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function Player() {
  var score;

  this.getScore = function() { return score; }
  this.setScore = function(sc) { score = sc; }
}

function compare(playerA, playerB) {
  return playerA.getScore() - playerB.getScore();
}

var players = [];

players['player1'] = new Player();
players['player2'] = new Player();

Array(players).sort(compare);

I have code that is similar to the above. When I step through the code with a debugger, the compare function never gets called and the array isn't sorted. I'm not sure what's wrong with my code?

share|improve this question
    
the fact that it's 'similar' doesn't make it equivalent. There may be nothing wrong with the shown code fragment, but the difference may cause a problem. –  xtofl Jun 1 '10 at 7:08
    
This works only case of score value is integer!. You can do string compare and return -1,0 or 1 as well in compare method –  pramodc84 Jun 1 '10 at 7:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It's not sorting because you have specified the keys that the variables within the array belong on. Sorting will only move the objects on integer-valued keys. You should see your sorting work if you create your array as follow:

var players = [new Player(), new Player()];

though, of course, it won't be very effective since you have neither a score on which to sort or a method of identifying them. This'll do it:

function Player(name, score) {
  this.getName = function() { return name; }
  this.getScore = function() { return score; }
  this.setScore = function(sc) { score = sc; }
}

function comparePlayers(playerA, playerB) {
  return playerA.getScore() - playerB.getScore();
}

var playerA = new Player('Paul', 10);
var playerB = new Player('Lucas', 5);
var playerC = new Player('William', 7);

var players = [playerA, playerB, playerC];

for (var i = 0; i < players.length; i++)
    alert(players[i].getName() + ' - ' + players[i].getScore());

players.sort(comparePlayers);

for (var i = 0; i < players.length; i++)
    alert(players[i].getName() + ' - ' + players[i].getScore());

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
so there's no way to sort for associative arrays? –  tom Jun 1 '10 at 7:21
3  
It doesn't make sense to. By making them associative you have already sorted them yourself. What extra are you trying to achieve that is making you think you need an associative array? –  icio Jun 1 '10 at 8:38

you can also use like below:

var a = [];
a.push(obj1);
a.push(obj2);
a.sort(compare);

so you can use push method rather than an integer index

share|improve this answer

The main problem lies in this line:

Array(players).sort(compare);

Array(something) makes an array with something as its element.

console.log(Array(players)); //[[player1, player2]]

Use numeric indexed array instead of using object like array as in players['player1']

Run the following code (replace console.log with alert if you don't have Firebug).

function Player() {
  var score;
  //return this.score - else it returns undefined
  this.getScore = function() { return this.score; } 
  this.setScore = function(sc) { this.score = sc; }
}

function compare(playerA, playerB) {
  console.log("called " + playerA.getScore() + " " + playerB.score);
  //compare method should return 0 if equal, 1 if a > b and -1 if a < b
  return (playerA.getScore() == playerB.getScore()) ? 0 
     : ((playerA.getScore() > playerB.getScore()) ? 1 : -1);
}

var players = [];

players[0] = new Player();
players[1] = new Player();
players[2] = new Player();
players[3] = new Player();
players[0].setScore(9);
players[1].score = 14;
players[2].score = 11;
players[3].score = 10;
players.sort(compare);
console.log(players);//prints sorted array
share|improve this answer

It's probably because you don't have any "array values" inside your array - textual indexes are not regarded as array values but as object propertiest (arrays are "objects in disguise" in javascript). You can add as many properties to any object but array specific methods like sort take only "real" array members as their parameteres (i.e. only with numerical indexes)

var arr = new Array()
arr[0] = 1
arr[1] = 2
arr["textual_index"] = 3
alert(arr.length);

The last line alerts "2" not "3" since there are only two values with numeric indexes.

share|improve this answer
    
what if it were arr[textual_index] without the quotes. would that be textual indexes or "array values"? –  tom Jun 1 '10 at 7:16
    
without the quotes, textual_index will be treated as a variable called textual_index and it's value is passed between [ and ], so if the variable textual_value has numeric value, then it will be treated as an array memeber otherwise as a property of an object –  Andris Jun 1 '10 at 8:51

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