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I have a table like this:

<table>
    <tfoot>
        <tr><td>footer</td></tr>
    </tfoot>
    <tbody>
        <tr><td>Body 1</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 1</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 1</td></tr>
    </tbody>
    <tbody>
        <tr><td>Body 2</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 2</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 2</td></tr>
    </tbody>
    <tbody>
        <tr><td>Body 3</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 3</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 3</td></tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

I'd like to put some spacing between each tbody element, but padding and margin have no effect. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Is is right to repeat 'tbody' tags? What I have seen always is all the "<tr>..</tr>" are inside a single "tbody' tag. –  Saneef Mar 10 '09 at 19:39
15  
Yes this is valid. The spec says: <!ELEMENT TABLE - - (CAPTION?, (COL*|COLGROUP*), THEAD?, TFOOT?, TBODY+)> meaning that there has to be one or more tbodies. w3.org/TR/html4/struct/tables.html#h-11.2.1 –  nickf Mar 11 '09 at 1:40

10 Answers 10

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Try this, if you don't mind not having borders.

<style>
table {
  border-collapse: collapse;
}

table tbody {
  border-top: 15px solid white;
}
</style>

<table>
    <tfoot>
        <tr><td>footer</td></tr>
    </tfoot>
    <tbody>
        <tr><td>Body 1</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 1</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 1</td></tr>
    </tbody>
    <tbody>
        <tr><td>Body 2</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 2</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 2</td></tr>
    </tbody>
    <tbody>
        <tr><td>Body 3</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 3</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 3</td></tr>
    </tbody>
</table>
share|improve this answer
4  
interesting approach! I'd just change it to "15px solid transparent", so it works anywhere. This behaves slightly strangely though: it only shifts the body down half the width of the border. –  nickf Nov 17 '08 at 5:30
2  
oh, bad news: this doesn't work at all in IE7 –  nickf Nov 17 '08 at 5:40
    
Doesn't work in IE. –  Lotus Notes Jul 2 '10 at 23:06
1  
I'm confused. If the border-collapse is set to collapse then how can the border-width be 15? Shouldn't it be overridden to 0? –  chharvey Oct 14 '12 at 18:49
    
Does not work if your tbody has colored border –  artworkad シ Apr 24 at 13:52

Something like this will work, depending on your browser support requirements:

tbody::before
{
  content: '';
  display: block;
  height: 15px;

}
share|improve this answer
    
This is the only solution that works when your cells have a background that the space should not have. –  Laradda Jun 11 '12 at 12:48
    
This worked well for me. Are there any drawbacks? Also, why two colons? –  nh2 Apr 25 '13 at 5:51
    
Great solution. Keeps everything accessible! –  Jason T Featheringham Dec 18 '13 at 21:44
    
not working in safari. have you any solution ? –  Sandy Apr 23 at 9:10

People will always have controversial opinions about using empty table elements to layout a page (as evidenced by this answer's downvote). I recognize this, but sometimes its easier to use them this way when you are working in a "quick and dirty" way.

I've used empty rows in past projects to space groups of table rows. I assigned the spacer rows a css class of their own and defined a height for that class that acted as a top and bottom margin for that group of table rows.

    .separator{
             height: 50px;
    }

   <table>
           <tr><td>Cell 1</td><td>Cell 2</td></tr>
           <tr><td>Cell 1</td><td>Cell 2</td></tr>
           <tr><td>Cell 1</td><td>Cell 2</td></tr>

           <tr class="separator" colspan="2"></tr>

           <tr><td>Cell 1</td><td>Cell 2</td></tr>
           <tr><td>Cell 1</td><td>Cell 2</td></tr>
           <tr><td>Cell 1</td><td>Cell 2</td></tr>

           <tr class="separator" colspan="2"></tr>

           tr><td>Cell 1</td><td>Cell 2</td></tr>
           <tr><td>Cell 1</td><td>Cell 2</td></tr>
           <tr><td>Cell 1</td><td>Cell 2</td></tr>
   </table>

If you don't have borders on your table cells, you could also define a height to your typical cell or row in your style sheet that evenly spaces out all rows of your table.

tr{
   height: 40px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
well if you're going to be adding extra markup, why not just put a class on the first row of each tbody? –  nickf Nov 17 '08 at 23:28
    
Well, that could be because the rows are generated code, and adding a separate row in the markup might be more maintainable than creating a special case for the first row of generated content. –  Rolf Rander Jan 6 '09 at 10:08
8  
Downvote all you want, but this is the only solution without drawbacks -- and even if it does violate seperation, an empty row isn't that big of a deal IMO. –  Xkeeper Dec 15 '11 at 17:49
1  
Without drawbacks, my butt! Try using a screenreader on this and notice the incorrect row counts. Better yet, try copying and pasting the table into a spreadsheet. You'll be reformatting for hours if you have a lot of content. Tables are meant to display data (and be extremely accessible), not shim presentation between sections. –  Jason T Featheringham Dec 18 '13 at 21:41
    
this is awesome :D –  artworkad シ Apr 24 at 13:56

Here's another possibility that relies on :first-child which is not available in all browsers:

