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I'm looking for the fastest way to determine if a long value is a perfect square (i.e. its square root is another integer). I've done it the easy way, by using the built-in Math.sqrt() function, but I'm wondering if there is a way to do it faster by restricting yourself to integer-only domain. Maintaining a lookup table is impratical (since there are about 231.5 integers whose square is less than 263).

Here is the very simple and straightforward way I'm doing it now:

public final static boolean isPerfectSquare(long n)
{
  if (n < 0)
    return false;

  long tst = (long)(Math.sqrt(n) + 0.5);
  return tst*tst == n;
}

Notes: I'm using this function in many Project Euler problems. So no one else will ever have to maintain this code. And this kind of micro-optimization could actually make a difference, since part of the challenge is to do every algorithm in less than a minute, and this function will need to be called millions of times in some problems.


Update 2: A new solution posted by A. Rex has proven to be even faster. In a run over the first 1 billion integers, the solution only required 34% of the time that the original solution used. While the John Carmack hack is a little better for small values of n, the benefit compared to this solution is pretty small.

Here is the A. Rex solution, converted to Java:

private final static boolean isPerfectSquare(long n)
{
  // Quickfail
  if( n < 0 || ((n&2) != 0) || ((n & 7) == 5) || ((n & 11) == 8) )
    return false;
  if( n == 0 )
    return true;

  // Check mod 255 = 3 * 5 * 17, for fun
  long y = n;
  y = (y & 0xffffffffL) + (y >> 32);
  y = (y & 0xffffL) + (y >> 16);
  y = (y & 0xffL) + ((y >> 8) & 0xffL) + (y >> 16);
  if( bad255[(int)y] )
      return false;

  // Divide out powers of 4 using binary search
  if((n & 0xffffffffL) == 0)
      n >>= 32;
  if((n & 0xffffL) == 0)
      n >>= 16;
  if((n & 0xffL) == 0)
      n >>= 8;
  if((n & 0xfL) == 0)
      n >>= 4;
  if((n & 0x3L) == 0)
      n >>= 2;

  if((n & 0x7L) != 1)
      return false;

  // Compute sqrt using something like Hensel's lemma
  long r, t, z;
  r = start[(int)((n >> 3) & 0x3ffL)];
  do {
    z = n - r * r;
    if( z == 0 )
      return true;
    if( z < 0 )
      return false;
    t = z & (-z);
    r += (z & t) >> 1;
    if( r > (t  >> 1) )
    r = t - r;
  } while( t <= (1L << 33) );
  return false;
}

private static boolean[] bad255 =
{
   false,false,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,
   true ,true ,false,false,true ,true ,false,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,false,
   true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,false,true ,true ,
   true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,false,
   true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,false,
   true ,false,true ,true ,false,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,
   true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,false,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,
   true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,
   true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,
   true ,true ,true ,false,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,
   true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,
   true ,false,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,false,true ,
   true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,
   false,true ,false,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,
   true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,
   false,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,false,true ,true ,
   true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,false,
   true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,
   false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,
   true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,false,true ,true ,false,
   true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,false,true ,
   true ,false,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,
   true ,true ,true ,false,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,
   true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,
   true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,false,true ,true ,false,
   false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,
   true ,false,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,
   true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,
   true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,false,
   true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,
   false,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,false,true ,true ,
   true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,
   true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,false,true ,false,true ,true ,
   false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,
   true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,false,true ,true ,true ,
   true ,true ,true ,true ,false,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,
   true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,
   true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,
   true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,false,true ,true ,true ,true ,true ,
   true ,true ,true ,false,false
};

private static int[] start =
{
  1,3,1769,5,1937,1741,7,1451,479,157,9,91,945,659,1817,11,
  1983,707,1321,1211,1071,13,1479,405,415,1501,1609,741,15,339,1703,203,
  129,1411,873,1669,17,1715,1145,1835,351,1251,887,1573,975,19,1127,395,
  1855,1981,425,453,1105,653,327,21,287,93,713,1691,1935,301,551,587,
  257,1277,23,763,1903,1075,1799,1877,223,1437,1783,859,1201,621,25,779,
  1727,573,471,1979,815,1293,825,363,159,1315,183,27,241,941,601,971,
  385,131,919,901,273,435,647,1493,95,29,1417,805,719,1261,1177,1163,
  1599,835,1367,315,1361,1933,1977,747,31,1373,1079,1637,1679,1581,1753,1355,
  513,1539,1815,1531,1647,205,505,1109,33,1379,521,1627,1457,1901,1767,1547,
  1471,1853,1833,1349,559,1523,967,1131,97,35,1975,795,497,1875,1191,1739,
  641,1149,1385,133,529,845,1657,725,161,1309,375,37,463,1555,615,1931,
  1343,445,937,1083,1617,883,185,1515,225,1443,1225,869,1423,1235,39,1973,
  769,259,489,1797,1391,1485,1287,341,289,99,1271,1701,1713,915,537,1781,
  1215,963,41,581,303,243,1337,1899,353,1245,329,1563,753,595,1113,1589,
  897,1667,407,635,785,1971,135,43,417,1507,1929,731,207,275,1689,1397,
  1087,1725,855,1851,1873,397,1607,1813,481,163,567,101,1167,45,1831,1205,
  1025,1021,1303,1029,1135,1331,1017,427,545,1181,1033,933,1969,365,1255,1013,
  959,317,1751,187,47,1037,455,1429,609,1571,1463,1765,1009,685,679,821,
  1153,387,1897,1403,1041,691,1927,811,673,227,137,1499,49,1005,103,629,
  831,1091,1449,1477,1967,1677,697,1045,737,1117,1737,667,911,1325,473,437,
  1281,1795,1001,261,879,51,775,1195,801,1635,759,165,1871,1645,1049,245,
  703,1597,553,955,209,1779,1849,661,865,291,841,997,1265,1965,1625,53,
  1409,893,105,1925,1297,589,377,1579,929,1053,1655,1829,305,1811,1895,139,
  575,189,343,709,1711,1139,1095,277,993,1699,55,1435,655,1491,1319,331,
  1537,515,791,507,623,1229,1529,1963,1057,355,1545,603,1615,1171,743,523,
  447,1219,1239,1723,465,499,57,107,1121,989,951,229,1521,851,167,715,
  1665,1923,1687,1157,1553,1869,1415,1749,1185,1763,649,1061,561,531,409,907,
  319,1469,1961,59,1455,141,1209,491,1249,419,1847,1893,399,211,985,1099,
  1793,765,1513,1275,367,1587,263,1365,1313,925,247,1371,1359,109,1561,1291,
  191,61,1065,1605,721,781,1735,875,1377,1827,1353,539,1777,429,1959,1483,
  1921,643,617,389,1809,947,889,981,1441,483,1143,293,817,749,1383,1675,
  63,1347,169,827,1199,1421,583,1259,1505,861,457,1125,143,1069,807,1867,
  2047,2045,279,2043,111,307,2041,597,1569,1891,2039,1957,1103,1389,231,2037,
  65,1341,727,837,977,2035,569,1643,1633,547,439,1307,2033,1709,345,1845,
  1919,637,1175,379,2031,333,903,213,1697,797,1161,475,1073,2029,921,1653,
  193,67,1623,1595,943,1395,1721,2027,1761,1955,1335,357,113,1747,1497,1461,
  1791,771,2025,1285,145,973,249,171,1825,611,265,1189,847,1427,2023,1269,
  321,1475,1577,69,1233,755,1223,1685,1889,733,1865,2021,1807,1107,1447,1077,
  1663,1917,1129,1147,1775,1613,1401,555,1953,2019,631,1243,1329,787,871,885,
  449,1213,681,1733,687,115,71,1301,2017,675,969,411,369,467,295,693,
  1535,509,233,517,401,1843,1543,939,2015,669,1527,421,591,147,281,501,
  577,195,215,699,1489,525,1081,917,1951,2013,73,1253,1551,173,857,309,
  1407,899,663,1915,1519,1203,391,1323,1887,739,1673,2011,1585,493,1433,117,
  705,1603,1111,965,431,1165,1863,533,1823,605,823,1179,625,813,2009,75,
  1279,1789,1559,251,657,563,761,1707,1759,1949,777,347,335,1133,1511,267,
  833,1085,2007,1467,1745,1805,711,149,1695,803,1719,485,1295,1453,935,459,
  1151,381,1641,1413,1263,77,1913,2005,1631,541,119,1317,1841,1773,359,651,
  961,323,1193,197,175,1651,441,235,1567,1885,1481,1947,881,2003,217,843,
  1023,1027,745,1019,913,717,1031,1621,1503,867,1015,1115,79,1683,793,1035,
  1089,1731,297,1861,2001,1011,1593,619,1439,477,585,283,1039,1363,1369,1227,
  895,1661,151,645,1007,1357,121,1237,1375,1821,1911,549,1999,1043,1945,1419,
  1217,957,599,571,81,371,1351,1003,1311,931,311,1381,1137,723,1575,1611,
  767,253,1047,1787,1169,1997,1273,853,1247,413,1289,1883,177,403,999,1803,
  1345,451,1495,1093,1839,269,199,1387,1183,1757,1207,1051,783,83,423,1995,
  639,1155,1943,123,751,1459,1671,469,1119,995,393,219,1743,237,153,1909,
  1473,1859,1705,1339,337,909,953,1771,1055,349,1993,613,1393,557,729,1717,
  511,1533,1257,1541,1425,819,519,85,991,1693,503,1445,433,877,1305,1525,
  1601,829,809,325,1583,1549,1991,1941,927,1059,1097,1819,527,1197,1881,1333,
  383,125,361,891,495,179,633,299,863,285,1399,987,1487,1517,1639,1141,
  1729,579,87,1989,593,1907,839,1557,799,1629,201,155,1649,1837,1063,949,
  255,1283,535,773,1681,461,1785,683,735,1123,1801,677,689,1939,487,757,
  1857,1987,983,443,1327,1267,313,1173,671,221,695,1509,271,1619,89,565,
  127,1405,1431,1659,239,1101,1159,1067,607,1565,905,1755,1231,1299,665,373,
  1985,701,1879,1221,849,627,1465,789,543,1187,1591,923,1905,979,1241,181
};

