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I've got a conditional compilation symbol I'm using called "RELEASE", that I indicated in my project's properties in Visual Studio. I want some particular CSS to be applied to elements when the RELEASE symbol is defined, and I was trying to do that from the view, but it doesn't seem to be working.

My view code looks like this (shortened a bit for demo purposes):

<% #if (RELEASE) %>
    <div class="releaseBanner">Banner text here</div>
<% #else %>
    <div class="debugBanner">Banner text here</div>
<% #endif %>

With this code, and with the RELEASE symbol set, the 'else' code is running and I'm getting a div with the debugBanner class. So it doesn't seem to think that RELEASE is defined. It's worth noting that my actual C# code in .cs files is recognizing RELEASE and runs the correct code. It's only the view that is giving me the problem.

Does anyone have any insight into this? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

Clarification: I should have mentioned that this view is already a partial view, and I'll simply render it in pages where I need it. That's because these banners will be on certain pages and not others. So even when rendering it as a partial view via:

Html.RenderPartial("BannerView");

it's not working.

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3  
Why don't you create a html helper method and put your code in there? You can then do the if and do a render partial to keep the HTML –  Rippo Jun 1 '10 at 15:43
    
Not too familiar with html helper methods. I did clarify my question to indicate that this is a partial view I'm working with. Can you elaborate a bit on your suggestion? –  Matt Powell Jun 1 '10 at 15:47
1  
preprocessor directives only work @ compile-time... @DeveloperArt has an elegant solution... –  alexfreiria Jun 1 '10 at 15:53
    
Adding the keyword "constant" to this page so it gets returned for searches for "compiler constants". (hopefully) –  G-Wiz Apr 8 '11 at 20:24
    
See: stackoverflow.com/a/8325519/204699 for another alternative to using conditional compilation in views. –  João Angelo Nov 30 '11 at 12:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In your model:

bool isRelease = false;

<% #if (RELEASE) %>
    isRelease = true;
<% #endif %>

In your view:

<% if (Model.isRelease) { %>
    <div class="releaseBanner">Banner text here</div>
<% } else { %>
    <div class="debugBanner">Banner text here</div>
<% } %>
share|improve this answer
    
I'm gathering from this answer that it's not possible to check compilation symbols from a view, and that is must be done from a .cs file. Is this true? –  Matt Powell Jun 1 '10 at 15:52
    
Nice solution, but what about placing this logic in a base controller that all Controllers inherit. Then you could have access of this property through all Controllers... –  alexfreiria Jun 1 '10 at 15:56
    
well, not sure that would completely work xander. To have access to it from the view, we would need a Model with that property, not a Controller with that property. So I'd really have to pass that same Model from multiple controllers and render that view, which would be sort of a pain. –  Matt Powell Jun 1 '10 at 16:01
    
If you place that logic in a base controller and access it from a derived controller then you could assign it to ViewData or some custom ViewModel –  alexfreiria Jun 1 '10 at 16:04
    
So actually, what I'm going to do is set a property in one of our Global files, which should solve the problem. Same general principle as Develop Art's solution, but slightly tweaked. Thanks for the responses. –  Matt Powell Jun 1 '10 at 16:13

I recently discovered that you can simply test:

HttpContext.Current.IsDebuggingEnabled

in Views, which saves you checking symbols in other parts of your app.

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1  
This is the best approach, IMO. –  Ed DeGagne Jan 6 at 19:02
1  
Shouldn't you use this.Context.IsDebuggingEnabled instead? Really only applicable if you've mocked the context or somehow used razor views outside of a webapp –  drzaus Aug 5 at 16:30

A better, more generic solution is to use an extension method, so all views have access to it:

public static bool IsReleaseBuild(this HtmlHelper helper)
{
#if DEBUG
    return false;
#else
    return true;
#endif
}

You can then use it like follows in any view (razor syntax):

@if(Html.IsReleaseBuild())
...
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That's awesome method! thanks for sharing! –  trailmax Aug 8 '12 at 13:39
1  
of course, the caveat is that it depends on where this method is -- if it's in a shared library that has been compiled in release mode, it'll return false when included in a project compiled in debug mode. –  drzaus Aug 5 at 16:39
@if (HttpContext.Current.IsDebuggingEnabled)
{
    // Debug mode enabled. Your code here. Texts enclosed with <text> tag
}
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Below is the Razor syntax for conditional compiler directives. It loads the developer version of jquery when DEBUG variable is set in VS profile or web.config. Otherwise the min version is loaded.

@{#if (DEBUG) 
    <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.6/jquery.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jqueryui/1.8.12/jquery-ui.js"></script>

#else 
    <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.6/jquery.min.js"></script>
   <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jqueryui/1.8.12/jquery-ui.min.js"></script>
#endif
}
share|improve this answer
    
don't think this will work since the views aren't compiled and if(DEBUG) is a compiler directive? –  Tom Aug 3 '12 at 9:45
    
That does not work in Razor. That is exactly what the original question about. –  trailmax Aug 8 '12 at 13:41

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