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Handling integer overflow is a common task, but what's the best way to handle it in C#? Is there some syntactic sugar to make it simpler than with other languages? Or is this really the best way?

int x = foo();
int test = x * common;
if(test / common != x)
    Console.WriteLine("oh noes!");
else
    Console.WriteLine("safe!");
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3  
best way is to prevent in first place –  Mitch Wheat Jun 2 '10 at 4:14
4  
Sure, but that's a different question from the one presented here. Handling it and preventing it are seperate (related of course) discussions. –  Ben Lakey Jun 2 '10 at 4:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 52 down vote accepted

I haven't needed to use this often, but you can use the checked keyword:

int x = foo();
int test = checked(x * common);

Will result in a runtime exception if overflows. From MSDN:

"In a checked context, if an expression produces a value that is outside the range of the destination type, the result depends on whether the expression is constant or non-constant. Constant expressions cause compile time errors, while non-constant expressions are evaluated at run time and raise exceptions."

I should also point out that there is another C# keyword, unchecked, which of course does the opposite of checked and ignores overflows. You might wonder when you'd ever use unchecked since it appears to be the default behavior. Well, there is a C# compiler option that defines how expressions outside of checked and unchecked are handled: /checked. You can set it under the advanced build settings of your project.

If you have a lot of expressions that need to be checked, the simplest thing to do would actually be to set the /checked build option. Then any expression that overflows, unless wrapped in unchecked, would result in a runtime exception.

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1  
That's outstanding. –  Ben Lakey Jun 2 '10 at 19:29
3  
Why is the default behavior is unchecked? Is there any performance concerns on using checked? –  KFL Nov 5 '13 at 1:44
1  
@KFL "Because checking for overflow takes time, the use of unchecked code in situations where there is no danger of overflow might improve performance. However, if overflow is a possibility, a checked environment should be used." See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/a569z7k8.aspx. I also believe that the default is unchecked because it parallels the C / C++ behavior. –  Michael Petito Nov 5 '13 at 1:55
    
There are cases where overflow is useful, for instance the TCP sequence number. An unsigned int just wraps around to zero, so all that's needed is the increment operator. –  slater Sep 25 at 18:03

Try the following

int x = foo();
try {
  int test = checked (x * common);
  Console.WriteLine("safe!");
} catch (OverflowException) {
  Console.WriteLine("oh noes!");
}
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The best way is as Micheal Said - use Checked keyword. This can be done as :

int x = Max value for integer;
try   
{
    checked
    {
        int test = x * 2;
        Console.WriteLine("No Overflaw!");
    }
}
catch (OverflowException exc)
{
   Console.WriteLine("Overflow Exception  caught as: " + exc.ToString());
}
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You need to format your code (insert 4 spaces prior to it and the site will automatically pick up the formatting and syntax highlighting. –  Ben Lakey Jun 2 '10 at 19:30

Sometimes, the simplest way is the best way. I can't think a better way to write what you wrote, but you can short it to:

int x = foo();

if ((x * common) / common != x)
    Console.WriteLine("oh noes!");
else
    Console.WriteLine("safe!");

Note that I didn't remove the x variable because it'd be foolish to call the foo() three times.

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Now I wonder if the compiler would ever optimize that expression away entirely? –  Michael Petito Jun 2 '10 at 4:49
1  
USefull, unless of course you are planning on using the result (x*common), in that case your shortening would require the calculation to be done twice ... –  Cobusve Jun 2 '10 at 8:56
1  
Dangerous if there's any chance that common could be 0... –  Darrel Hoffman Jul 7 '13 at 23:14

Old thread, but I just ran into this. I didn't want to use exceptions. What I ended up with was:

long a = (long)b * (long)c;
if(a>int.MaxValue || a<int.MinValue)
    do whatever you want with the overflow
return((int)a);
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