Update: I've tried the different solutions presented below.

  • After exhaustive testing, I found that adding 0.5 to the result of Math.sqrt() is not necessary, at least not on my machine.
  • The John Carmack hack was faster, but it gave incorrect results starting at n=410881. However, as suggested by BobbyShaftoe, we can use the Carmack hack for n < 410881.
  • Newton's method was a good bit slower than Math.sqrt(). This is probably because Math.sqrt() uses something similar to Newton's Method, but implemented in the hardware so it's much faster than in Java. Also, Newton's Method still required use of doubles.
  • A modified Newton's method, which used a few tricks so that only integer math was involved, required some hacks to avoid overflow (I want this function to work with all positive 64-bit signed integers), and it was still slower than Math.sqrt().
  • Binary chop was even slower. This makes sense because the binary chop will on average require 16 passes to find the square root of a 64-bit number.

The one suggestion which did show improvements was made by John D. Cook. You can observe that the last hex digit (i.e. the last 4 bits) of a perfect square must be 0, 1, 4, or 9. This means that 75% of numbers can be immediately eliminated as possible squares. Implementing this solution resulted in about a 50% reduction in runtime.

Working from John's suggestion, I investigated properties of the last n bits of a perfect square. By analyzing the last 6 bits, I found that only 12 out of 64 values are possible for the last 6 bits. This means 81% of values can be eliminated without using any math. Implementing this solution gave an additional 8% reduction in runtime (compared to my original algorithm). Analyzing more than 6 bits results in a list of possible ending bits which is too large to be practical.

Here is the code that I have used, which runs in 42% of the time required by the original algorithm (based on a run over the first 100 million integers). For values of n less than 410881, it runs in only 29% of the time required by the original algorithm.

private final static boolean isPerfectSquare(long n)
{
  if (n < 0)
    return false;

  switch((int)(n & 0x3F))
  {
  case 0x00: case 0x01: case 0x04: case 0x09: case 0x10: case 0x11:
  case 0x19: case 0x21: case 0x24: case 0x29: case 0x31: case 0x39:
    long sqrt;
    if(n < 410881L)
    {
      //John Carmack hack, converted to Java.
      // See: http://www.codemaestro.com/reviews/9
      int i;
      float x2, y;

      x2 = n * 0.5F;
      y  = n;
      i  = Float.floatToRawIntBits(y);
      i  = 0x5f3759df - ( i >> 1 );
      y  = Float.intBitsToFloat(i);
      y  = y * ( 1.5F - ( x2 * y * y ) );

      sqrt = (long)(1.0F/y);
    }
    else
    {
      //Carmack hack gives incorrect answer for n >= 410881.
      sqrt = (long)Math.sqrt(n);
    }
    return sqrt*sqrt == n;

  default:
    return false;
  }
}

Notes:

  • According to John's tests, using or statements is faster in C++ than using a switch, but in Java and C# there appears to be no difference between or and switch.
  • I also tried making a lookup table (as a private static array of 64 boolean values). Then instead of either switch or or statement, I would just say if(lookup[(int)(n&0x3F)]) { test } else return false;. To my surprise, this was (just slightly) slower. I'm not sure why. This is because array bounds are checked in Java.
share|improve this question
5  
This is Java code, where int==32 bits and long==64 bits, and both are signed. –  Kip Nov 17 '08 at 14:35
4  
@Shreevasta: I've done some testing on large values (greater than 2^53), and your method gives some false positives. The first one encountered is for n=9007199326062755, which is not a perfect square but is returned as one. –  Kip Dec 2 '08 at 20:03
9  
Please don't call it the "John Carmack hack." He didn't come up with it. –  user9282 Mar 11 '09 at 6:27
9  
@mamama -- Perhaps, but it's attributed to him. Henry Ford didn't invent the car, the Wright Bros. didn't invent the airplane, and and Galleleo wasn't the first to figure out the Earth revolved around the sun... the world is made up of stolen inventions (and love). –  OverMachoGrande May 6 '10 at 10:25
1  
You might get a tiny speed increase in the 'quickfail' by using something like ((1<<(n&15))|65004) != 0, instead of having three separate checks. –  Nabb Nov 1 '11 at 12:06

32 Answers 32

up vote 313 down vote accepted

I figured out a method that works ~35% faster than your 6bits+Carmack+sqrt code, at least with my CPU (x86) and programming language (C/C++). Your results may vary, especially because I don't know how the Java factor will play out.

My approach is threefold:

  1. First, filter out obvious answers. This includes negative numbers and looking at the last 4 bits. (I found looking at the last six didn't help.) I also answer yes for 0. (In reading the code below, note that my input is int64 x.)
    if( x < 0 || (x&2) || ((x & 7) == 5) || ((x & 11) == 8) )
        return false;
    if( x == 0 )
        return true;
  2. Next, check if it's a square modulo 255 = 3 * 5 * 17. Because that's a product of three distinct primes, only about 1/8 of the residues mod 255 are squares. However, in my experience, calling the modulo operator (%) costs more than the benefit one gets, so I use bit tricks involving 255 = 2^8-1 to compute the residue. (For better or worse, I am not using the trick of reading individual bytes out of a word, only bitwise-and and shifts.)
    int64 y = x;
    y = (y & 4294967295LL) + (y >> 32); 
    y = (y & 65535) + (y >> 16);
    y = (y & 255) + ((y >> 8) & 255) + (y >> 16);
    // At this point, y is between 0 and 511.  More code can reduce it farther.
    
    To actually check if the residue is a square, I look up the answer in a precomputed table.
    if( bad255[y] )
        return false;
    // However, I just use a table of size 512
    
  3. Finally, try to compute the square root using a method similar to Hensel's lemma. (I don't think it's applicable directly, but it works with some modifications.) Before doing that, I divide out all powers of 2 with a binary search:
    if((x & 4294967295LL) == 0)
        x >>= 32;
    if((x & 65535) == 0)
        x >>= 16;
    if((x & 255) == 0)
        x >>= 8;
    if((x & 15) == 0)
        x >>= 4;
    if((x & 3) == 0)
        x >>= 2;
    At this point, for our number to be a square, it must be 1 mod 8.
    if((x & 7) != 1)
        return false;
    The basic structure of Hensel's lemma is the following. (Note: untested code; if it doesn't work, try t=2 or 8.)
    int64 t = 4, r = 1;
    t <<= 1; r += ((x - r * r) & t) >> 1;
    t <<= 1; r += ((x - r * r) & t) >> 1;
    t <<= 1; r += ((x - r * r) & t) >> 1;
    // Repeat until t is 2^33 or so.  Use a loop if you want.
    The idea is that at each iteration, you add one bit onto r, the "current" square root of x; each square root is accurate modulo a larger and larger power of 2, namely t/2. At the end, r and t/2-r will be square roots of x modulo t/2. (Note that if r is a square root of x, then so is -r. This is true even modulo numbers, but beware, modulo some numbers, things can have even more than 2 square roots; notably, this includes powers of 2.) Because our actual square root is less than 2^32, at that point we can actually just check if r or t/2-r are real square roots. In my actual code, I use the following modified loop:
    int64 r, t, z;
    r = start[(x >> 3) & 1023];
    do {
        z = x - r * r;
        if( z == 0 )
            return true;
        if( z < 0 )
            return false;
        t = z & (-z);
        r += (z & t) >> 1;
        if( r > (t >> 1) )
            r = t - r;
    } while( t <= (1LL << 33) );
    The speedup here is obtained in three ways: precomputed start value (equivalent to ~10 iterations of the loop), earlier exit of the loop, and skipping some t values. For the last part, I look at z = r - x * x, and set t to be the largest power of 2 dividing z with a bit trick. This allows me to skip t values that wouldn't have affected the value of r anyway. The precomputed start value in my case picks out the "smallest positive" square root modulo 8192.

