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I am refactoring a method which is over 500 lines (don't ask me why)

The method basically queries a list of maps from the database and for each map in the list does some computation and adds the value of that computation to the map. There are however too many computations and puts being done that the code has reached over 500 lines already!

Here's a sample preview:

public List<Hashmap> getProductData(...) {
   List<Hashmap> products = productsDao.getProductData(...);
   for (Product product: products) {
       product.put("Volume",new BigDecimanl(product.get("Height")*
              product.get("Width")*product.get("Length"));
   //over 10 more lines like the one above
      if (some condition here) {
         //20 lines worth of product.put(..,..) 
      } else {
         //20 lines worth of product.put(..,..)
      }
      //3 more if-else statements like the one above
      try {
         product.put(..,..)
      } catch (Exception e) {
         product.put("",..)
      }
      //over 8 more try-catches of the form above
   }

Any ideas on how to go about refactoring this?

share|improve this question
1  
Have you read Martin Fowlers Refactoring book? I really can't recommend it enough. It explains refactoring techniques in a way that any level of programmer can understand, so not only is it the defacto book on refactoring (Clean Code and Working with legacy code being worthy condendors), it is probably one of the best written technical books – Robben_Ford_Fan_boy Jun 2 '10 at 10:45

A simple idea that comes to my mind for dividing a method is "find smaller tasks with sense" so here are some hints:

Make a method for the item-level

processCollection(collection) {
// startup code
for (Item i: collection)
  processCollectionItem(i, ...other args...);
// final code
}

Try to cut each commented block in its own method

// does a
instr 1
instr 2
instr 3
instr 4
// does b
instr 5
instr 6
instr 7
instr 8

converts to

a(...);
b(...);

Try to see if some bunch of lines are a concrete expression of some general pattern

map.put(a[0], b[0]);
map.put(a[1], b[1]);
...

converts to

putKeysAndValues(a, b);

with

putKeysAndValues(a, b) {
  for (int i=0; i<a.length; i++)
     map.put(a[i], b[i]);
}
share|improve this answer

This depends on the business logic, but the most straightforward way to go is to split the long method into smaller ones:

for (Product product: products) {
   handleProduct(product);
}


private void handleProduct(Product product) throws Exception {
  if (condition1) {
     handleProduct1(product);
  }
}

This will make much more sense if each condition matches to a specific business case and has a meaningful name.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 thanks for answering. This is definitely one of the things I am considering. – Jeune Jun 2 '10 at 12:52

It's difficult to provide a detailed answer without more information but one approach you could consider is:

  • Remodel a product using a Product class hierarchy rather than representing each product as a Map of (name, value) pairs. The current Map representation means that many errors are not going to be detected until run-time; better to prefer stronger typing so you can perform more checks at compile-time.
  • Define a template method on the top-level Product class or interface that performs much of the processing currently defined in your 500 line method. For example, you could pass in a visitor to the template method as per the below code extract.

Example

/**
 * Our visitor definition, responsible for processing each product.
 */
public interface ProductVisitor {
  void processProductA(ConcreteProductA a);

  void processProductB(ConcreteProductB b);
}

/**
 * Top-level product definition.
 */
public interface Product {
  void process(ProductVisitor v);
}

/**
 * A conrete product implementation.  Makes a callback to the visitor
 * allowing itself to be processed.
 */
public class ConcreteProductA implements Product {
  public void process(ProductVisitor v) {
    v.processProductA(this);
  }
}

/**
 * As per the previous product implementation but makes a *different*
 * callback to the visitor.
 */
public class ConcreteProductB implements Product {
  public void process(ProductVisitor v) {
    v.processProductB(this);
  }
}

The main advantage with this approach is that you avoid lots of explicit if-then blocks in your code making the design more loosely coupled. The disadvantage is it can make code less readable.

share|improve this answer
    
I have heard this pattern before. I'll prolly do this after decomposing the larger method +1 – Jeune Jun 2 '10 at 12:54
    
Oops, I just realized the problem of using the map goes all the way to the top e.g the method I am returning the map to.They insist on using a map. So I have no choice but to stick to the map. Right now, I am can still somehow the apply the pattern but using maps instead. @-) – Jeune Jun 2 '10 at 14:14
    
Despite this, you could convert the map internally to a Product implementation. At this point you could check whether the combination of map parameters constitutes a valid product. This is neat as it means you fail-fast at the beginning and can throw a relevant exception; e.g. InvalidProductException. – Adamski Jun 2 '10 at 16:52

Assuming you can't change the dao... This is how I would approach it, not necessarily correct:

public List<Hashmap> getProductData(...) {
   List<Hashmap> products = productsDao.getProductData(...);
   try{
     addVolume(products);
     ...
     doCondition1(products);
     ...
   } catch (E1 e){
     ...
   } ... {
   }
}

public addVolume(List<HashMap> products) throws E1, E2, ... {
  for(HashMap product : products){
    product.put("Volume",new BigDecimanl(product.get("Height")*
              product.get("Width")*product.get("Length"));
  }
}

... do other things ...

public doCondition1(List<HashMap> products) throws E1, E2, ...{
  for(HashMap product : products){
    if(condition1){
      ...
    }else{
      ...
    }
  }
}

...condition 2, condition 3, ...

Of course, you can put the loop inside your

getProductData(...)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 As its key to start with small steps - testing after each step – Robben_Ford_Fan_boy Jun 2 '10 at 10:47

you can shorten the method by moving the conditional puts to a separate method and invoke it from the current method.

eg.

...
if (some condition here) 
 { method1(map);} 
  else 
{method2(map);}

Also if there are common tasks, pull them in separate methods as well.

share|improve this answer

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