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If I were to define two objects myDataStore and myDrawer something like this:

var myDataStore = function(myObjectRef) {
    this.myInternalObject = myObjectRef;
};

var myDrawer = function(myObjRef) {
    this.myInternalObject = myObjectRef;
};

And if I were to create an object like so:

[[EDIT - Adjusted Object Creation to Ensure 'this' is being mapped to myObject, not the global window object]]

(function(){
  var myObject = window.myObject = function(){
      this.dataStore = new myDataStore(this);
      this.drawer = new myDrawer(this);
  }
 })();

Then myObject.dataStore.myInternalObject, and myObject.drawer.myInternalObject, would simply be pointers back to the original 'myObject' - not taking up any additional memory in the browser. Yes?

I am interested in implementing techniques like this - as it makes it easy for objects to communicate with each other.

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Sorry I really shouldn't have made that mistake on how I was creating myObject - my confusion isn't with handling the scope of 'this' but with whether or not JavaScript is going to create an additional copy of myObject inside of the myObject.dataStore and myObject.drawer, or is it just going to be a reference to the myObject object - which is what I think it does –  John Jun 1 '10 at 15:13
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, your assumption is correct. myInternalObject will be a reference and not a new object. You can test it like this:

var MyDataStore = function(myObjectRef) {
    this.myInternalObject = myObjectRef;
};

var data = {
    value: "value"
};
var dataStore = new MyDataStore(data);
data.value = "test";
console.log(dataStore.myInternalObject);  // logs { value : "test" } instead of { value: "value" }
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No. myObject.dataStore.myInternalObject and myObject.drawer.myInternalObject will both point to the global object (mapped to window in browsers), unless you're inside a function already when you declare myObject. In other words, it will be set to whatever this is in the context in which you declare myObject. It won't be myObject itself.

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Ah yes of course, let me amend the code sample to more accurately get to my question. –  John Jun 1 '10 at 15:08
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Nope. this refers to whatever is on the left hand side of the . or if there is no left hand side of the . then it's the global object.

So if you did this:

var MyObj = {
   "create": function() {
      var myObject = {
         dataStore = new myDataStore(this);
         drawer = new myDrawer(this);
      }; 
   }
}; 
MyObj.create();

this would be MyObj. If you did this:

var myObject = {
   dataStore = new myDataStore(this);
   drawer = new myDrawer(this);
}; 

(not in a function) this would be window (assuming this is in a browser).

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