Even if this code doesn't work faster for you, I hope you enjoy some of the ideas it contains. Complete, tested code follows, including the precomputed tables.

typedef signed long long int int64;

int start[1024] =
{1,3,1769,5,1937,1741,7,1451,479,157,9,91,945,659,1817,11,
1983,707,1321,1211,1071,13,1479,405,415,1501,1609,741,15,339,1703,203,
129,1411,873,1669,17,1715,1145,1835,351,1251,887,1573,975,19,1127,395,
1855,1981,425,453,1105,653,327,21,287,93,713,1691,1935,301,551,587,
257,1277,23,763,1903,1075,1799,1877,223,1437,1783,859,1201,621,25,779,
1727,573,471,1979,815,1293,825,363,159,1315,183,27,241,941,601,971,
385,131,919,901,273,435,647,1493,95,29,1417,805,719,1261,1177,1163,
1599,835,1367,315,1361,1933,1977,747,31,1373,1079,1637,1679,1581,1753,1355,
513,1539,1815,1531,1647,205,505,1109,33,1379,521,1627,1457,1901,1767,1547,
1471,1853,1833,1349,559,1523,967,1131,97,35,1975,795,497,1875,1191,1739,
641,1149,1385,133,529,845,1657,725,161,1309,375,37,463,1555,615,1931,
1343,445,937,1083,1617,883,185,1515,225,1443,1225,869,1423,1235,39,1973,
769,259,489,1797,1391,1485,1287,341,289,99,1271,1701,1713,915,537,1781,
1215,963,41,581,303,243,1337,1899,353,1245,329,1563,753,595,1113,1589,
897,1667,407,635,785,1971,135,43,417,1507,1929,731,207,275,1689,1397,
1087,1725,855,1851,1873,397,1607,1813,481,163,567,101,1167,45,1831,1205,
1025,1021,1303,1029,1135,1331,1017,427,545,1181,1033,933,1969,365,1255,1013,
959,317,1751,187,47,1037,455,1429,609,1571,1463,1765,1009,685,679,821,
1153,387,1897,1403,1041,691,1927,811,673,227,137,1499,49,1005,103,629,
831,1091,1449,1477,1967,1677,697,1045,737,1117,1737,667,911,1325,473,437,
1281,1795,1001,261,879,51,775,1195,801,1635,759,165,1871,1645,1049,245,
703,1597,553,955,209,1779,1849,661,865,291,841,997,1265,1965,1625,53,
1409,893,105,1925,1297,589,377,1579,929,1053,1655,1829,305,1811,1895,139,
575,189,343,709,1711,1139,1095,277,993,1699,55,1435,655,1491,1319,331,
1537,515,791,507,623,1229,1529,1963,1057,355,1545,603,1615,1171,743,523,
447,1219,1239,1723,465,499,57,107,1121,989,951,229,1521,851,167,715,
1665,1923,1687,1157,1553,1869,1415,1749,1185,1763,649,1061,561,531,409,907,
319,1469,1961,59,1455,141,1209,491,1249,419,1847,1893,399,211,985,1099,
1793,765,1513,1275,367,1587,263,1365,1313,925,247,1371,1359,109,1561,1291,
191,61,1065,1605,721,781,1735,875,1377,1827,1353,539,1777,429,1959,1483,
1921,643,617,389,1809,947,889,981,1441,483,1143,293,817,749,1383,1675,
63,1347,169,827,1199,1421,583,1259,1505,861,457,1125,143,1069,807,1867,
2047,2045,279,2043,111,307,2041,597,1569,1891,2039,1957,1103,1389,231,2037,
65,1341,727,837,977,2035,569,1643,1633,547,439,1307,2033,1709,345,1845,
1919,637,1175,379,2031,333,903,213,1697,797,1161,475,1073,2029,921,1653,
193,67,1623,1595,943,1395,1721,2027,1761,1955,1335,357,113,1747,1497,1461,
1791,771,2025,1285,145,973,249,171,1825,611,265,1189,847,1427,2023,1269,
321,1475,1577,69,1233,755,1223,1685,1889,733,1865,2021,1807,1107,1447,1077,
1663,1917,1129,1147,1775,1613,1401,555,1953,2019,631,1243,1329,787,871,885,
449,1213,681,1733,687,115,71,1301,2017,675,969,411,369,467,295,693,
1535,509,233,517,401,1843,1543,939,2015,669,1527,421,591,147,281,501,
577,195,215,699,1489,525,1081,917,1951,2013,73,1253,1551,173,857,309,
1407,899,663,1915,1519,1203,391,1323,1887,739,1673,2011,1585,493,1433,117,
705,1603,1111,965,431,1165,1863,533,1823,605,823,1179,625,813,2009,75,
1279,1789,1559,251,657,563,761,1707,1759,1949,777,347,335,1133,1511,267,
833,1085,2007,1467,1745,1805,711,149,1695,803,1719,485,1295,1453,935,459,
1151,381,1641,1413,1263,77,1913,2005,1631,541,119,1317,1841,1773,359,651,
961,323,1193,197,175,1651,441,235,1567,1885,1481,1947,881,2003,217,843,
1023,1027,745,1019,913,717,1031,1621,1503,867,1015,1115,79,1683,793,1035,
1089,1731,297,1861,2001,1011,1593,619,1439,477,585,283,1039,1363,1369,1227,
895,1661,151,645,1007,1357,121,1237,1375,1821,1911,549,1999,1043,1945,1419,
1217,957,599,571,81,371,1351,1003,1311,931,311,1381,1137,723,1575,1611,
767,253,1047,1787,1169,1997,1273,853,1247,413,1289,1883,177,403,999,1803,
1345,451,1495,1093,1839,269,199,1387,1183,1757,1207,1051,783,83,423,1995,
639,1155,1943,123,751,1459,1671,469,1119,995,393,219,1743,237,153,1909,
1473,1859,1705,1339,337,909,953,1771,1055,349,1993,613,1393,557,729,1717,
511,1533,1257,1541,1425,819,519,85,991,1693,503,1445,433,877,1305,1525,
1601,829,809,325,1583,1549,1991,1941,927,1059,1097,1819,527,1197,1881,1333,
383,125,361,891,495,179,633,299,863,285,1399,987,1487,1517,1639,1141,
1729,579,87,1989,593,1907,839,1557,799,1629,201,155,1649,1837,1063,949,
255,1283,535,773,1681,461,1785,683,735,1123,1801,677,689,1939,487,757,
1857,1987,983,443,1327,1267,313,1173,671,221,695,1509,271,1619,89,565,
127,1405,1431,1659,239,1101,1159,1067,607,1565,905,1755,1231,1299,665,373,
1985,701,1879,1221,849,627,1465,789,543,1187,1591,923,1905,979,1241,181};

bool bad255[512] =
{0,0,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,0,1,0,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,
 1,1,0,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,0,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,
 0,1,0,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,
 1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,
 1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,
 1,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,0,1,0,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,0,1,1,
 1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,
 1,0,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,
 0,0,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,0,1,0,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,
 1,1,0,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,0,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,
 0,1,0,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,
 1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,
 1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,
 1,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,0,1,0,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,0,1,1,
 1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,
 1,0,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,
 0,0};

inline bool square( int64 x ) {
    // Quickfail
    if( x < 0 || (x&2) || ((x & 7) == 5) || ((x & 11) == 8) )
        return false;
    if( x == 0 )
        return true;

    // Check mod 255 = 3 * 5 * 17, for fun
    int64 y = x;
    y = (y & 4294967295LL) + (y >> 32);
    y = (y & 65535) + (y >> 16);
    y = (y & 255) + ((y >> 8) & 255) + (y >> 16);
    if( bad255[y] )
        return false;

    // Divide out powers of 4 using binary search
    if((x & 4294967295LL) == 0)
        x >>= 32;
    if((x & 65535) == 0)
        x >>= 16;
    if((x & 255) == 0)
        x >>= 8;
    if((x & 15) == 0)
        x >>= 4;
    if((x & 3) == 0)
        x >>= 2;

    if((x & 7) != 1)
        return false;

