Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C#, what makes a field different from a property, and when should a field be used instead of a property?

share|improve this question
2  
Microsoft directly answers this question (for all .NET languages) as part of its Member Design Guidelines‌​. For specifics see the articles Property Design and Field Design. Note there is a distinction between instance members and static members. –  DavidRR Jan 2 at 19:12
1  
Properties, fields, and methods. Oh my! and Why properties matter are two useful posts that explain when you should use properties vs fields. –  Steven Wexler May 13 at 22:29

18 Answers 18

up vote 215 down vote accepted

Properties expose fields. Fields should (almost always) be kept private to a class and accessed via get and set properties. Properties provide a level of abstraction allowing you to change the fields while not affecting the external way they are accessed by the things that use your class.

public class MyClass
{
    // this is a field.  It is private to your class and stores the actual data.
    private string _myField;

    // this is a property.  When you access it uses the underlying field, but only exposes
    // the contract that will not be affected by the underlying field
    public string MyField
    {
        get
        {
            return _myField;
        }
        set
        {
            _myField = value;
        }
    }
}

@Kent points out that Properties are not required to encapsulate fields, they could do a calculation on other fields, or serve other purposes.

@GSS points out that you can also do other logic, such as validation, when a property is accessed, another useful feature.

share|improve this answer
21  
It's worth noting that properties are not required to encapsulate fields. There could be no field at all behind the property. It might be a calculation or return a constant or whatever. –  Kent Boogaart Nov 17 '08 at 10:18
1  
"while not affecting the external way they are accessed by the things that use your class." forgive me if I'm incorrectly understanding, then, but why the need for access modifiers in front of properties at all, if the field behind it seems to handle this? i.e. why make a property anything other than public? –  Chucky Jun 20 at 11:01
    
@Chucky I asked a similar question in Java, that might apply here. Question –  McAdam331 Dec 22 at 15:23

Object orientated programming principles say that, the internal workings of a class should be hidden from the outside world. If you expose a field you're in essence exposing the internal implementation of the class. Therefore we wrap fields with Properties (or methods in Java's case) to give us the ability to change the implementation without breaking code depending on us. Seeing as we can put logic in the Property also allows us to perform validation logic etc if we need it. C# 3 has the possibly confusing notion of autoproperties. This allows us to simply define the Property and the C#3 compiler will generate the private field for us.

public class Person
{
   private string _name;

   public string Name
   {
      get
      {
         return _name;
      }
      set
      {
         _name = value;
      }
   }
   public int Age{get;set;} //AutoProperty generates private field for us
}
share|improve this answer
14  
+1 for mentioning autoproperties - I think this is something many of the answers here (and elsewhere) have forgotten to bring in. Without this explanation, it can still be pretty hard to grasp what public int myVar { get; set; } really stands for (and I presume that it's the reason for at least 50% of the hits this question gets). –  Priidu Neemre Oct 24 '13 at 8:48
1  
+1 also for mentioning auto, and mentioning how it works ("AutoProperty generates private field for us") This was the answer I've been looking for to a question I had. When researching I didn't see on MSDN's page about them any indication that a private field was created and was causing confusion. I guess that's what this means? "Attributes are permitted on auto-implemented properties but obviously not on the backing fields since those are not accessible from your source code. If you must use an attribute on the backing field of a property, just create a regular property." but wasn't sure. –  alykins Jul 18 at 14:05

I'll give you a couple examples of using properties that might get the gears turning:

  • Lazy Initialization: If you have a property of an object that's expensive to load, but isn't accessed all that much in normal runs of the code, you can delay its loading via the property. That way, it's just sitting there, but the first time another module tries to call that property, it checks if the underlying field is null - if it is, it goes ahead and loads it, unknown to the calling module. This can greatly speed up object initialization.
  • Dirty Tracking: Which I actually learned about from my own question here on StackOverflow. When I have a lot of objects which values might have changed during a run, I can use the property to track if they need to be saved back to the database or not. If not a single property of an object has changed, the IsDirty flag won't get tripped, and therefore the saving functionality will skip over it when deciding what needs to get back to the database.
share|improve this answer
    
A question about dirty tracking: what if I could change the field directly– I don't know if that can be done, I could say: "the object does not need to be saved if not a single FIELD of an object has changed" thus dirty tracking would not be a difference, am I missing something? –  juanpastas Dec 10 '12 at 17:29
    
