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In Python, is there a way to ping a server through ICMP and return TRUE if the server responds, or FALSE if there is no response?

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1  
related: Ping a site in Python? – J.F. Sebastian Nov 2 '12 at 13:49

15 Answers 15

If you don't need to support Windows, here's a really concise way to do it:

import os
hostname = "google.com" #example
response = os.system("ping -c 1 " + hostname)

#and then check the response...
if response == 0:
  print hostname, 'is up!'
else:
  print hostname, 'is down!'

This works because ping returns a non-zero value if the connection fails. (The return value actually differs depending on the network error.) You could also change the ping timeout (in seconds) using the '-t' option. Note, this will output text to the console.

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13  
I ended up with this variant response = os.system("ping -c 1 -w2 " + hostname + " > /dev/null 2>&1") – Manuel Gutierrez Aug 13 '13 at 21:27
    
@ManuelGutierrez: why did you use that variant? – delavnog May 6 '14 at 8:34
    
@jeckyll2hide man ping, send just 1 packet with deadline 2 seconds and redirect all output to /dev/null, retrieve just the return value. – Manuel Gutierrez May 6 '14 at 13:30
    
@ManuelGutierrez: sure, thx! – delavnog May 6 '14 at 14:07
1  
-w and -W take values in seconds not milliseconds. Check man ping to make sure. – Alan Turing Jun 15 '15 at 17:29
import subprocess
ping_response = subprocess.Popen(["/bin/ping", "-c1", "-w100", "192.168.0.1"], stdout=subprocess.PIPE).stdout.read()
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2  
The only problem with this is that it wouldn't work on Windows. – Kudu Jun 1 '10 at 21:48
4  
It should be mentioned that the reason something like this is necessary is that ICMP requires root, and /bin/ping gets around this by being set SUID. – Catskul Feb 24 '13 at 22:41
    
Note: May fail if ping is in a different location. Use whereis ping to get the correct path. – octern May 20 '13 at 20:14
1  
This works on Windows: ping_response = subprocess.Popen(["ping", hostname, "-n", '1'], stdout=subprocess.PIPE).stdout.read() – Victor Lellis Mar 5 '15 at 12:23
    
How can I parse the result to check if the response was ok or ko in Windows? – Pitto Sep 15 '15 at 9:09

This function works in any OS

def ping(host):
    """
    Returns True if host responds to a ping request
    """
    import os, platform

    # Ping parameters as function of OS
    ping_str = "-n 1" if  platform.system().lower()=="windows" else "-c 1"

    # Ping
    return os.system("ping " + ping_str + " " + host) == 0
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Tested on Windows, with Python 2.7. Thanks. Btw, may I use this code at work? – Mawg Mar 22 at 11:21
    
This is my favourite solution. +1 – James McCormac May 26 at 0:45

A pure Python ping service as a class, Linux or Windows, which uses threads:

https://github.com/duanev/ping-python

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1  
To run this on windows you need admin rights. – Lorenzo Persichetti May 3 '14 at 17:52
1  
Yes, as on Linux too, port 22 is privileged. On Linux, capabilities can be used to provide admin rights (see the comments in the source for an example). – duanev Nov 28 '15 at 19:23
#!/usr/bin/python3

import subprocess as sp

def ipcheck():
    status,result = sp.getstatusoutput("ping -c1 -w2 " + str(pop))
    if status == 0:
        print("System " + str(pop) + " is UP !")
    else:
        print("System " + str(pop) + " is DOWN !")


pop = input("Enter the ip address: ")
ipcheck()
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This code may have the answer to the question, but it would be helpful to add some comments or explanation of how your code is solving the problem. – skrrgwasme Oct 1 '14 at 16:50

There is a module called pyping that can do this. It can be installed with pip

pip install pyping

It is pretty simple to use, however, when using this module, you need root access due to the fact that it is crafting raw packets under the hood.

import pyping

r = pyping.ping('google.com')

if r.ret_code == 0:
    print("Viagra")
else:
    print("Promescent")
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I'd love to see your code at work XD – Lester Cheung Jun 2 at 23:33
#!/usr/bin/python3

import subprocess as sp

ip = "192.168.122.60"
status,result = sp.getstatusoutput("ping -c1 -w2 " + ip)

if status == 0: 
    print("System " + ip + " is UP !")
else:
    print("System " + ip + " is DOWN !")
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Make Sure pyping is installed or install it pip install pyping

#!/usr/bin/python
import pyping

response = pyping.ping('Your IP')

if response.ret_code == 0:
    print("reachable")
else:
    print("unreachable")
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I ended up finding this question regarding a similar scenario. I tried out pyping but the example given by Naveen didn't work for me in Windows under Python 2.7.

An example that worked for me is:

import pyping

response = pyping.send('Your IP')

if response['ret_code'] == 0:
    print("reachable")
else:
    print("unreachable")
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pyping does not appear to be a standard module. Perhaps you could provide a link? – Mawg Mar 22 at 11:17
    
You can find it here. – naktinis Apr 25 at 10:30

Because I like to have my Python program universal on version 2.7 and 3.x and on platform Linux, Mac OS and Windows, I had to modify the existing examples.