<style>
table {
  border-collapse: collapse;
}

td {
  border: 1px solid black;
}

tbody tr:first-child td {
  padding-top: 15px;
}

</style>

<table>
    <tfoot>
        <tr><td>footer</td></tr>
    </tfoot>
    <tbody>
        <tr><td>Body 1</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 1</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 1</td></tr>
    </tbody>
    <tbody>
        <tr><td>Body 2</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 2</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 2</td></tr>
    </tbody>
    <tbody>
        <tr><td>Body 3</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 3</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 3</td></tr>
    </tbody>
</table>
share|improve this answer
1  
This one won't work very well if you have anything that happens to rely on the position of the content relative to the size of the cell, like box-shadow, background images, or pretty much anything else. –  Xkeeper Dec 15 '11 at 17:37

Of all of the answers given above, only djenson47's answers retain separation of presentation and content. The drawback of the collapsed border model method is that you can no longer use the table's border or cellspacing attributes to separate the individual cells. You could argue that this is a good thing, and there are some workarounds, but it can be a pain. So I think the first-child method is the most elegant.

Alternatively, you could also set your TBODY class' overflow property to anything other than "visible." This method allows you to retain a separated borders model as well:

<style>
tbody {
    overflow: auto;
    border-top: 1px solid transparent;
}
</style>
<table>
    <tfoot>
        <tr><td>footer</td></tr>
    </tfoot>
    <tbody>
        <tr><td>Body 1</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 1</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 1</td></tr>
    </tbody>
    <tbody>
        <tr><td>Body 2</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 2</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 2</td></tr>
    </tbody>
    <tbody>
        <tr><td>Body 3</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 3</td></tr>
        <tr><td>Body 3</td></tr>
    </tbody>
</table>
share|improve this answer
    
I was looking to do something similar, this is perfect for me –  Eruant Jul 10 '12 at 8:03

Because padding can be applied to TD's, you can do a trick with the + sign. Then it will be possible to give a top padding to the TD's of the first TR of a tbody:

// The first row will have a top padding
table tbody + tbody tr td {
    padding-top: 20px;
}

// The rest of the rows should not have a padding
table tbody + tbody tr + tr td {
    padding-top: 0px;
}

I have added the "tbody + tbody" so the first tbody won't have a top padding. However, it's not required.

As far as I know there are no drawbacks :), though didn't test the older browsers.

share|improve this answer

NEW ANSWER

You can use as many <tbody> tags as you like. I didn't realize that was ok by W3C until now. Not to say my below solution doesn't work (it does), but to do what you're trying to do, assign your <tbody> tags classes and then reference their individual <td> tags through CSS like so:

table tbody.yourClass td {
    padding: 10px;
}

and your HTML thusly:

<table> 
<tbody>
<tr><td>Text</td></tr>
<tr><td>Text</td></tr>
<tr><td>Text</td></tr>
</tbody>
<tbody class="yourClass">    
<tr><td>Text</td></tr>
<tr><td>Text</td></tr>
<tr><td>Text</td></tr>
</tbody>
<tbody>
<tr><td>Text</td></tr>
<tr><td>Text</td></tr>
<tr><td>Text</td></tr>
</tbody>
</table>

Try that guy out :)

OLD ANSWER

whatever you do, DON'T insert blank rows...

you shouldn't have more than 1 tbody element in your table. what you can do is set the class or id attribute in your <tr> elements and give their corresponding <td> tags padding:

table {
    border-collapse: collapse;
}

tr.yourClass td {
    padding: 10px;
}

You can even assign the top and bottom <tr>'s an additional class so that they only do top or bottom padding, respectively:

tr.yourClass.topClass td {
    padding: 10px 0 0 0;
}

tr.yourClass.bottomClass td {
    padding: 0 0 10px 0;
}

and in your HTML, your <tr> tag would look like this:

<table> 
<tbody>
<tr><td>Text</td></tr>
<tr><td>Text</td></tr>
<tr><td>Text</td></tr>
<tr class="yourClass topClass"><td>Text</td></tr>
<tr class="yourClass"><td>Text</td></tr>
<tr class="yourClass bottomClass"><td>Text</td></tr>
<tr><td>Text</td></tr>
<tr><td>Text</td></tr>
<tr><td>Text</td></tr>
</tbody>
</table>

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

You can use border-spacing in a table with table row groups to add a space between those groups. Though, I don't think there is a way to specify which groups are spaced and which are not.

<table>
  <thead>
    ...
  </head>
  <tbody>
    ...
  </tbody>
  <tbody>
    ...
  </tbody>
  <tfoot>
    ...
  </tfoot>
</table>

CSS

table {
  border-spacing: 0px 10px; /* h-spacing v-spacing */
}
share|improve this answer

djensen47 answer works great for newer browsers, however, as it was pointed out, IE7 it does not work in.

My workaround for this issue to support the older browsers was to wrap each cells contents inside a div. Then add a margin-top to the div.

<table class="tbl">
<tr></tr>
<tr></tr>
<tr></tr>
<tr><td><div></div></td></tr>
</table>

CSS

.tbl tr td div {
    height:30px;
    margin-top:20px;
}

The height setting keeps the cells at least 30px high to prevent any cell coloring used inside the div from collapsing around the text. The margin-top creates the desired space by making the entire row taller.

share|improve this answer

Just set display as block and it will work.

table tbody{
    display:block;
    margin-bottom:10px;
    border-radius: 5px;
}
share|improve this answer

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