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Suppose I have UTF-8 content stored in memory, how do I read the characters using a pointer? I presume I need to watch for the 8th bit indicating a multi-byte character, but how exactly do I turn the sequence into a valid Unicode character? Also, is wchar_t the proper type to store a single Unicode character?

This is what I have in mind:


   wchar_t readNextChar (char*& p)
   { 
       wchar_t unicodeChar;
       char ch = *p++;

       if ((ch & 128) != 0)
       {
           // This is a multi-byte character, what do I do now?
           // char chNext = *p++; 
           // ... but how do I assemble the Unicode character?   
           ...
       }
       ...
       return unicodeChar;
   }  

share|improve this question
3  
It doesn't make sense to speak of the "width of a Unicode character". You need to settle for an encoding. Depending on your platform, wchar_t might be of different size. On a Unix-like OS it's typically 32bit, so you can store UTF-32 encoded Unicode characters in it, on Windows it's 16bit, so it can take UTF-16 encoded Unicode characters. –  sbi Jun 1 '10 at 8:47
    
In addition to returning the wide character, your readNextChar function must provide information to properly update p. UTF-8 (and UTF-16, for that matter) are variable length encodings and your caller cannot assume a constant or simple increment in the pointer. –  mpez0 Jun 12 '10 at 22:13
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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You have to decode the UTF-8 bit pattern to its unencoded UTF-32 representation. If you want the actual Unicode codepoint, then a wchar_t is NOT large enough to hold it, you have to use an unsigned int/long instead, ie:

#define IS_IN_RANGE(c, f, l)    (((c) >= (f)) && ((c) <= (l)))

u_long readNextChar (char*& p) 
{  
    // TODO: since UTF-8 is a variable-length
    // encoding, you should pass in the input
    // buffer's actual byte length so that you
    // can determine if a malformed UTF-8
    // sequence would exceed the end of the buffer...

    u_char c1, c2, *ptr = (uchar*) p;
    u_long uc = 0;
    int seqlen;
    // int datalen = ... available length of p ...;    

    /*
    if( datalen < 1 )
    {
        // malformed data, do something !!!
        return (u_long) -1;
    }
    */

    c1 = ptr[0];

    if( (c1 & 0x80) == 0 )
    {
        uc = (u_long) (c1 & 0x7F);
        seqlen = 1;
    }
    else if( (c1 & 0xE0) == 0xC0 )
    {
        uc = (u_long) (c1 & 0x1F);
        seqlen = 2;
    }
    else if( (c1 & 0xF0) == 0xE0 )
    {
        uc = (u_long) (c1 & 0x0F);
        seqlen = 3;
    }
    else if( (c1 & 0xF8) == 0xF0 )
    {
        uc = (u_long) (c1 & 0x07);
        seqlen = 4;
    }
    else
    {
        // malformed data, do something !!!
        return (u_long) -1;
    }

    /*
    if( seqlen > datalen )
    {
        // malformed data, do something !!!
        return (u_long) -1;
    }
    */

    for(int i = 1; i < seqlen; ++i)
    {
        c1 = ptr[i];

        if( (c1 & 0xC0) != 0x80 )
        {
            // malformed data, do something !!!
            return (u_long) -1;
        }
    }

    switch( seqlen )
    {
        case 2:
        {
            c1 = ptr[0];

            if( !IS_IN_RANGE(c1, 0xC2, 0xDF) )
            {
                // malformed data, do something !!!
                return (u_long) -1;
            }

            break;
        }

        case 3:
        {
            c1 = ptr[0];
            c2 = ptr[1];

            if( ((c1 == 0xE0) && !IS_IN_RANGE(c2, 0xA0, 0xBF)) ||
                ((c1 == 0xED) && !IS_IN_RANGE(c2, 0x80, 0x9F)) ||
                (!IS_IN_RANGE(c1, 0xE1, 0xEC) && !IS_IN_RANGE(c1, 0xEE, 0xEF)) )
            {
                // malformed data, do something !!!
                return (u_long) -1;
            }

            break;
        }

        case 4:
        {
            c1 = ptr[0];
            c2 = ptr[1];

            if( ((c1 == 0xF0) && !IS_IN_RANGE(c2, 0x90, 0xBF)) ||
                ((c1 == 0xF4) && !IS_IN_RANGE(c2, 0x80, 0x8F)) ||
                !IS_IN_RANGE(c1, 0xF1, 0xF3) )
            {
                // malformed data, do something !!!
                return (u_long) -1;
            }

            break;
        }
    }

    for(int i = 1; i < seqlen; ++i)
    {
        uc = ((uc << 6) | (u_long)(ptr[i] & 0x3F));
    }

    p += seqlen;
    return unicodeChar; 
}

Use a wchar_t only when dealing with UTF-16 codeunits instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, thanks! –  Tony the Pony Jun 2 '10 at 4:59
    