    // Compute sqrt using something like Hensel's lemma
    int64 r, t, z;
    r = start[(x >> 3) & 1023];
    do {
        z = x - r * r;
        if( z == 0 )
            return true;
        if( z < 0 )
            return false;
        t = z & (-z);
        r += (z & t) >> 1;
        if( r > (t  >> 1) )
            r = t - r;
    } while( t <= (1LL << 33) );

    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Wow! I'll try to convert this to Java and do a comparison, as well as an accuracy check on the results. I'll let you know what I find. –  Kip Jan 12 '09 at 21:47
33  
Wow, this is beautiful. I'd seen Hensel lifting before (computing roots of polynomials modulo a prime) but I hadn't even realised the lemma could be carefully lowered all the way for computing square roots of numbers; this is... uplifting :) –  ShreevatsaR May 25 '09 at 2:36
14  
OK, answer is 1000 days old, has 132 upvotes, and has comments like "Wow!!", "Awesome!", and "Wow, this is beautiful!" Maybe someone can help me. Tried this code directly, and it failed my test suite. On quick inspection, the "1LL >> 33" at the end looked wonky for a couple reasons (shifting 1 right 33 times? and the fact that it's a right shift of a signed value). Changed the shift direction, everything seems to work. Am I missing something? Not criticizing A. Rex, code seems to fly now, and I couldn't have come up with this in 25 years. Just baffled. –  Dan Aug 18 '11 at 0:17
9  
@Dan: You're right, that shift was in the wrong direction! If you look carefully, it's in the right direction in the "explanation" above the block of code, so my best guess was that it went wrong when I manually translated less-thans and greater-thans into HTML escape sequences. Sorry about that and enjoy the correct code (or let me know if you find any other mistakes)! –  A. Rex Aug 21 '11 at 17:03
3  
Maartinus posted a 2x faster solution (and much shorter) down below, a bit later, that doesn't seem to be getting much love. –  Jason C Mar 17 at 3:46

You'll have to do some benchmarking. The best algorithm will depend on the distribution of your inputs.

Your algorithm may be nearly optimal, but you might want to do a quick check to rule out some possibilities before calling your square root routine. For example, look at the last digit of your number in hex by doing a bit-wise "and." Perfect squares can only end in 0, 1, 4, or 9 in base 16, So for 75% of your inputs (assuming they are uniformly distributed) you can avoid a call to the square root in exchange for some very fast bit twiddling.

Kip benchmarked the following code implementing the hex trick. When testing numbers 1 through 100,000,000, this code ran twice as fast as the original.

public final static boolean isPerfectSquare(long n)
{
    if (n < 0)
        return false;

    switch((int)(n & 0xF))
    {
    case 0: case 1: case 4: case 9:
        long tst = (long)Math.sqrt(n);
        return tst*tst == n;

    default:
        return false;
    }
}

When I tested the analogous code in C++, it actually ran slower than the original. However, when I eliminated the switch statement, the hex trick once again make the code twice as fast.

int isPerfectSquare(int n)
{
    int h = n & 0xF;  // h is the last hex "digit"
    if (h > 9)
        return 0;
    // Use lazy evaluation to jump out of the if statement as soon as possible
    if (h != 2 && h != 3 && h != 5 && h != 6 && h != 7 && h != 8)
    {
        int t = (int) floor( sqrt((double) n) + 0.5 );
        return t*t == n;
    }
    return 0;
}

Eliminating the switch statement had little effect on the C# code.

share|improve this answer
2  
Superb solution. Wondering how you came up with it? Is a fairly established principle or just something you figured out? :D –  gekkostate Dec 7 '11 at 15:30
1  
@LarsH There's no need to add 0.5, see my solution for a link to the proof. –  maaartinus Jun 13 at 18:12

I'm pretty late to the party, but I hope to provide a better answer; shorter and (assuming my benchmark is correct) also much faster.

long goodMask; // 0xC840C04048404040 computed below
{
    for (int i=0; i<64; ++i) goodMask |= Long.MIN_VALUE >>> (i*i);
}

public boolean isSquare(long x) {
    // This tests if the 6 least significant bits are right.
    // Moving the to be tested bit to the highest position saves us masking.
    if (goodMask << x >= 0) return false;
    final int numberOfTrailingZeros = Long.numberOfTrailingZeros(x);
    // Each square ends with an even number of zeros.
    if ((numberOfTrailingZeros & 1) != 0) return false;
    x >>= numberOfTrailingZeros;
    // Now x is either 0 or odd.
    // In binary each odd square ends with 001.
    // Postpone the sign test until now; handle zero in the branch.
    if ((x&7) != 1 | x <= 0) return x == 0;
    // Do it in the classical way.
    // The correctness is not trivial as the conversion from long to double is lossy!
    final long tst = (long) Math.sqrt(x);
    return tst * tst == x;
}

The first test catches most non-squares quickly. It uses a 64-item table packed in a long, so there's no array access cost (indirection and bounds checks). For a uniformly random long, there's a 81.25% probability of ending here.

The second test catches all numbers having an odd number of twos in their factorization. The method Long.numberOfTrailingZeros is very fast as it gets JIT-ed into a single i86 instruction.

The third test handles numbers ending with 011, 101, or 111 in binary, which are no perfect squares. It also cares about negative numbers and also handles 0.

The final test falls back to double arithmetic. As double has only 56 bits mantissa, the conversion from long to double includes rounding for big values. Nonetheless, the test is correct (unless the proof is wrong).

Trying to incorporate the mod255 idea wasn't successful.

share|improve this answer

I'm not sure if it would be faster, or even accurate, but you could use John Carmack's Magical Square Root, algorithm to solve the square root faster. You could probably easily test this for all possible 32 bit integers, and validate that you actually got correct results, as it's only an appoximation. However, now that I think about it, using doubles is approximating also, so I'm not sure how that would come into play.

share|improve this answer
5  
I believe Carmack's trick is fairly pointless these days. The built-in sqrt instruction is a lot faster than it used to be, so you may be better off just performing a regular square root and testing if the result is an int. As always, benchmark it. –  jalf Nov 17 '08 at 15:22
1  
This breaks starting at n=410881, the John Carmack magic formula returns 642.00104, when the actual square root is 641. –  Kip Nov 17 '08 at 19:55
5  
I recently used Carmack's trick in a Java game and it was very effective, giving a speedup of about 40%, so it is still useful, at least in Java. –  finnw Jan 7 '10 at 11:57
2  
@Robert Fraser Yes +40% in the overall frame rate. The game had a particle physics system which took up nearly all available CPU cycles, dominated by the square root function and the round-to-nearest-integer function (which I had also optimised using a similar bit twiddling hack.) –  finnw May 6 '10 at 10:48

I was thinking about the horrible times I've spent in Numerical Analysis course.

And then I remember, there was this function circling around the 'net from the Quake Source code:

float Q_rsqrt( float number )
{
  long i;
  float x2, y;
  const float threehalfs = 1.5F;

  x2 = number * 0.5F;
  y  = number;
  i  = * ( long * ) &y;  // evil floating point bit level hacking
  i  = 0x5f3759df - ( i >> 1 ); // wtf?
  y  = * ( float * ) &i;
  y  = y * ( threehalfs - ( x2 * y * y ) ); // 1st iteration
  // y  = y * ( threehalfs - ( x2 * y * y ) ); // 2nd iteration, this can be removed

  #ifndef Q3_VM
  #ifdef __linux__
    assert( !isnan(y) ); // bk010122 - FPE?
  #endif
  #endif
  return y;
}

Which basically calculates a square root, using Newton's approximation function (cant remember the exact name).

It should be usable and might even be faster, it's from one of the phenomenal id software's game!

It's written in C++ but it should not be too hard to reuse the same technique in Java once you get the idea:

I originally found it at: http://www.codemaestro.com/reviews/9

Newton's method explained at wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newton%27s_method

You can follow the link for more explanation of how it works, but if you don't care much, then this is roughly what I remember from reading the blog and from taking the Numerical Analysis course:

  • the * (long*) &y is basically a fast convert-to-long function so integer operations can be applied on the raw bytes.
  • the 0x5f3759df - (i >> 1); line is a pre-calculated seed value for the approximation function.
  • the * (float*) &i converts the value back to floating point.
  • the y = y * ( threehalfs - ( x2 * y * y ) ) line bascially iterates the value over the function again.

The approximation function gives more precise values the more you iterate the function over the result. In Quake's case, one iteration is "good enough", but if it wasn't for you... then you could add as much iteration as you need.

