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What's a quick and easy way to cast an int to an enum in C#?

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6  
For the other way round: get-int-value-from-enum –  nawfal Jun 9 '13 at 11:53
7  
I could upvote it, but this number is too cabalistic for upvoting –  fotanus Oct 22 '13 at 16:35
1  
@fotanus Unfortunately for Peter, I immediately had the same thought. –  Brian MacKay Oct 22 '13 at 21:08
    
here's one way: dotnetquestions.weebly.com –  Uri Abramson Oct 25 '13 at 23:44
    
@Uri, the link is dead now. –  Daniel Gabriel Feb 27 at 22:28

16 Answers 16

up vote 1286 down vote accepted

From a string:

YourEnum foo = (YourEnum) Enum.Parse(typeof(YourEnum), yourString);

From an int:

YourEnum foo = (YourEnum)yourInt;

Update : From number you can also:

YourEnum foo = Enum.ToObject(typeof(YourEnum) , yourInt);
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37  
I found this little confusing, correct way should be: YourEnum foo = (YourEnum) Enum.Parse(typeof(YourEnum), yourString); –  Xorty Nov 15 '10 at 22:23
45  
Be aware that Enum.Parse will NOT work if your code is obfuscated. At run time after obfuscation the string is compared to the enum names, and at this point the names of the enums aren't what you would expect them to be. Your parse will fail where they succeeded before as a result. –  jropella Apr 26 '13 at 18:03
14  
BEWARE If you use the "from a string" syntax above and pass in an invalid string that is a number (e.g. "2342342" -- assuming that's not a value of your enum), it will actually allow that without throwing an error! Your enum will have that value (2342342) even though it's not a valid choice in the enum itself. –  JoeCool Jun 25 '13 at 15:14
10  
I think this answer is a bit dated now. For string, you should really be using var result = Enum.TryParse(yourString, out yourEnum) nowadays (and checking the result to determine if the conversion failed). –  Justin T Conroy Nov 26 '13 at 21:40
5  
It is also possible to have Enum.Parse be case-insensitive by adding a true parameter value to the call: YourEnum foo = (YourEnum) Enum.Parse(typeof(YourEnum), yourString, true); –  Erik Schierboom Feb 5 at 12:18

Just cast it:

MyEnum e = (MyEnum)3;

You can check if it's in range using Enum.IsDefined:

if (Enum.IsDefined(typeof(MyEnum), 3)) { ... }
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125  
Beware you can't use Enum.IsDefined if you use the Flags attribute and the value is a combination of flags for example: Keys.L | Keys.Control –  dtroy Jul 31 '09 at 4:49
6  
Good point, dtroy! +1! –  Matt Hamilton Jul 31 '09 at 4:51
7  
i know it's four years on but that's exactly what i was looking for! –  iagosabel May 4 '12 at 13:39
4  
@iagosabel Me too! Ain't StackOverflow grand ;-) –  Pandincus Jun 28 '12 at 14:35
1  
Regarding Enum.IsDefined, be aware that it can be dangerous: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229025(VS.90).aspx –  adrian Dec 4 '13 at 11:26

For those people stopping by who want to use as an extension method instead of the one liner answers:

public static T ToEnum<T>(this string enumString)
{
    return (T) Enum.Parse(typeof (T), enumString);
}

Usage :

Color colorEnum = "Red".ToEnum<Color>();

OR

string color = "Red";
var colorEnum = color.ToEnum<Color>();
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2  
Excellent. i am very interesting to learn Extension Method. +1 –  imdadhusen Mar 15 '12 at 12:18
2  
For processing user input, it's probably a good idea to call the overload of Enum.Parse that is allows you to specify that the comparison NOT be case sensitive (i.e. a user typing "red" (lowercase) would crash the above code without this change.) –  BrainSlugs83 Jun 4 '13 at 20:56
2  
Cool, except that it is not the question. –  nawfal Jun 8 '13 at 21:41
int one = 1;

MyEnum e = (MyEnum)one;
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I am using this piece of code to cast int to my enum:

if (typeof(YourEnum).IsEnumDefined(valueToCast)) return (YourEnum)valueToCast;
else { //handle it here, if its not defined }

I find it the best solution.