@juanpastas: The advantage of properties with regard to dirty tracking is that if property setters will set a "dirty" flag, then in the scenario where the flag isn't set code won't have to inspect the values of any properties to see if they might have changed. By contrast, if an object exposes its attributes as fields, then the contents of all fields must be compared against the previous value (which not only adds time to do the comparison, but also means the code must have the previous value). –  supercat May 7 '13 at 6:31

An important difference is that interfaces can have properties but not fields. This, to me, underlines that properties should be used to define a class's public interface while fields are meant to be used in the private, internal workings of a class. As a rule I rarely create public fields and similarly I rarely create non-public properties.

share|improve this answer
1  
Great point in this answer. –  Beton Jul 28 at 10:10

Using Properties, you can throw an event, when the value of the property is changed (aka. PropertyChangedEvent) or before the value is changed to support cancelation.

This is not possible with (direct access to) fields.

public class Person {
 private string _name;

 public event EventHandler NameChanging;     
 public event EventHandler NameChanged;

 public string Name{
  get
  {
     return _name;
  }
  set
  {
     OnNameChanging();
     _name = value;
     OnNameChanged();
  }
 }

 private void OnNameChanging(){
   EventHandler localEvent = NameChanging;
   if (localEvent != null) {
     localEvent(this,EventArgs.Empty);
   }
 }

 private void OnNameChanged(){
   EventHandler localEvent = NameChanged;
   if (localEvent != null) {
     localEvent(this,EventArgs.Empty);
   }
 }
}
share|improve this answer

Properties have the primary advantage of allowing you to change the way data on an object is accessed without breaking it's public interface. For example, if you need to add extra validation, or to change a stored field into a calculated you can do so easily if you initially exposed the field as a property. If you just exposed a field directly, then you would have to change the public interface of your class to add the new functionality. That change would break existing clients, requiring them to be recompiled before they could use the new version of your code.

If you write a class library designed for wide consumption (like the .NET Framework, which is used by millions of people), that can be a problem. However, if you are writing a class used internally inside a small code base (say <= 50 K lines), it's really not a big deal, because no one would be adversely affected by your changes. In that case it really just comes down to personal preference.

share|improve this answer

Properties support asymmetric access, i.e. you can have either a getter and a setter or just one of the two. Similarly properties support individual accessibility for getter/setter. Fields are always symmetric, i.e. you can always both get and set the value. Exception to this is readonly fields which obviously cannot be set after initialization.

Properties may run for a very long time, have side effects, and may even throw exceptions. Fields are fast, with no side effects, and will never throw exceptions. Due to side effects a property may return a different value for each call (as may be the case for DateTime.Now, i.e. DateTime.Now is not always equal to DateTime.Now). Fields always return the same value.

Fields may be used for out / ref parameters, properties may not. Properties support additional logic – this could be used to implement lazy loading among other things.

Properties support a level of abstraction by encapsulating whatever it means to get/set the value.

Use properties in most / all cases, but try to avoid side effects.

share|improve this answer
    
Fields may have all the cost issues of properties when the data type of the field is an object with a conversion operator overload - it's a subtle gotcha. –  Andy Dent Jan 14 '09 at 0:16
    
Properties should never have side effects. Even the debugger assumes it can evaluate them safely. –  Strilanc Jun 26 '09 at 6:44
    
@Strilanc: I agree completely, however, that is not always the case. As for the debugger, there are many problems with FuncEval if that is what you're talking about. –  Brian Rasmussen Jun 26 '09 at 10:25

In the background a property is compiled into methods. So a Name property is compiled into get_Name() and set_Name(string value). You can see this if you study the compiled code. So there is a (very) small performance overhead when using them. Normally you will always use a Property if you expose a field to the outside, and you will often use it internally if you need to do validation of the value.

share|improve this answer

DIFFERENCES - USES (when and why)

A field is a variable that is declared directly in a class or struct. A class or struct may have instance fields or static fields or both. Generally, you should use fields only for variables that have private or protected accessibility. Data that your class exposes to client code should be provided through methods, properties and indexers. By using these constructs for indirect access to internal fields, you can guard against invalid input values.

