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Will null instanceof SomeClass return false or throw a NullPointerException

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It's also 'important' or at least very useful as a 'best-practise' starting(or very early) line for for any Compare or Equals or similar method that is designed to only succeed on non-null objects of the same type, and guards you against the 'silly cases' in a single line. less code = less bugs. – Timo Aug 15 '13 at 9:47
5  
To weigh in on the "is this useful?" debate - I've never written my own Java code (so don't easily know where the specs are, and compiling a test would be very non-trivial), but I'm currently manually converting Java to JavaScript. My code was failing on a null reference, and googling this let me see the accepted answer, which confirmed that it was expected behavior and that I was missing an implicit null check. Very useful, in my case. – Scott Mermelstein Aug 27 '13 at 15:31
    
The answers here save time. Reading all the comments ... – Adrian May 8 '14 at 5:42
8  
> A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer. – Kenju Aug 21 '15 at 0:30
up vote 906 down vote accepted

No, a null check is not needed before using instanceof.

The expression x instanceof SomeClass is false if x is null.

From the Java Language Specification, at http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-15.html#jls-15.20.2

"At run time, the result of the instanceof operator is true if the value of the RelationalExpression is not null and the reference could be cast (§15.16) to the ReferenceType without raising a ClassCastException. Otherwise the result is false."

So if the operand is null, the result is false.

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196  
This answer is more correct than try it because current behavior is not the same as guaranteed behavior. – Luke Jan 8 '13 at 19:08
1  
This question comes into play during Joshua Bloch's chapter on object equality in Effective Java - amazon.com/Effective-Java-Edition-Joshua-Bloch/dp/0321356683 – Kevin Meredith Nov 21 '13 at 13:57
6  
Specifically, in Item 8, he notes that in equals() methods, one instanceof operator serves two purposes - it verifies that the argument is both non-null and of the correct type. "...[S]o you don't need a separate null check." – Andy Thomas Nov 21 '13 at 14:40
    
I don't see them ever changing this. It can only return true or false so how can can it ever be true for a null reference to be an instanceof anything? – Ben Thurley Aug 3 '15 at 10:19
1  
@BenThurley - Java's instanceof operator was part of Java 1.0, released almost 20 years ago. Changing the behavior now in a way that would break existing code is unlikely, absent some benefit that outweighs that huge cost. Twenty years ago, maybe there could have been arguments for returning true iff the argument could be cast, or throwing an exception for a null argument. But those definitions would have required separate null checks. – Andy Thomas Aug 3 '15 at 13:59

returns false.

(It takes 1 minute to try it)

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67  
(And now it takes 10 seconds to find this question in Google) – PL_kolek Sep 23 '15 at 5:31
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@PL_kolek: I second that. Why get distracted from the task at hand, if you can quickly verify with Google? I for example, am in the middle of a massive refactoring, and I don't want to set up a test on the side. – paulkore Oct 30 '15 at 6:30

Very good question indeed. I just tried for myself.

public class IsInstanceOfTest {

    public static void main(final String[] args) {

        String s;

        s = "";

        System.out.println((s instanceof String));
        System.out.println(String.class.isInstance(s));

        s = null;

        System.out.println((s instanceof String));
        System.out.println(String.class.isInstance(s));
    }
}

Prints

true
true
false
false

JLS / 15.20.2. Type Comparison Operator instanceof

At run time, the result of the instanceof operator is true if the value of the RelationalExpression is not null and the reference could be cast to the ReferenceType without raising a ClassCastException.

Otherwise the result is false.

API / Class#isInstance(Object)

If this Class object represents an interface, this method returns true if the class or any superclass of the specified Object argument implements this interface; it returns false otherwise.

If this Class object represents a primitive type, this method returns false.

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No, it's not. instanceof would return false if its first operand is null.

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The instanceOf operator does not need explicit null checks, as it does not throw a null pointer exception if the operand is null.

At run time, the result of the instanceOf operator is true if the value of the relational expression is not null and the reference could be cast to the reference type without raising a class cast exception.

If the operand is null, the instanceOf operator returns false and hence, explicit null checks are not required.

Consider the below example,

public static void main(String[] args) {
         if(lista != null && lista instanceof ArrayList){                     //Violation
                    System.out.println("In if block");
         }
         else
            {
                 System.out.println("In else block");
            }
        }

The correct usage of instanceOf is as shown below,

public static void main(String[] args) {
      
         if(lista instanceof ArrayList){                     //Correct way
                  System.out.println("In if block");
         }
            else
          {
                 System.out.println("In else block");
         }
     }
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Java literal null is not an instance of any class. Therefore it can not be an instanceof any class. instanceof returns only false or true therefore the <referenceVariable> instanceof <SomeClass> returns false when referenceVariable value is null.

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protected by Gilbert Le Blanc Jul 29 '13 at 12:10

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