Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the book "Introduction to Algorithms", second edition, there is the following problem:

Suppose we have some array:

int a[] = {1,2,3,4}

and some random priorities array:

P = {36,3,97,19}

and the goal is to permute the array a randomly using this priorities array.

This is the pseudo code:

PERMUTE-BY-SORTING (A)
1 n ← length[A]
2 for i ← 1 to n
3      do P[i] = RANDOM (1, n 3)
4 sort A, using P as sort keys
5 return A

The result should be the permuted array:

B={2, 4, 1, 3};

I have written this code:

import java.util.*;

public class Permute {

    public static void main (String[] args) {
        Random r = new Random();
        int a[] = new int[] {1,2,3,4};
        int n = a.length;
        int b[] = new int[a.length];
        int p[] = new int[a.length];
        for (int i=0; i<p.length; i++) {
            p[i] = r.nextInt(n*n*n) + 1;
        }

        // for (int i=0;i<p.length;i++){
        // System.out.println(p[i]);
        //}
    }
}

How do I continue?

share|improve this question
2  
What are you asking? Do you not understand how the result is attained? Do you not understand how to write the code to attain the result? What? –  James Morris Jun 1 '10 at 10:48
    
how result is attained i dont understand –  dato datuashvili Jun 1 '10 at 10:50
    
Please note that it's strongly discouraged to post homework questions and just ask for a solution. That's not the point of homework, and disrespectful to other users. Please explain how far you got with your solution, and where exactly you got stuck; then you'll probably get help. –  sleske Jun 1 '10 at 10:50
1  
Also see info about homework questions: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/10811/… –  sleske Jun 1 '10 at 10:51
    
and also how implement code? –  dato datuashvili Jun 1 '10 at 10:51
show 5 more comments

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not sure which part you're having trouble with, but essentially this is what happened:

int[] a = {  1,  2,  3,  4 };
int[] p = { 36,  3, 97, 19 };

However you think about it, essentially we want to "zip" the elements of these two lists together. So at the abstract level, we have the following:

Pair<int,int> zipped = { ( 1,36), ( 2, 3), ( 3,97), ( 4,19) };

Now we sort zipped by the second value in the Pair. Whatever sorting algorithm works; it doesn't really matter.

zipped = { ( 2, 3), ( 4,19), ( 1,36), ( 3,97) };

We then unzip the pairs to get the permuted a:

a = {  2,  4,  1,  3 };
p = {  3, 19, 36, 97 };

How to implement

The zip-into-Pair-then-unzip works just fine. Otherwise, you can modify the sorting algorithm so that whenever it moves elements of p[i] to p[j], it also moves a[i] to a[j] to keep both arrays "in-sync".


Java snippet

In the following snippet, the priorities array is hardcoded to the above values. You already figured out how to seed it with random numbers.

import java.util.*;

public class PermuteBySorting {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        class PrioritizedValue<T> implements Comparable<PrioritizedValue<T>> {
            final T value;
            final int priority;
            PrioritizedValue(T value, int priority) {
                this.value = value;
                this.priority = priority;
            }
            @Override public int compareTo(PrioritizedValue other) {
                return Integer.valueOf(this.priority).compareTo(other.priority);
            }           
        }
        int[] nums = { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
        int[] priorities = { 36, 3, 97, 19 };
        final int N = nums.length;
        List<PrioritizedValue<Integer>> list =
            new ArrayList<PrioritizedValue<Integer>>(N);
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
            list.add(new PrioritizedValue<Integer>(nums[i], priorities[i]));
        }
        Collections.sort(list);
        int[] permuted = new int[N];
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
            permuted[i] = list.get(i).value;
        }
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(permuted));
        // prints "[2, 4, 1, 3]"
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks polygenelubricants but does not exist more simple algorithm ?i think it is very big code then it is necessary –  dato datuashvili Jun 1 '10 at 13:08
    
This is a clean solution, sure a simpler one does exist but in this case I don't think it should be preferred. –  Esko Jun 1 '10 at 13:13
1  
@davit: You can always just use Collections.shuffle. –  polygenelubricants Jun 1 '10 at 13:14
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.