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Below is a nice utility class for Enums

public static class EnumHelper
{
    public static int[] ToIntArray<T>(T[] value)
    {
        int[] result = new int[value.Length];
        for (int i = 0; i < value.Length; i++)
            result[i] = Convert.ToInt32(value[i]);
        return result;
    }

    public static T[] FromIntArray<T>(int[] value) 
    {
        T[] result = new T[value.Length];
        for (int i = 0; i < value.Length; i++)
            result[i] = (T)Enum.ToObject(typeof(T),value[i]);
        return result;
    }


    internal static T Parse<T>(string value, T defaultValue)
    {
        if (Enum.IsDefined(typeof(T), value))
            return (T) Enum.Parse(typeof (T), value);

        int num;
        if(int.TryParse(value,out num))
        {
            if (Enum.IsDefined(typeof(T), num))
                return (T)Enum.ToObject(typeof(T), num);
        }

        return defaultValue;
    }
}
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If you're ready for the 4.0 .NET Framework, there's a new Enum.TryParse() function that's very useful and plays well with the [Flags] attribute. See Enum.TryParse Method (String, TEnum%)

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10  
That's useful when converting from a string. But not when converting from an int. –  CodesInChaos Nov 1 '11 at 15:08
2  
The accepted, upvoted 800+ times answer has the Enum.Parse method listed as its first example. This answer needs to be more visible. +1. –  Patrick M Aug 12 '13 at 21:30

If you have an integer that acts as a bitmask and could represent one or more values in a [Flags] enumeration, you can use this code to parse the individual flag values into a list:

for (var flagIterator = 0x1; flagIterator <= 0x80000000; flagIterator <<= 1)
{
    // Check to see if the current flag exists in the bit mask
    if ((intValue & flagIterator) != 0)
    {
        // If the current flag exists in the enumeration, then we can add that value to the list
        // if the enumeration has that flag defined
        if (Enum.IsDefined(typeof(MyEnum), flagIterator))
            ListOfEnumValues.Add((MyEnum)flagIterator);
    }
}
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For numeric values, this is safer as will return you an object no matter what:

public static class EnumEx
{
    static public bool TryConvert<T>(int value, out T result)
    {
        result = default(T);
        bool success = Enum.IsDefined(typeof(T), value);
        if (success)
        {
            result = (T)Enum.ToObject(typeof(T), value);
        }
        return success;
    }
}
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Sometimes you have an object to the MyEnum type. Like

var MyEnumType = typeof(MyEnumType);

Then:

Enum.ToObject(typeof(MyEnum), 3)
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I think to get a complete answer, people have to know how enums work internally in .NET.

How stuff works

An enum in .NET is a structure that maps a set of values (fields) to a basic type (the default is int). However, you can actually choose the integral type that your enum maps to:

public enum Foo : short

In this case the enum is mapped to the short data type, which means it will be stored in memory as a short and will behave as a short when you cast and use it.

If you look at it from a IL point of view, a (normal, int) enum looks like this:

.class public auto ansi serializable sealed BarFlag extends System.Enum
{
    .custom instance void System.FlagsAttribute::.ctor()
    .custom instance void ComVisibleAttribute::.ctor(bool) = { bool(true) }

    .field public static literal valuetype BarFlag AllFlags = int32(0x3fff)
    .field public static literal valuetype BarFlag Foo1 = int32(1)
    .field public static literal valuetype BarFlag Foo2 = int32(0x2000)

    // and so on for all flags or enum values

    .field public specialname rtspecialname int32 value__
}

What should get your attention here is that the value__ is stored separately from the enum values. In the case of the enum Foo above, the type of value__ is int16. This basically means that you can store whatever you want in an enum, as long as the types match.

At this point I'd like to point out that System.Enum is a value type, which basically means that BarFlag will take up 4 bytes in memory and Foo will take up 2 -- e.g. the size of the underlying type (it's actually more complicated than that, but hey...).

The answer

So, if you have an integer that you want to map to an enum, the runtime only has to do 2 things: copy the 4 bytes and name it something else (the name of the enum). Copying is implicit because the data is stored as value type - this basically means that if you use unmanaged code, you can simply interchange enums and integers without copying data.

To make it safe, I think it's a best practice to know that the underlying types are the same or implicitly convertible and to ensure the enum values exist (they aren't checked by default!).

To see how this works, try the following code:

public enum MyEnum : int
{
    Foo = 1,
    Bar = 2,
    Mek = 5
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var e1 = (MyEnum)5;
    var e2 = (MyEnum)6;

    Console.WriteLine("{0} {1}", e1, e2);
    Console.ReadLine();
}

Note that casting to e2 also works! From the compiler perspective above this makes sense: the value__ field is simply filled with either 5 or 6 and when Console.WriteLine calls ToString(), the name of e1 is resolved while the name of e2 is not.

If that's not what you intended, use Enum.IsDefined(typeof(MyEnum), 6) to check if the value you are casting maps to a defined enum.