@Remy & @Jen: The exact width of wchar_t is not defined. On GCC (at least on Linux) wchar_t is 32bit, so it would certainly be enough to hold Unicode characters without multi-byte encoding them. –  sbi Jun 4 '10 at 20:41
    
I just compiled this code using g++ 3.3.4, and I'm pretty impressed: The compiler moved all the code from the large switch statement up to where the seqlen variable gets set. Maybe that would be good for the original code, too, to become more readable. –  Roland Illig Jun 12 '10 at 20:22
    
@sbi: It's 16-bit in MSVC, and the Windows API expects 16-bit, pretty much enforcing 16-bit in Windows programming. –  Puppy Jun 12 '10 at 20:27
1  
@DeadMG: I'm must be missing your psychic abilities to draw these conclusions from the question. –  sbi Jun 12 '10 at 21:07
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Here is a quick macro that will count UTF-8 bytes

#define UTF8_CHAR_LEN( byte ) (( 0xE5000000 >> (( byte >> 3 ) & 0x1e )) & 3 ) + 1

This will help you detect the size of the UTF-8 character for easier parsing.

share|improve this answer
    
Helpfull! Fast way to replace mblen(), when it doesn't work. –  southerton Mar 22 '11 at 12:44
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If you need to decode UTF-8 you need do develop an UTF-8 parser. UTF-8 is a variable-length encoding (1 to 4 bytes) so you really have to write a parser that is compliant with the standard : see wikipedia for example.

If you do not want to write your own parser, I suggest to use a library. You will find that in glib for example (I personnaly have used Glib::ustring, the C++ wrapper of glib) but also in any good general purpose library.

Edit:

I think that C++0x will include UTF-8 support too, but I'm no specialist...

my2c

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Also, is wchar_t the proper type to store a single Unicode character?

On Linux, yes. On Windows, wchar_t represents a UTF-16 code unit, which isn't necessarily a character.

The upcoming C++0x standard will provide the char16_t and char32_t types designed to represent UTF-16 and UTF-32.

If on a system where char32_t is unavailable and wchar_t is inadequate, use uint32_t to store Unicode characters.

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This is my solution, in pure ANSI-C, including a unit test for the corner cases.

Beware that int must be at least 32 bits wide. Otherwise you have to change the definition of codepoint.

#include <assert.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef unsigned char byte;
typedef unsigned int codepoint;

/**
 * Reads the next UTF-8-encoded character from the byte array ranging
 * from {@code *pstart} up to, but not including, {@code end}. If the
 * conversion succeeds, the {@code *pstart} iterator is advanced,
 * the codepoint is stored into {@code *pcp}, and the function returns
 * 0. Otherwise the conversion fails, {@code errno} is set to
 * {@code EILSEQ} and the function returns -1.
 */
int
from_utf8(const byte **pstart, const byte *end, codepoint *pcp) {
        size_t len, i;
        codepoint cp, min;
        const byte *buf;

        buf = *pstart;
        if (buf == end)
                goto error;

        if (buf[0] < 0x80) {
                len = 1;
                min = 0;
                cp = buf[0];
        } else if (buf[0] < 0xC0) {
                goto error;
        } else if (buf[0] < 0xE0) {
                len = 2;
                min = 1 << 7;
                cp = buf[0] & 0x1F;
        } else if (buf[0] < 0xF0) {
                len = 3;
                min = 1 << (5 + 6);
                cp = buf[0] & 0x0F;
        } else if (buf[0] < 0xF8) {
                len = 4;
                min = 1 << (4 + 6 + 6);
                cp = buf[0] & 0x07;
        } else {
                goto error;
        }

        if (buf + len > end)
                goto error;

        for (i = 1; i < len; i++) {
                if ((buf[i] & 0xC0) != 0x80)
                        goto error;
                cp = (cp << 6) | (buf[i] & 0x3F);
        }

        if (cp < min)
                goto error;

        if (0xD800 <= cp && cp <= 0xDFFF)
                goto error;

        if (0x110000 <= cp)
                goto error;

