesn't end in a certain way) would have been lookbehind, but Ruby doesn't support that, so this is the correct workaround. –  Tim Pietzcker Jun 1 '10 at 6:46
1  
thanks dude, that is one epic regex i couldn't have thought of(they are my weakness, sadly) –  corroded Jun 1 '10 at 9:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.