This should be faster because it reduces the number of division operations done in naive square rooting down to a simple divide by 2 (actually a * 0.5F multiply operation) and replace it with a few fixed number of multiplication operations instead.

share|improve this answer
2  
It should be noted that this returns 1/sqrt(number), not sqrt(number). I've done some testing, and this fails starting at n=410881: the John Carmack magic formula returns 642.00104, when the actual square root is 641. –  Kip Nov 17 '08 at 19:56
2  
You could look at Chris Lomonts paper on fast inverse square roots: lomont.org/Math/Papers/2003/InvSqrt.pdf It uses the same technique as here, but with a different magic number. The paper explains why the magic number was chosen. –  Dan Dec 2 '08 at 10:24
1  
Also, beyond3d.com/content/articles/8 and beyond3d.com/content/articles/15 shed some light as to the origins of this method. It's often attributed to John Carmack, but it seems the original code was (possibly) written by Gary Tarolli, Greg Walsh and probably others. –  Dan Dec 2 '08 at 10:26

If you do a binary chop to try to find the "right" square root, you can fairly easily detect if the value you've got is close enough to tell:

(n+1)^2 = n^2 + 2n + 1
(n-1)^2 = n^2 - 2n + 1

So having calculated n^2, the options are:

  • n^2 = target: done, return true
  • n^2 + 2n + 1 > target > n^2 : you're close, but it's not perfect: return false
  • n^2 - 2n + 1 < target < n^2 : ditto
  • target < n^2 - 2n + 1 : binary chop on a lower n
  • target > n^2 + 2n + 1 : binary chop on a higher n

(Sorry, this uses n as your current guess, and target for the parameter. Apologise for the confusion!)

I don't know whether this will be faster or not, but it's worth a try.

EDIT: The binary chop doesn't have to take in the whole range of integers, either (2^x)^2 = 2^(2x), so once you've found the top set bit in your target (which can be done with a bit-twiddling trick; I forget exactly how) you can quickly get a range of potential answers. Mind you, a naive binary chop is still only going to take up to 31 or 32 iterations.

share|improve this answer
3  
Hardware sqrts are actually pretty fast these days. –  Adam Rosenfield Nov 29 '08 at 3:58

It should be much faster to use Newton's method to calculate the Integer Square Root, then square this number and check, as you do in your current solution. Newton's method is the basis for the Carmack solution mentioned in some other answers. You should be able to get a faster answer since you're only interested in the integer part of the root, allowing you to stop the approximation algorithm sooner.

Another optimization that you can try: If the Digital Root of a number doesn't end in 1, 4, 7, or 9 the number is not a perfect square. This can be used as a quick way to eliminate 60% of your inputs before applying the slower square root algorithm.

share|improve this answer
1  
Are you sure the digital root is equivalent to modulo? It seems to be something entirely different as explained by the link. Notice the list is 1,4,7,9 not 1,4,5,9. –  Fractaly Dec 4 '11 at 4:44

I want this function to work with all positive 64-bit signed integers

Math.sqrt() works with doubles as input parameters, so you won't get accurate results for integers bigger than 2^53.

share|improve this answer
3  
I've actually tested the answer on all perfect squares larger than 2^53, as well as all numbers from 5 below each perfect square to 5 above each perfect square, and I get the correct result. (the roundoff error is corrected when I round the sqrt answer to a long, then square that value and compare) –  Kip Jan 6 '09 at 14:33
1  
@Kip: I guess I've proven that it works. –  maaartinus Sep 8 '13 at 19:12

I ran my own analysis of several of the algorithms in this thread and came up with some new results. You can see those old results in the edit history of this answer, but they're not accurate, as I made a mistake, and wasted time analyzing several algorithms which aren't close. However, pulling lessons from several different answers, I now have two algorithms that crush the "winner" of this thread. Here's the core thing I do differently than everyone else:

// This is faster because a number is divisible by 2^4 or more only 6% of the time
// and more than that a vanishingly small percentage.
while((x & 0x3) == 0) x >>= 2;
// This is effectively the same as the switch-case statement used in the original
// answer. 
if((x & 0x7) != 1) return false;

However, this simple line, which most of the time adds one or two very fast instructions, greatly simplifies the switch-case statement into one if statement. However, it can add to the runtime if many of the tested numbers have significant power-of-two factors.

The algorithms below are as follows:

  • Internet - Kip's posted answer
  • Durron - My modified answer using the one-pass answer as a base
  • DurronTwo - My modified answer using the two-pass answer (by @JohnnyHeggheim), with some other slight modifications.

Here is a sample runtime if the numbers are generated using Math.abs(java.util.Random.nextLong())

 0% Scenario{vm=java, trial=0, benchmark=Internet} 39673.40 ns; ?=378.78 ns @ 3 trials
33% Scenario{vm=java, trial=0, benchmark=Durron} 37785.75 ns; ?=478.86 ns @ 10 trials
67% Scenario{vm=java, trial=0, benchmark=DurronTwo} 35978.10 ns; ?=734.10 ns @ 10 trials

benchmark   us linear runtime
 Internet 39.7 ==============================
   Durron 37.8 ============================
DurronTwo 36.0 ===========================

vm: java
trial: 0

And here is a sample runtime if it's run on the first million longs only:

 0% Scenario{vm=java, trial=0, benchmark=Internet} 2933380.84 ns; ?=56939.84 ns @ 10 trials
33% Scenario{vm=java, trial=0, benchmark=Durron} 2243266.81 ns; ?=50537.62 ns @ 10 trials
67% Scenario{vm=java, trial=0, benchmark=DurronTwo} 3159227.68 ns; ?=10766.22 ns @ 3 trials

benchmark   ms linear runtime
 Internet 2.93 ===========================
   Durron 2.24 =====================
DurronTwo 3.16 ==============================

vm: java
trial: 0

As you can see, DurronTwo does better for large inputs, because it gets to use the magic trick very very often, but gets clobbered compared to the first algorithm and Math.sqrt because the numbers are so much smaller. Meanwhile, the simpler Durron is a huge winner because it never has to divide by 4 many many times in the first million numbers.

Here's Durron:

public final static boolean isPerfectSquareDurron(long n) {
    if(n < 0) return false;
    if(n == 0) return true;

    long x = n;
    // This is faster because a number is divisible by 16 only 6% of the time
    // and more than that a vanishingly small percentage.
    while((x & 0x3) == 0) x >>= 2;
    // This is effectively the same as the switch-case statement used in the original
    // answer. 
    if((x & 0x7) == 1) {

        long sqrt;
        if(x < 410881L)
        {
            int i;
            float x2, y;

            x2 = x * 0.5F;
            y  = x;
            i  = Float.floatToRawIntBits(y);
            i  = 0x5f3759df - ( i >> 1 );
            y  = Float.intBitsToFloat(i);
            y  = y * ( 1.5F - ( x2 * y * y ) );

            sqrt = (long)(1.0F/y);
        } else {
            sqrt = (long) Math.sqrt(x);
        }
        return sqrt*sqrt == x;
    }
    return false;
}

And DurronTwo

public final static boolean isPerfectSquareDurronTwo(long n) {
    if(n < 0) return false;
    // Needed to prevent infinite loop
    if(n == 0) return true;

    long x = n;
    while((x & 0x3) == 0) x >>= 2;
    if((x & 0x7) == 1) {
        long sqrt;
        if (x < 41529141369L) {
            int i;
            float x2, y;

            x2 = x * 0.5F;
            y = x;
            i = Float.floatToRawIntBits(y);
            //using the magic number from 
            //http://www.lomont.org/Math/Papers/2003/InvSqrt.pdf
            //since it more accurate
            i = 0x5f375a86 - (i >> 1);
            y = Float.intBitsToFloat(i);
            y = y * (1.5F - (x2 * y * y));
            y = y * (1.5F - (x2 * y * y)); //Newton iteration, more accurate
            sqrt = (long) ((1.0F/y) + 0.2);
        } else {
            //Carmack hack gives incorrect answer for n >= 41529141369.
            sqrt = (long) Math.sqrt(x);
        }
        return sqrt*sqrt == x;
    }
    return false;
}

And my benchmark harness: (Requires Google caliper 0.1-rc5)

public class SquareRootBenchmark {
    public static class Benchmark1 extends SimpleBenchmark {
        private static final int ARRAY_SIZE = 10000;
        long[] trials = new long[ARRAY_SIZE];

