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I want to grep an environment variable

env | grep ABC_IJK[1,2]

currenlty defined variables are like this

ABC_IJK1=123
ABC_IJK1_XYZ=sn123:345
ABC_IJK2=999
ABC_IJK2_XYZ=sn321:999

I only want to get only this

ABC_IJK1=123
ABC_IJK2=999

get number of connections sum them(not 123 + 999) and save in N1 (this one has 2 connection)

so N1=2

get number of connections sum them and save in N2 for other machine (if this have four)

so N2=4

If the value is not there or the variable is not present then N1=1 for below:

ABC_IJK1=
ABC_IJK2=123

Then need to compare it with a MAX_CONNECTION variable

Thanks

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closed as not a real question by rene, dSquared, Filburt, andrewsi, Pent Ploompuu Oct 1 '12 at 18:06

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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have you at least attempted to solve this yourself, or are you asking us to do you job (homework?) for you? –  Bryan Oakley Jun 1 '10 at 14:17
    
I can write a whole script for this .... but i thought if you can provide me a line to do this then I will learn.. –  Kimi Jun 1 '10 at 14:23
    
I suggest writing a script. Any one-liner someone may come up with won't be very easy to understand, especially if it does everything you want. –  Bryan Oakley Jun 1 '10 at 21:01
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1 Answer 1

N1 = $(grep -c '^ABC_IJK[12]=[0-9][0-9]*$')

will set the correct N1, I think: the [0-9] forces at least a digit, and the rest ensures only digits until the end. I am assuming that ABC_IJK1 and ABC_IJK2 are the only values you're interested in. grep -c counts the number of matches, which is all you want.

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