A property is a member that provides a flexible mechanism to read, write, or compute the value of a private field. Properties can be used as if they are public data members, but they are actually special methods called accessors. This enables data to be accessed easily and still helps promote the safety and flexibility of methods. Properties enable a class to expose a public way of getting and setting values, while hiding implementation or verification code. A get property accessor is used to return the property value, and a set accessor is used to assign a new value.

share|improve this answer

When you want your private variable(field) to be accessible to object of your class from other classes you need to create properties for those variables.

for example if I have variables named as "id" and "name" which is private but there might be situation where this variable needed for read/write operation outside of the class. At that situation , property can help me to get that variable to read/write depending upon the get/set defined for the property. A property can be a readonly / writeonly / readwrite both.

here is the demo

class Employee
{
    // Private Fields for Employee
    private int id;
    private string name;

    //Property for id variable/field
    public int EmployeeId
    {
       get
       {
          return id;
       }
       set
       {
          id = value;
       }
    }

    //Property for name variable/field
    public string EmployeeName
    {
       get
       {
          return name;
       }
       set
       {
          name = value;
       }
   }
}

class MyMain
{
    public static void Main(string [] args)
    {
       Employee aEmployee = new Employee();
       aEmployee.EmployeeId = 101;
       aEmployee.EmployeeName = "Sundaran S";
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you are going to use thread primitives you are forced to use fields. Properties can break your threaded code. Apart from that, what cory said is correct.

share|improve this answer
    
since when? lock your backing field within the property and it's the equivilant –  Sekhat Nov 17 '08 at 14:42
1  
Properties are methods, and are not inlined by any CIL JIT today. If you are going to use thread primitives like Interlocked you need to have fields. Check your sources. Admittedly 'locking' was the wrong word to use. –  Jonathan C Dickinson Nov 24 '08 at 7:34

We can take a realtime example from .Net. We might have seen datatable.Rows.Count property while coding. Even though it has "Global" access, we can only read from it. How is it possible? The answer is through "Properties".

// Assume Count be the name of property for datatable.Rows.Count
public int Count
{
     get { return _count ; }
     private set { _count = value; }
}

// Assume _count be the name of field for datatable.Rows.Count
private int _count;

// Assume method to get values to _count
private int GetDataTableRowsCount()
{
   // Calculation to get Datatable rows count
}

So if you want your variable to be of Global type and readonly, you can use "Properties" with "Fields" as private.

share|improve this answer

properties can be bound to controls but fields (even if they are public) cannot be bound to controls

Unlike fields, properties are not classified as variables. Therefore, it is not possible to pass a property as a ref (C# Reference) or out (C# Reference) parameter. But a property can be used as a read only value or read-write value using the protected or private or internal keywords.

share|improve this answer

Properties encapsulate fields, thus enabling you to perform additional processing on the value to be set or retrieved. It is typically overkill to use properties if you will not be doing any pre- or postprocessing on the field value.

share|improve this answer
1  
no, I always use properties, it allows you the flexibility of changing the implementation at anytime without breaking your API. –  Sekhat Nov 17 '08 at 14:39
    
Regarding API evolution, you can use fields for private data without problems. Also in odd cases where you want to share data within an assembly you can give fields 'internal' access. –  Daniel Earwicker Nov 17 '08 at 14:59

Also, properties allow you to use logic when setting values.

So you can say you only want to set a value to an integer field, if the value is greater than x, otherwise throw an exception.

Really useful feature.

share|improve this answer

(This should really be a comment, but I can't post a comment, so please excuse if it is not appropriate as a post).

I once worked at a place where the recommended practice was to use public fields instead of properties when the equivalent property def would just have been accessing a field, as in :

get { return _afield; }
set { _afield = value; }

Their reasoning was that the public field could be converted into a property later in future if required. It seemed a little strange to me at the time. Judging by these posts, it looks like not many here would agree either. What might you have said to try to change things ?

Edit : I should add that all of the code base at this place was compiled at the same time, so they might have thought that changing the public interface of classes (by changing a public field to a property) was not a problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Since C# 3.0, the pattern described here is conveniently supported by a feature called Auto-Implemented Properties. –  DavidRR Jan 2 at 19:03

Technically, i don't think that there is a difference, because properties are just wrappers around fields created by the user or automatically created by the compiler.The purpose of properties is to enforce encapsuation and to offer a lightweight method-like feature. It's just a bad practice to declare fields as public, but it does not have any issues.

share|improve this answer

IMO, Properties are just the "SetXXX()" "GetXXX()" functions/methods/interfaces pairs we used before, but they are more concise and elegant.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.