        @Override
        protected void setUp() throws Exception {
            Random r = new Random();
            for (int i = 0; i < ARRAY_SIZE; i++) {
                trials[i] = Math.abs(r.nextLong());
            }
        }


        public int timeInternet(int reps) {
            int trues = 0;
            for(int i = 0; i < reps; i++) {
                for(int j = 0; j < ARRAY_SIZE; j++) {
                    if(SquareRootAlgs.isPerfectSquareInternet(trials[j])) trues++;
                }
            }

            return trues;   
        }

        public int timeDurron(int reps) {
            int trues = 0;
            for(int i = 0; i < reps; i++) {
                for(int j = 0; j < ARRAY_SIZE; j++) {
                    if(SquareRootAlgs.isPerfectSquareDurron(trials[j])) trues++;
                }
            }

            return trues;   
        }

        public int timeDurronTwo(int reps) {
            int trues = 0;
            for(int i = 0; i < reps; i++) {
                for(int j = 0; j < ARRAY_SIZE; j++) {
                    if(SquareRootAlgs.isPerfectSquareDurronTwo(trials[j])) trues++;
                }
            }

            return trues;   
        }
    }

    public static void main(String... args) {
        Runner.main(Benchmark1.class, args);
    }
}

UPDATE: I've made a new algorithm that is faster in some scenarios, slower in others, I've gotten different benchmarks based on different inputs. If we calculate modulo 0xFFFFFF = 3 x 3 x 5 x 7 x 13 x 17 x 241, we can eliminate 97.82% of numbers that cannot be squares. This can be (sort of) done in one line, with 5 bitwise operations:

if (!goodLookupSquares[(int) ((n & 0xFFFFFFl) + ((n >> 24) & 0xFFFFFFl) + (n >> 48))]) return false;

The resulting index is either 1) the residue, 2) the residue + 0xFFFFFF, or 3) the residue + 0x1FFFFFE. Of course, we need to have a lookup table for residues modulo 0xFFFFFF, which is about a 3mb file (in this case stored as ascii text decimal numbers, not optimal but clearly improvable with a ByteBuffer and so forth. But since that is precalculation it doesn't matter so much. You can find the file here (or generate it yourself):

public final static boolean isPerfectSquareDurronThree(long n) {
    if(n < 0) return false;
    if(n == 0) return true;

    long x = n;
    while((x & 0x3) == 0) x >>= 2;
    if((x & 0x7) == 1) {
        if (!goodLookupSquares[(int) ((n & 0xFFFFFFl) + ((n >> 24) & 0xFFFFFFl) + (n >> 48))]) return false;
        long sqrt;
        if(x < 410881L)
        {
            int i;
            float x2, y;

            x2 = x * 0.5F;
            y  = x;
            i  = Float.floatToRawIntBits(y);
            i  = 0x5f3759df - ( i >> 1 );
            y  = Float.intBitsToFloat(i);
            y  = y * ( 1.5F - ( x2 * y * y ) );

            sqrt = (long)(1.0F/y);
        } else {
            sqrt = (long) Math.sqrt(x);
        }
        return sqrt*sqrt == x;
    }
    return false;
}

I load it into a boolean array like this:

private static boolean[] goodLookupSquares = null;

public static void initGoodLookupSquares() throws Exception {
    Scanner s = new Scanner(new File("24residues_squares.txt"));

    goodLookupSquares = new boolean[0x1FFFFFE];

    while(s.hasNextLine()) {
        int residue = Integer.valueOf(s.nextLine());
        goodLookupSquares[residue] = true;
        goodLookupSquares[residue + 0xFFFFFF] = true;
        goodLookupSquares[residue + 0x1FFFFFE] = true;
    }

    s.close();
}

Example runtime. It beat Durron (version one) in every trial I ran.

 0% Scenario{vm=java, trial=0, benchmark=Internet} 40665.77 ns; ?=566.71 ns @ 10 trials
33% Scenario{vm=java, trial=0, benchmark=Durron} 38397.60 ns; ?=784.30 ns @ 10 trials
67% Scenario{vm=java, trial=0, benchmark=DurronThree} 36171.46 ns; ?=693.02 ns @ 10 trials

  benchmark   us linear runtime
   Internet 40.7 ==============================
     Durron 38.4 ============================
DurronThree 36.2 ==========================

vm: java
trial: 0
share|improve this answer

It's been pointed out that the last d digits of a perfect square can only take on certain values. The last d digits (in base b) of a number n is the same as the remainder when n is divided by bd, ie. in C notation n % pow(b, d).

This can be generalized to any modulus m, ie. n % m can be used to rule out some percentage of numbers from being perfect squares. The modulus you are currently using is 64, which allows 12, ie. 19% of remainders, as possible squares. With a little coding I found the modulus 110880, which allows only 2016, ie. 1.8% of remainders as possible squares. So depending on the cost of a modulus operation (ie. division) and a table lookup versus a square root on your machine, using this modulus might be faster.

By the way if Java has a way to store a packed array of bits for the lookup table, don't use it. 110880 32-bit words is not much RAM these days and fetching a machine word is going to be faster than fetching a single bit.

share|improve this answer

For performance, you very often have to do some compromsies. Others have expressed various methods, however, you noted Carmack's hack was faster up to certain values of N. Then, you should check the "n" and if it is less than that number N, use Carmack's hack, else use some other method described in the answers here.

share|improve this answer

You should get rid of the 2-power part of N right from the start.

2nd Edit The magical expression for m below should be

m = N - (N & (N-1));

and not as written

End of 2nd edit

m = N & (N-1); // the lawest bit of N
N /= m;
byte = N & 0x0F;
if ((m % 2) || (byte !=1 && byte !=9))
  return false;

1st Edit:

Minor improvement:

m = N & (N-1); // the lawest bit of N
N /= m;
if ((m % 2) || (N & 0x07 != 1))
  return false;

End of 1st edit

Now continue as usual. This way, by the time you get to the floating point part, you already got rid of all the numbers whose 2-power part is odd (about half), and then you only consider 1/8 of whats left. I.e. you run the floating point part on 6% of the numbers.

share|improve this answer

This a rework from decimal to binary of the old Marchant calculator algorithm (sorry, I don't have a reference), in Ruby, adapted specifically for this question:

def isexactsqrt(v)
    value = v.abs
    residue = value
    root = 0
    onebit = 1
    onebit <<= 8 while (onebit < residue)
    onebit >>= 2 while (onebit > residue)
    while (onebit > 0)
    	x = root + onebit
    	if (residue >= x) then
    		residue -= x
    		root = x + onebit
    	end
    	root >>= 1
    	onebit >>= 2
    end
    return (residue == 0)
end

Here's a workup of something similar (please don't vote me down for coding style/smells or clunky O/O - it's the algorithm that counts, and C++ is not my home language). In this case, we're looking for residue == 0:

#include <iostream>  

using namespace std;  
typedef unsigned long long int llint;

class ISqrt {   		// Integer Square Root
    llint value;		// Integer whose square root is required
    llint root;			// Result: floor(sqrt(value))
    llint residue;		// Result: value-root*root
    llint onebit, x;	// Working bit, working value

public:

    ISqrt(llint v = 2) {	// Constructor
    	Root(v);			// Take the root 
    };

    llint Root(llint r) {	// Resets and calculates new square root
    	value = r;			// Store input
    	residue = value;	// Initialise for subtracting down
    	root = 0;			// Clear root accumulator

    	onebit = 1;					// Calculate start value of counter
    	onebit <<= (8*sizeof(llint)-2);			// Set up counter bit as greatest odd power of 2 
    	while (onebit > residue) {onebit >>= 2; };	// Shift down until just < value

    	while (onebit > 0) {
    		x = root ^ onebit;			// Will check root+1bit (root bit corresponding to onebit is always zero)
    		if (residue >= x) {			// Room to subtract?
    			residue -= x;			// Yes - deduct from residue
    			root = x + onebit;		// and step root
    		};
    		root >>= 1;
    		onebit >>= 2;
    	};
    	return root;					
    };
    llint Residue() {			// Returns residue from last calculation
    	return residue;					
    };
};

int main() {
    llint big, i, q, r, v, delta;
    big = 0; big = (big-1);			// Kludge for "big number"
    ISqrt b;							// Make q sqrt generator
    for ( i = big; i > 0 ; i /= 7 ) {	// for several numbers
    	q = b.Root(i);					// Get the square root
    	r = b.Residue();				// Get the residue
    	v = q*q+r;						// Recalc original value
    	delta = v-i;					// And diff, hopefully 0
    	cout << i << ": " << q << " ++ " << r << " V: " << v << " Delta: " << delta << "\n";
    };
    return 0;
};
share|improve this answer
1  
Is there really any substantive difference between the run time of XOR and addition anyway? –  Tadmas Jan 2 '09 at 22:59

I like the idea to use an almost correct method on some of the input. Here is a version with a higher "offset". The code seems to work and passes my simple test case.