        *pstart += len;
        *pcp = cp;
        return 0;

error:
        errno = EILSEQ;
        return -1;
}

static void
assert_valid(const byte **buf, const byte *end, codepoint expected) {
        codepoint cp;

        if (from_utf8(buf, end, &cp) == -1) {
                fprintf(stderr, "invalid unicode sequence for codepoint %u\n", expected);
                exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }

        if (cp != expected) {
                fprintf(stderr, "expected %u, got %u\n", expected, cp);
                exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
}

static void
assert_invalid(const char *name, const byte **buf, const byte *end) {
        const byte *p;
        codepoint cp;

        p = *buf + 1;
        if (from_utf8(&p, end, &cp) == 0) {
                fprintf(stderr, "unicode sequence \"%s\" unexpectedly converts to %#x.\n", name, cp);
                exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
        *buf += (*buf)[0] + 1;
}

static const byte valid[] = {
        0x00, /* first ASCII */
        0x7F, /* last ASCII */
        0xC2, 0x80, /* first two-byte */
        0xDF, 0xBF, /* last two-byte */
        0xE0, 0xA0, 0x80, /* first three-byte */
        0xED, 0x9F, 0xBF, /* last before surrogates */
        0xEE, 0x80, 0x80, /* first after surrogates */
        0xEF, 0xBF, 0xBF, /* last three-byte */
        0xF0, 0x90, 0x80, 0x80, /* first four-byte */
        0xF4, 0x8F, 0xBF, 0xBF /* last codepoint */
};

static const byte invalid[] = {
        1, 0x80,
        1, 0xC0,
        1, 0xC1,
        2, 0xC0, 0x80,
        2, 0xC2, 0x00,
        2, 0xC2, 0x7F,
        2, 0xC2, 0xC0,
        3, 0xE0, 0x80, 0x80,
        3, 0xE0, 0x9F, 0xBF,
        3, 0xED, 0xA0, 0x80,
        3, 0xED, 0xBF, 0xBF,
        4, 0xF0, 0x80, 0x80, 0x80,
        4, 0xF0, 0x8F, 0xBF, 0xBF,
        4, 0xF4, 0x90, 0x80, 0x80
};

int
main() {
        const byte *p, *end;

        p = valid;
        end = valid + sizeof valid;
        assert_valid(&p, end, 0x000000);
        assert_valid(&p, end, 0x00007F);
        assert_valid(&p, end, 0x000080);
        assert_valid(&p, end, 0x0007FF);
        assert_valid(&p, end, 0x000800);
        assert_valid(&p, end, 0x00D7FF);
        assert_valid(&p, end, 0x00E000);
        assert_valid(&p, end, 0x00FFFF);
        assert_valid(&p, end, 0x010000);
        assert_valid(&p, end, 0x10FFFF);

        p = invalid;
        end = invalid + sizeof invalid;
        assert_invalid("80", &p, end);
        assert_invalid("C0", &p, end);
        assert_invalid("C1", &p, end);
        assert_invalid("C0 80", &p, end);
        assert_invalid("C2 00", &p, end);
        assert_invalid("C2 7F", &p, end);
        assert_invalid("C2 C0", &p, end);
        assert_invalid("E0 80 80", &p, end);
        assert_invalid("E0 9F BF", &p, end);
        assert_invalid("ED A0 80", &p, end);
        assert_invalid("ED BF BF", &p, end);
        assert_invalid("F0 80 80 80", &p, end);
        assert_invalid("F0 8F BF BF", &p, end);
        assert_invalid("F4 90 80 80", &p, end);

        return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Epic fail. The poster is in C++, and you violated so many C++ idioms, I can't even begin to count. –  Puppy Jun 12 '10 at 20:28
    
So I will count for you. (1) I included the C headers instead of the C++ headers. (2) I used pointers instead of references. (3) I did not use namespaces, but instead declared my functions static. (4) I declared the loop variable with a function-wide scope. But on the other hand, I didn't invent weird type names (u_long, u_char) and used them inconsistently (u_char vs. uchar) and without declaring them. I also managed to completely avoid any type cast (which the accepted answer uses a lot, and that's C-style, too.) –  Roland Illig Jun 12 '10 at 20:36
    
And by the way, my use of pointers instead of references is completely intentional in this case, since pstart and end would otherwise look very similar on the caller's side. from_utf8(start, end, &cp). How should anyone guess that start gets modified and end doesn't? –  Roland Illig Jun 12 '10 at 20:39
    
@Roland: Erm, by looking at the function's signature? @DeadMG: To be fair, this was announced to be an C solution. –  sbi Jun 12 '10 at 21:06
1  
@DeadMG: At least I wouldn't complain that your Lua solution is bad C++ code. (I would, however, complain about the fact my C++ compiler can't compile it.) –  sbi Jun 13 '10 at 0:45
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