Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I recently upgraded a C# project from .NET 3.5 to .NET 4. I have a method that extracts all MSTest test methods from a given list of MethodBase instances. Its body looks like this:

return null == methods || methods.Count() == 0
    ? null
    : from method in methods
      let testAttribute = Attribute.GetCustomAttribute(method,
          typeof(TestMethodAttribute))
      where null != testAttribute
      select method;

This worked in .NET 3.5, but since upgrading my projects to .NET 4, this code always returns an empty list, even when given a list of methods containing a method that is marked with [TestMethod]. Did something change with custom attributes in .NET 4?

Debugging, I found that the results of GetCustomAttributesData() on the test method gives a list of two CustomAttributeData which are described in Visual Studio 2010's 'Locals' window as:

  1. Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting.DeploymentItemAttribute("myDLL.dll")
  2. Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting.TestMethodAttribute() -- this is what I'm looking for

When I call GetType() on that second CustomAttributeData instance, however, I get {Name = "CustomAttributeData" FullName = "System.Reflection.CustomAttributeData"} System.Type {System.RuntimeType}. How can I get TestMethodAttribute out of the CustomAttributeData, so that I can extract test methods from a list of MethodBases?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Have you tried using

method.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(TestMethodAttribute), false)

instead? Asking the target for the custom attributes has usually been the way I've gone about fetching them.

Here's a hasty example:

using System;
using System.Linq;

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.All)]
public class FooAttribute : Attribute {}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var query = typeof(Test).GetMethods()
            .Where(method => method.GetCustomAttributes(
                              typeof(FooAttribute), false).Length != 0);

        foreach (var method in query)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(method);
        }
    }

    [Foo]
    public static void MethodWithAttribute1() {}

    [Foo]
    public static void MethodWithAttribute2() {}

    public static void MethodWithoutAttribute() {}

}
share|improve this answer
    
yes, and I've tried passing true so it checks ancestors, too. I always get back an empty array of objects. –  Sarah Vessels Jun 1 '10 at 17:51
    
@Sarah: In that case, please post a short but complete program demonstrating the problem. I've shown an example which does work. –  Jon Skeet Jun 1 '10 at 17:52
    
false alarm! My project was referencing the old .NET 3.5/VS 2008 version of the UnitTestFramework library. Switching to the .NET 4/VS 2010 version of UnitTestFramework (10.0.0.0) fixed the problem. –  Sarah Vessels Jun 1 '10 at 18:08
    
@Sarah: Ah, right - so the reflection attribute type wasn't the same as the one on the methods... –  Jon Skeet Jun 1 '10 at 18:14
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Silly mistake on my part: my test-method-extracting method was in a Class Library project that referenced Microsoft.VisualStudio.QualityTools.UnitTestFramework so that it could look for TestMethodAttribute as a custom attribute. When I upgraded my Solution from VS 2008 to VS 2010, the conversion process automatically updated references from Microsoft.VisualStudio.QualityTools.UnitTestFramework, Version=9.0.0.0 to Microsoft.VisualStudio.QualityTools.UnitTestFramework, Version=10.0.0.0 in my test projects. It did not update the reference in my Class Library project, however, so that was still pointing to the old UnitTestFramework reference. When I changed that project to point to the 10.0.0.0 library, my code below worked as expected:

return null == methods || methods.Count() == 0
    ? null
    : from method in methods
      let testAttribute = Attribute.GetCustomAttribute(method,
          typeof(TestMethodAttribute))
      where null != testAttribute
      select method;

Also, the code Jon suggested worked as well, once I updated the reference.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.