Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a producer-consumer pattern working for one product. What is the best implementation when the producer produce many products? For example a DataBaseEvent, GuiEvent and ControlEvent that the consumer shall consume. The code below shows the pattern for one product (a DataBaseEvent). Should each event type be enqueued on an own queue or should the events inherit a base class that can be enqueued. Maybe there exist a better pattern when working with many event types?

class DataBaseEventArgs : EventArgs
{
    public string textToDB = "";
}

class Consumer
{
    private Producer mProducer = new Producer();
    private Queue<DataBaseEventArgs> mDataBaseEventQueue = new Queue<DataBaseEventArgs>();
    private static EventWaitHandle mDataBaseEventWaitHandle = new EventWaitHandle(false, EventResetMode.ManualReset);
    private Thread mDataBaseEventDequeueThread = null;

    public Consumer()
    {
        mDataBaseEventDequeueThread = new Thread(DataBaseDequeueEvent);
        mDataBaseEventDequeueThread.Start();
        mProducer.mDataBaseEventHandler += WhenDataBaseEvent;
    }

    protected void DataBaseDequeueEvent()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            DataBaseEventArgs e;
            lock (((ICollection)mDataBaseEventQueue).SyncRoot)
            {
                if (mDataBaseEventQueue.Count > 0)
                {
                    e = mDataBaseEventQueue.Dequeue();
                }
            }
            // WriteToDatabase(e.textToDB);
            if (mDataBaseEventQueue.Count == 0)
            {
                mDataBaseEventWaitHandle.WaitOne(1000);
                mDataBaseEventWaitHandle.Reset();
            }
        }
    }

    internal void WhenDataBaseEvent(object sender, DataBaseEventArgs e)
    {
        lock (((ICollection)mDataBaseEventQueue).SyncRoot)
        {
            mDataBaseEventQueue.Enqueue(e);
            mDataBaseEventWaitHandle.Set();
        }
    }
}

class Producer
{
    public event EventHandler<DataBaseEventArgs> mDataBaseEventHandler = null;

    public void SendDataBaseEvent()
    {
        if (mDataBaseEventHandler != null)
        {
            DataBaseEventArgs e = new DataBaseEventArgs();
            e.textToDB = "This text will be written to DB";
            mDataBaseEventHandler(this, e);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

Multiple queues would be useful if you want to actively separate the work - i.e. have different threads/pools for different types of event. If you want to share the load, there is another option - use an interface (rather than a base-class). Base-class is fine, but I can't think of anything that would mandate a base-class over an interface. Or even just a delegate to the work to do!

Also - I'm not sure you need a reset event in this case; you can often handle producer/consumer with just lock and Monitor.Pulse / Wait (which has less overhead, as no OS-objects are involved - just managed objects). However, if the code is currently stable, perhaps leave "as is" - threading is hard enough to get right once, let alone twice...

But for reference, it would be something like:

while(true) {
    T item;
    lock(lockObj) {
        if(queue.Count == 0) { // empty
            Monitor.Wait(lockObj);
            continue; // ensure there is genuinely something to do
        }
        item = queue.Dequeue();
    }
    // TODO: process item
}
...
void Add(T item) {
    lock(lockObj) {
        queue.Enqueue(item);
        if(queue.Count == 1) { // first
            Monitor.PulseAll(lockObj);
        }
    }
}

(and remember to PulseAll when clearing down the queues)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for monitor code sample. I think that I will use that instead of the EventWaitHandler. – humcfc Nov 17 '08 at 13:39

I think that it would be better enqueue all of the request to one queue if they have the same priority and will be handled in similar way.

If one of the requests has higher probability, then either you need some fancy priority queue or you can use different queues.

Also, if you process the messages in a different way, then there is no point to overcomplicate the pattern.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.