Just replace your:

if(n < 410881L){...}

code with this one:

if (n < 11043908100L) {
    //John Carmack hack, converted to Java.
    // See: http://www.codemaestro.com/reviews/9
    int i;
    float x2, y;

    x2 = n * 0.5F;
    y = n;
    i = Float.floatToRawIntBits(y);
    //using the magic number from 
    //http://www.lomont.org/Math/Papers/2003/InvSqrt.pdf
    //since it more accurate
    i = 0x5f375a86 - (i >> 1);
    y = Float.intBitsToFloat(i);
    y = y * (1.5F - (x2 * y * y));
    y = y * (1.5F - (x2 * y * y)); //Newton iteration, more accurate

    sqrt = Math.round(1.0F / y);
} else {
    //Carmack hack gives incorrect answer for n >= 11043908100.
    sqrt = (long) Math.sqrt(n);
}
share|improve this answer

An integer problem deserves an integer solution. Thus

Do binary search on the (non-negative) integers to find the greatest integer t such that t**2 <= n. Then test whether r**2 = n exactly. This takes time O(log n).

If you don't know how to binary search the positive integers because the set is unbounded, it's easy. You starting by computing your increasing function f (above f(t) = t**2 - n) on powers of two. When you see it turn positive, you've found an upper bound. Then you can do standard binary search.

share|improve this answer

I would have to ask (maybe the answer is NO) couldn't you just enumerate the squares, rather than enumerate the numbers and ask if they are squares. (i.e. think outside the box)

share|improve this answer
1  
What I meant was, like in my business (biostat), we're adjusting matrix M to maximize a data fit, but M has to have a well-defined square root. Instead we adjust another matrix C where M=C*C, and never have to worry about square root. –  Mike Dunlavey Nov 19 '08 at 18:24

Just for the record, another approach is to use the prime decomposition. If every factor of the decomposition is even, then the number is a perfect square. So what you want is to see if a number can be decomposed as a product of squares of prime numbers. Of course, you don't need to obtain such a decomposition, just to see if it exists.

First build a table of squares of prime numbers which are lower than 2^32. This is far smaller than a table of all integers up to this limit.

A solution would then be like this:

boolean isPerfectSquare(long number)
{
    if (number < 0) return false;
    if (number < 2) return true;

    for (int i = 0; ; i++)
    {
        long square = squareTable[i];
        if (square > number) return false;
        while (number % square == 0)
        {
            number /= square;
        }
        if (number == 1) return true;
    }
}

I guess it's a bit cryptic. What it does is checking in every step that the square of a prime number divide the input number. If it does then it divides the number by the square as long as it is possible, to remove this square from the prime decomposition. If by this process, we came to 1, then the input number was a decomposition of square of prime numbers. If the square becomes larger than the number itself, then there is no way this square, or any larger squares, can divide it, so the number can not be a decomposition of squares of prime numbers.

Given nowadays' sqrt done in hardware and the need to compute prime numbers here, I guess this solution is way slower. But it should give better results than solution with sqrt which won't work over 2^54, as says mrzl in his answer.

share|improve this answer

The sqrt call is not perfectly accurate, as has been mentioned, but it's interesting and instructive that it doesn't blow away the other answers in terms of speed. After all, the sequence of assembly language instructions for a sqrt is tiny. Intel has a hardware instruction, which isn't used by Java I believe because it doesn't conform to IEEE.

So why is it slow? Because Java is actually calling a C routine through JNI, and it's actually slower to do so than to call a Java subroutine, which itself is slower than doing it inline. This is very annoying, and Java should have come up with a better solution, ie building in floating point library calls if necessary. Oh well.

In C++, I suspect all the complex alternatives would lose on speed, but I haven't checked them all. What I did, and what Java people will find usefull, is a simple hack, an extension of the special case testing suggested by A. Rex. Use a single long value as a bit array, which isn't bounds checked. That way, you have 64 bit boolean lookup.

typedef unsigned long long UVLONG
UVLONG pp1,pp2;

void init2() {
  for (int i = 0; i < 64; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 64; j++)
      if (isPerfectSquare(i * 64 + j)) {
    pp1 |= (1 << j);
    pp2 |= (1 << i);
    break;
      }
   }
   cout << "pp1=" << pp1 << "," << pp2 << "\n";  
}


inline bool isPerfectSquare5(UVLONG x) {
  return pp1 & (1 << (x & 0x3F)) ? isPerfectSquare(x) : false;
}

The routine isPerfectSquare5 runs in about 1/3 the time on my core2 duo machine. I suspect that further tweaks along the same lines could reduce the time further on average, but every time you check, you are trading off more testing for more eliminating, so you can't go too much farther on that road.

Certainly, rather than having a separate test for negative, you could check the high 6 bits the same way.

Note that all I'm doing is eliminating possible squares, but when I have a potential case I have to call the original, inlined isPerfectSquare.

The init2 routine is called once to initialize the static values of pp1 and pp2. Note that in my implementation in C++, I'm using unsigned long long, so since you're signed, you'd have to use the >>> operator.

There is no intrinsic need to bounds check the array, but Java's optimizer has to figure this stuff out pretty quickly, so I don't blame them for that.

share|improve this answer

Project Euler is mentioned in the tags and many of the problems in it require checking numbers >> 2^64. Most of the optimizations mentioned above don't work easily when you are working with an 80 byte buffer.

I used java BigInteger and a slightly modified version of Newton's method, one that works better with integers. The problem was that exact squares n^2 converged to (n-1) instead of n because n^2-1 = (n-1)(n+1) and the final error was just one step below the final divisor and the algorithm terminated. It was easy to fix by adding one to the original argument before computing the error. (Add two for cube roots, etc.)

One nice attribute of this algorithm is that you can immediately tell if the number is a perfect square - the final error (not correction) in Newton's method will be zero. A simple modification also lets you quickly calculate floor(sqrt(x)) instead of the closest integer. This is handy with several Euler problems.

share|improve this answer

This is the fastest Java implementation I could come up with, using a combination of techniques suggested by others in this thread.

  • Mod-256 test
  • Inexact mod-3465 test (avoids integer division at the cost of some false positives)
  • Floating-point square root, round and compare with input value

I also experimented with these modifications but they did not help performance:

  • Additional mod-255 test
  • Dividing the input value by powers of 4
  • Fast Inverse Square Root (to work for high values of N it needs 3 iterations, enough to make it slower than the hardware square root function.)

public class SquareTester {

    public static boolean isPerfectSquare(long n) {
        if (n < 0) {
            return false;
        } else {
            switch ((byte) n) {
            case -128: case -127: case -124: case -119: case -112:
            case -111: case -103: case  -95: case  -92: case  -87:
            case  -79: case  -71: case  -64: case  -63: case  -60:
            case  -55: case  -47: case  -39: case  -31: case  -28:
            case  -23: case  -15: case   -7: case    0: case    1:
            case    4: case    9: case   16: case   17: case   25:
            case   33: case   36: case   41: case   49: case   57:
            case   64: case   65: case   68: case   73: case   81:
            case   89: case   97: case  100: case  105: case  113:
            case  121:
                long i = (n * INV3465) >>> 52;
                if (! good3465[(int) i]) {
                    return false;
                } else {
                    long r = round(Math.sqrt(n));
                    return r*r == n; 
                }
            default:
                return false;
            }
        }
    }

    private static int round(double x) {
        return (int) Double.doubleToRawLongBits(x + (double) (1L << 52));
    }

    /** 3465<sup>-1</sup> modulo 2<sup>64</sup> */
    private static final long INV3465 = 0x8ffed161732e78b9L;

    private static final boolean[] good3465 =
        new boolean[0x1000];

    static {
        for (int r = 0; r < 3465; ++ r) {
            int i = (int) ((r * r * INV3465) >>> 52);
            good3465[i] = good3465[i+1] = true;
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer

If you want speed, given that your integers are of finite size, I suspect that the quickest way would involve (a) partitioning the parameters by size (e.g. into categories by largest bit set), then checking the value against an array of perfect squares within that range.

share|improve this answer
2  
yes, but the range of a long is 64 bits, not 32 bits. sqrt(2^64)=2^32. (i'm ignoring the sign bit to make the math a little easier... there are actually (long)(2^31.5)=3037000499 perfect squares) –  Kip Dec 2 '08 at 19:14

Don't know about fastest, but the simplest is to take the square root in the normal fashion, multiply the result by itself, and see if it matches your original value.