# shebang does not work over all platforms
# ping.py  2016-02-25 Rudolf
# subprocess.call() is preferred to os.system()
# works under Python 2.7 and 3.4
# works under Linux, Mac OS, Windows

def ping(host):
    """
    Returns True if host responds to a ping request
    """
    import subprocess, platform

    # Ping parameters as function of OS
    ping_str = "-n 1" if  platform.system().lower()=="windows" else "-c 1"
    args = "ping " + " " + ping_str + " " + host
    need_sh = False if  platform.system().lower()=="windows" else True

    # Ping
    return subprocess.call(args, shell=need_sh) == 0

# test call
print(ping("192.168.17.142"))
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Tested on Windows, with Python 2.7. Thanks. Btw, may I use this code at work? – Mawg Mar 22 at 11:15
1  
Yes, it is my pleasure, Rudolf. – Rudolf Mar 23 at 18:45
    
Instead of False if platform.system().lower()=="windows" else True you could of course also just use platform.system().lower() != "windows". – Frerich Raabe May 13 at 8:58

Seems simple enough, but gave me fits. I kept getting "icmp open socket operation not permitted" or else the solutions would hang up if the server was off line. If, however, what you want to know is that the server is alive and you are running a web server on that server, then curl will do the job. If you have ssh and certificates, then ssh and a simple command will suffice. Here is the code:

from easyprocess import EasyProcess # as root: pip install EasyProcess
def ping(ip):
    ping="ssh %s date;exit"%(ip) # test ssh alive or
    ping="curl -IL %s"%(ip)      # test if http alive
    response=len(EasyProcess(ping).call(timeout=2).stdout)
    return response #integer 0 if no response in 2 seconds
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Use this it's tested on python 2.7 and works fine it returns ping time in milliseconds if success and return False on fail.

import platform,subproccess,re
def Ping(hostname,timeout):
    if platform.system() == "Windows":
        command="ping "+hostname+" -n 1 -w "+str(timeout*1000)
    else:
        command="ping -i "+str(timeout)+" -c 1 " + hostname
    proccess = subprocess.Popen(command, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
    matches=re.match('.*time=([0-9]+)ms.*', proccess.stdout.read(),re.DOTALL)
    if matches:
        return matches.group(1)
    else: 
        return False
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This script works on Windows, and should work on other OSes : It works on Windows, Debian, and macosx, need a test on solaris.

import os
import platform


def isUp(hostname):

    giveFeedback = False

    if platform.system() == "Windows":
        response = os.system("ping "+hostname+" -n 1")
    else:
        response = os.system("ping -c 1 " + hostname)

    isUpBool = False
    if response == 0:
        if giveFeedback:
            print hostname, 'is up!'
        isUpBool = True
    else:
        if giveFeedback:
            print hostname, 'is down!'

    return isUpBool

print(isUp("example.com")) #Example domain
print(isUp("localhost")) #Your computer
print(isUp("invalid.example.com")) #Unresolvable hostname: https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6761
print(isUp("192.168.1.1")) #Pings local router
print(isUp("192.168.1.135")) #Pings a local computer - will differ for your network
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I had similar requirement so i implemented it as shown below. It is tested on Windows 64 bit and Linux.

import subprocess
def systemCommand(Command):
    Output = ""
    Error = ""     
    try:
        Output = subprocess.check_output(Command,stderr = subprocess.STDOUT,shell='True')
    except subprocess.CalledProcessError as e:
        #Invalid command raises this exception
        Error =  e.output 

    if Output:
        Stdout = Output.split("\n")
    else:
        Stdout = []
    if Error:
        Stderr = Error.split("\n")
    else:
        Stderr = []

    return (Stdout,Stderr)

#in main
Host = "ip to ping"
NoOfPackets = 2
Timeout = 5000 #in milliseconds
#Command for windows
Command = 'ping -n {0} -w {1} {2}'.format(NoOfPackets,Timeout,Host)
#Command for linux 
#Command = 'ping -c {0} -w {1} {2}'.format(NoOfPackets,Timeout,Host)
Stdout,Stderr = systemCommand(Command)
if Stdout:
   print("Host [{}] is reachable.".format(Host))
else:
   print("Host [{}] is unreachable.".format(Host))

When IP is not reachable subprocess.check_output() raises an exception. Extra verification can be done by extracting information from output line 'Packets: Sent = 2, Received = 2, Lost = 0 (0% loss)'.

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I would revise your styling/formatting for more readability. – Metalstorm Feb 4 at 20:57
  1 #!/usr/bin/python
  2
  3 import os
  4 import sys
  5 import time
  6
  7 os.system("clear")
  8 home_network = "172.16.23."
  9 mine = []
 10
 11 for i in range(1, 256):
 12         z =  home_network + str(i)
 13         result = os.system("ping -c 1 "+ str(z))
 14         os.system("clear")
 15         if result == 0:
 16                 mine.append(z)
 17
 18 for j in mine:
 19         print "host ", j ," is up"

A simple one i just cooked up in a minute..using icmplib needs root privs the below works pretty good! HTH

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