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How do I make defensive copies of a Mutable Object which contains a mutable field in an Immutable Object?

class ImmutableObject {

  private final MutableObject immutable_field;

  ImmutableObject(MutableObject y) {
    this.immutable_field = y;
  }
}

class MutableObject {

  public int mutable_field;
}
  • The MutableObject does not have a constructor that lets me set the field.
  • The MutableObject's current state should be captured in the Immutable Object and never changed.
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1  
Sorry for my ignorance, but what is a "defensive copy" of an object? What are the use cases? –  Xavier Ho Jun 2 '10 at 3:28
2  
It's not really immutable if it contains a mutable object is it?... You won't have the security and concurrency goodies that come with immutable objects. –  Artefacto Jun 2 '10 at 3:29
2  
@kunjaan: An object that encapsulates a mutable object is not, by any stretch of imagination, "immutable". Your comment to Artefacto is completely bogus: it's not because a technique called "defensive copy" exists that using it shall automagically make your objects "immutable". Naming your main class ImmutableObject is silly: if it contains a mutable object, defensive copy or no, your class is not immutable. –  NoozNooz42 Jun 2 '10 at 4:48
1  
@kunjaan: my definition of immutable is the same as Artefacto and the same as anyone else. You're probably the only person to think that because your fields cannot be changed it's still an immutable object even though it contains a mutable object. Your definition is both wrong and plain rubbish. –  NoozNooz42 Jun 2 '10 at 4:50
1  
No need to get hostile. I was trying to encapsulate a mutable object into an immutable object. I stripped down everything to the bare minimum and changed the names of the classes to signal which of them need to be immutable. I am just learning here. Please change your pad. –  unj2 Jun 2 '10 at 5:14
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What you need to do is in

  MutableObject return_immutable_field() {
    return immutable_field;
  }

Change to:

  MutableObject return_immutable_field() {
    MutableObject tmp = new MutableObject();
    tmp.mutable_field = immutable_field.mutable_field;
    return tmp;
  }

For an explanation see http://www.javapractices.com/topic/TopicAction.do?Id=15

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The problem is not while returning but while constructing. –  unj2 Jun 2 '10 at 3:41
1  
@OP: In any case, it's basically the same. –  Thomas Eding Jun 2 '10 at 3:57
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Well, assuming that there is nothing to be done about the declaration of the mutable object class, one could leverage reflection (Class.newIntance() and Class.getFields()) to create a new object and copy field values. You could also implement deep copying in this manner. If the class supports serialization, then another hackish approach would be to serialize the object and then save a deserialized copy. If it is possible to fix the design of the mutable object, though, that would be a better approach.

Edit
For the particular example that you've given, Romain's answer does what you want. If you have a general mutable object that doesn't provide a mechanism for copying it and for which the type may not be known until later, then the reflection approach is how one would implement a copy mechanism.

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Thanks, that covers the other part of the question. +1 –  Romain Hippeau Jun 2 '10 at 4:06
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