Since we're talking integers here, the fasted would probably involve a collection where you can just make a lookup.

share|improve this answer

If speed is a concern, why not partition off the most commonly used set of inputs and their values to a lookup table and then do whatever optimized magic algorithm you have come up with for the exceptional cases?

share|improve this answer

Regarding the Carmac method, it seems like it would be quite easy just to iterate once more, which should double the number of digits of accuracy. It is, after all, an extremely truncated iterative method -- Newton's, with a very good first guess.

Regarding your current best, I see two micro-optimizations:

  • move the check vs. 0 after the check using mod255
  • rearrange the dividing out powers of four to skip all the checks for the usual (75%) case.

I.e:

// Divide out powers of 4 using binary search

if((n & 0x3L) == 0) {
  n >>=2;

  if((n & 0xffffffffL) == 0)
    n >>= 32;
  if((n & 0xffffL) == 0)
      n >>= 16;
  if((n & 0xffL) == 0)
      n >>= 8;
  if((n & 0xfL) == 0)
      n >>= 4;
  if((n & 0x3L) == 0)
      n >>= 2;
}

Even better might be a simple

while ((n & 0x03L) == 0) n >>= 2;

Obviously, it would be interesting to know how many numbers get culled at each checkpoint -- I rather doubt the checks are truly independent, which makes things tricky.

share|improve this answer

"I'm looking for the fastest way to determine if a long value is a perfect square (i.e. its square root is another integer)."

The answers are impressive, but I failed to see a simple check :

check whether the first number on the right of the long it a member of the set (0,1,4,5,6,9) . If it is not, then it cannot possibly be a 'perfect square' .

eg.

4567 - cannot be a perfect square.

share|improve this answer
3  
actually this has been suggested, only in different bases. Checking the last base-10 digit requires taking n%10, which is a division (and thus expensive). Besides, this would only eliminate 40% of possible values. In base-16, you can find the last hex-digit with n&0xf, which is a very fast bit-wise operation. In base 16, the last digit of a perfect square has to be 0, 1, 4, or 9, which means that 75% of numbers are eliminated by that check. –  Kip Sep 24 '09 at 13:42

It ought to be possible to pack the 'cannot be a perfect square if the last X digits are N' much more efficiently than that! I'll use java 32 bit ints, and produce enough data to check the last 16 bits of the number - that's 2048 hexadecimal int values.

...

Ok. Either I have run into some number theory that is a little beyond me, or there is a bug in my code. In any case, here is the code:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    final int BITS = 16;

    BitSet foo = new BitSet();

    for(int i = 0; i< (1<<BITS); i++) {
        int sq = (i*i);
        sq = sq & ((1<<BITS)-1);
        foo.set(sq);
    }

    System.out.println("int[] mayBeASquare = {");

    for(int i = 0; i< 1<<(BITS-5); i++) {
        int kk = 0;
        for(int j = 0; j<32; j++) {
            if(foo.get((i << 5) | j)) {
                kk |= 1<<j;
            }
        }
        System.out.print("0x" + Integer.toHexString(kk) + ", ");
        if(i%8 == 7) System.out.println();
    }
    System.out.println("};");
}

and here are the results:

(ed: elided for poor performance in prettify.js; view revision history to see.)

share|improve this answer

I checked all of the possible results when the last n bits of a square is observed. By successively examining more bits, up to 5/6th of inputs can be eliminated. I actually designed this to implement Fermat's Factorization algorithm, and it is very fast there.

public static boolean isSquare(final long val) {
   if ((val & 2) == 2 || (val & 7) == 5) {
     return false;
   }
   if ((val & 11) == 8 || (val & 31) == 20) {
     return false;
   }

   if ((val & 47) == 32 || (val & 127) == 80) {
     return false;
   }

   if ((val & 191) == 128 || (val & 511) == 320) {
     return false;
   }

   // if((val & a == b) || (val & c == d){
   //   return false;
   // }

   if (!modSq[(int) (val % modSq.length)]) {
        return false;
   }

   final long root = (long) Math.sqrt(val);
   return root * root == val;
}

The last bit of pseudocode can be used to extend the tests to eliminate more values. The tests above are for k = 0, 1, 2, 3

  • a is of the form (3 << 2k) - 1
  • b is of the form (2 << 2k)
  • c is of the form (2 << 2k + 2) - 1
  • d is of the form (2 << 2k - 1) * 10

    It first tests whether it has a square residual with moduli of power of two, then it tests based on a final modulus, then it uses the Math.sqrt to do a final test. I came up with the idea from the top post, and attempted to extend upon it. I appreciate any comments or suggestions.

    Update: Using the test by a modulus, (modSq) and a modulus base of 44352, my test runs in 96% of the time of the one in the OP's update for numbers up to 1,000,000,000.

  • share|improve this answer

    Considering for general bit length (though I have used specific type here), I tried to design simplistic algo as below. Simple and obvious check for 0,1,2 or <0 is required initially. Following is simple in sense that it doesn't try to use any existing maths functions. Most of the operator can be replaced with bit-wise operators. I haven't tested with any bench mark data though. I'm neither expert at maths or computer algorithm design in particular, I would love to see you pointing out problem. I know there is lots of improvement chances there.

    int main()
    {
        unsigned int c1=0 ,c2 = 0;  
        unsigned int x = 0;  
        unsigned int p = 0;  
        int k1 = 0;  
        scanf("%d",&p);  
        if(p % 2 == 0) {  
            x = p/2; 
        }  
        else {  
            x = (p/2) +1;  
        }  
        while(x) 
    {
            if((x*x) > p) {  
                    c1 = x;  
                    x = x/2; 
                }else {  
                    c2 = x;  
                    break;  
                }  
            }  
             if((p%2) != 0)  
                 c2++;
    
    while(c2 < c1) 
    {  
       if((c2 * c2 ) == p) {  
            k1 = 1;  
        break;  
                }  
                c2++; 
            }  
            if(k1)  
                printf("\n Perfect square for %d",c2);  
             else  
                 printf("\n Not perfect but nearest to :%d :",c2);  
             return 0;  
        }  
    
    share|improve this answer
    3  
    incomplete code. :( –  st0le Dec 4 '10 at 4:20

    The following simplification of maaartinus's solution appears to shave a few percentage points off the runtime, but I'm not good enough at benchmarking to produce a benchmark I can trust:

    long goodMask; // 0xC840C04048404040 computed below
    {
        for (int i=0; i<64; ++i) goodMask |= Long.MIN_VALUE >>> (i*i);
    }
    
    public boolean isSquare(long x) {
        // This tests if the 6 least significant bits are right.
        // Moving the to be tested bit to the highest position saves us masking.
        if (goodMask << x >= 0) return false;
        // Remove an even number of trailing zeros, leaving at most one.
        x >>= (Long.numberOfTrailingZeros(x) & (-2);
        // Repeat the test on the 6 least significant remaining bits.
        if (goodMask << x >= 0 | x <= 0) return x == 0;
        // Do it in the classical way.
        // The correctness is not trivial as the conversion from long to double is lossy!
        final long tst = (long) Math.sqrt(x);
        return tst * tst == x;
    }
    

    It would be worth checking how omitting the first test,

    if (goodMask << x >= 0) return false;
    

    would affect performance.

    share|improve this answer
    1  
    The results are here. Removing the first test is bad as it solves most cases pretty cheaply. The source is in my answer (updated). –  maaartinus Jul 16 at 11:45

    Premature Optimization Is The Root Of All Evil

    Today FPUs fast and support squarerooting. Also the multiplication is really fast. So you should really check if the this computation is a bottleneck and a newer version is faster. E.g. lookup tables were often used to accelerate trigonometric/sqrt computations. But we have now times, where not the computation is the bottleneck, but the io to the memory. That means that lut are only usefull if you speedup a long calculation (and not something the fpu could compute in one instruction in 100 cycles). If you have a really huge cache, and no other application data which could get into it, you maybe can avoid the mem load penalty, but often it is not really helpfull. Same goes for other approach: most of the iterative/fixpoint/series approaches take for sure longer than the normal fpu sqrt.

    To suggest some points to optimize: Sadly you program java, there is very few control for the generated/executed asm code, but to give you some hints were you could look:

    Check your CPU instruction manual which floating point operation the fpu supports: common restrictions are:

    -only float support, no double

    Here you should switch to float instead of double (I know no java std api function which does the sqrt on the float instead of double)

    -no support of sqrt, but of 1/sqrt

    In this case you should rewrite the code (I hope your java interpreter is smart enough to utilize this), e.g. as:

    reci_sqrt = 1.0 / Math.sqrt(number); // gets calculated in one asm instruction
    is_sqrt = Math.round(number * reci_sqrt  * reci_sqrt) == 1;
    

    (In this example you would trade a division for a multiplication, if its really worth depends on your cpu))

    share|improve this answer

    protected by Luksprog Sep 18 '12 at 9:48

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