Also note that I'm explicit about the underlying type of the enum, even though the compiler actually checks this. I'm doing this to ensure I don't run into any surprises down the road. To see these surprises in action, you can use the following code (actually I've seen this happen a lot in database code):

public enum MyEnum : short
{
    Mek = 5
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var e1 = (MyEnum)32769; // will not compile, out of bounds for a short

    object o = 5;
    var e2 = (MyEnum)o;     // will throw at runtime, because o is of type int

    Console.WriteLine("{0} {1}", e1, e2);
    Console.ReadLine();
}
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Different ways to cast to and from Enum

enum orientation : byte
{
 north = 1,
 south = 2,
 east = 3,
 west = 4
}

class Program
{
  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
    orientation myDirection = orientation.north;
    Console.WriteLine(“myDirection = {0}”, myDirection); //output myDirection =north
    Console.WriteLine((byte)myDirection); //output 1

    string strDir = Convert.ToString(myDirection);
        Console.WriteLine(strDir); //output north

    string myString = “north”; //to convert string to Enum
    myDirection = (orientation)Enum.Parse(typeof(orientation),myString);


 }
}
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enter image description here

To convert a string to ENUM or int to ENUM constant we need to use Enum.Parse function. Here is a youtube video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4nhx4VwdRDk which actually demonstrate's with string and the same applies for int.

The code goes as shown below where "red" is the string and "MyColors" is the color ENUM which has the color constants.

MyColors EnumColors = (MyColors)Enum.Parse(typeof(MyColors), "Red");
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In my case, I needed to return the enum from a WCF service. I also needed a friendly name, not just the enum.ToString().

Here's my WCF Class.

[DataContract]
public class EnumMember
{
    [DataMember]
    public string Description { get; set; }

    [DataMember]
    public int Value { get; set; }

    public static List<EnumMember> ConvertToList<T>()
    {
        Type type = typeof(T);

        if (!type.IsEnum)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("T must be of type enumeration.");
        }

        var members = new List<EnumMember>();

        foreach (string item in System.Enum.GetNames(type))
        {
            var enumType = System.Enum.Parse(type, item);

            members.Add(
                new EnumMember() { Description = enumType.GetDescriptionValue(), Value = ((IConvertible)enumType).ToInt32(null) });
        }

        return members;
    }
}

Here's the Extension method that gets the Description from the Enum.

    public static string GetDescriptionValue<T>(this T source)
    {
        FieldInfo fileInfo = source.GetType().GetField(source.ToString());
        DescriptionAttribute[] attributes = (DescriptionAttribute[])fileInfo.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false);            

        if (attributes != null && attributes.Length > 0)
        {
            return attributes[0].Description;
        }
        else
        {
            return source.ToString();
        }
    }

Implementation:

return EnumMember.ConvertToList<YourType>();
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Slightly getting away from the original question, but I found this SO post useful; create a static class with public const int properties, allowing you to easily collect together a bunch of related int constants, and then not have to cast them to int when using them.

public static class Question
{
    public static readonly int Role = 2;
    public static readonly int ProjectFunding = 3;
    public static readonly int TotalEmployee = 4;
    public static readonly int NumberOfServers = 5;
    public static readonly int TopBusinessConcern = 6;
}

Obviously some of the enum type functionality will be lost, but for storing a bunch of database id constants, it seems like a pretty tidy solution.

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This parses integers or strings to a target enum with partial matching in dot.NET 4.0 using generics like in Tawani's utility class above. I am using it to convert command-line switch variables which may be incomplete. Since an enum cannot be null, you should logically provide a default value. It can be called like this:

var result = EnumParser<MyEnum>.Parse(valueToParse, MyEnum.FirstValue);

Here's the code:

using System;

public class EnumParser<T> where T : struct
{
    public static T Parse(int toParse, T defaultVal)
    {
        return Parse(toParse + "", defaultVal);
    }
    public static T Parse(string toParse, T defaultVal) 
    {
        T enumVal = defaultVal;
        if (defaultVal is Enum && !String.IsNullOrEmpty(toParse))
        {
            int index;
            if (int.TryParse(toParse, out index))
            {
                Enum.TryParse(index + "", out enumVal);
            }
            else
            {
                if (!Enum.TryParse<T>(toParse + "", true, out enumVal))
                {
                    MatchPartialName(toParse, ref enumVal);
                }
            }
        }
        return enumVal;
    }

    public static void MatchPartialName(string toParse, ref T enumVal)
    {
        foreach (string member in enumVal.GetType().GetEnumNames())
        {
            if (member.ToLower().Contains(toParse.ToLower()))
            {
                if (Enum.TryParse<T>(member + "", out enumVal))
                {
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

FYI: The question was about integers, which nobody mentioned will also explicitly convert in Enum.TryParse()

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