Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have read this manual: http://git-scm.com/docs/gitignore

As I am working with gitosis, I rather use a .gitignore than explicit git commands. Thus says the manual:

Of course, not tracking files with git is just a matter of not calling git add on them. But it quickly becomes annoying to have these untracked files lying around; e.g. they make git add . practically useless, and they keep showing up in the output of git status.

You can tell git to ignore certain files by creating a file called .gitignore in the top level of your working directory

I basically want to ignore everything, except two directories, recursively. Let's say /mywebapp (that contains two subdirectories like stylesheets and javascripts) and /mydata are those two directories. Now, I've been already told git does not track directories, but just files. The !-mark excludes, so I assume this could work with directories too. I figured out that using * would ignore everything else. How would I write up my .gitignore file?

My question is not how to add these directories manually by explicit adding. My question is how this is done inside a gitignore file.

Thanks for your help, comments and feedback.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, the '*' is delegated to the fnmatch function which doesn't always works the same on all platform.

With my msysgit, I manage to ignore all subdirectories content except one with

*/
!mySubDir

So in your case:

*/
!mywebapp 
!mydata

To use '*' (instead of '*/') is a bit too much in this instance: it would ignore all files and directories...

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, thanks! – Shyam Jun 1 '10 at 9:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.