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According to http://www.lagmonster.org/docs/vi2.html the command :p would make vi go to the previous file. Unfortunately, this isn't working for me. However :n works and goes to the next page. What should I use to go to the previous file? For :p I get the message,

Hit Return to continue

and it stays in the same page. Thanks.

Edit: I am sshing to an AIX box and using the vi in Ksh if that helps. Edit 2: Looks like rewinding to first is possible with :rew but listing all the files with :ar results in the same message,

Hit Return to continue

May be this isn't possible at all from all the vi tutorials I've read so far including, http://www.bo.infn.it/alice/alice-doc/mll-doc/linux/vi-ex/node27.html

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A lot of answers here tend to give solutions for vim while you seem to use vi. If you don't want to or can't switch to vim, i suggest you remove the vim tag from your question, as it would then be very misleading. –  ereOn Jun 2 '10 at 11:36
    
Ok. I thought vim users probably would have used vi before as it is "Vi improved" –  learner135 Jun 2 '10 at 11:42
    
I wish I did so I would know all the differences between the two. But I believe a lot of people using Vim never used Vi before. At least in the some I know. –  ereOn Jun 2 '10 at 16:04
    
@learner125: vim was initially released in '91, at a time when many of us were just tots. :) So, a great many people have just gone straight to vim, as vi offers no real benefit over it. –  Xiong Chiamiov Jun 3 '10 at 23:26
    
I don't think you can move backwards through a list of files in the original vi. I think you could move to the previously file (edited & viewed both), rewind, or move to the next file. See my answer below for more. –  Tim Perry Mar 8 '11 at 18:12

4 Answers 4

According to Vim's help, :N (uppercase!) should be legal vi to go back a file:

:[count]n[ext] [++opt] [+cmd]           *:n* *:ne* *:next* *E165* *E163*
            Edit [count] next file.  This fails when changes have
            been made and Vim does not want to |abandon| the
            current buffer.  Also see |++opt| and |+cmd|.  {Vi: no
            count or ++opt}.


:[count]N[ext] [count] [++opt] [+cmd]           *:Next* *:N* *E164*
            Edit [count] previous file in argument list.  This
            fails when changes have been made and Vim does not
            want to |abandon| the current buffer.
            Also see |++opt| and |+cmd|.  {Vi: no count or ++opt}.
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That doesn't work too. Maybe because I am using vi and not vim. –  learner135 Jun 2 '10 at 11:26
    
@learner: What version of vi are you using? Is it possibly a non-compliant or otherwise non-standard version? –  Mark Rushakoff Jun 2 '10 at 16:04
    
I don't know. Is there a command to find that? I am using the default vi present in AIX 5.3 which is not very old I guess. Edit: (AIX 5.3 was released 2004, acc to wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_AIX) –  learner135 Jun 3 '10 at 5:59
    
@learner135: if you start vi with no file it should give you some version information. At least, it does on my system were vi actually starts vim. –  Tim Perry Mar 8 '11 at 18:48

According to the vi manual page from AIX 5.2, this isn't possible:

Editing a List of Files: Enter the following subcommands in command mode. If you
need information about the format of vi subcommands, see ″vi General Subcommand
Syntax.″
:n             Edits the next file in the list entered on the command line. If
               you are using this subcommand from the ex editor, a : (colon) is
               not needed.
:n Files       Specifies a new list of files to edit. If you are using this
               subcommand from the ex editor, a : (colon) is not needed.

Check the vi manual (man vi) on your system, maybe it's been updated in AIX 5.3.

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Tried :bn, :bp ?

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Yep I did!No gain. It was suggested by another user who later decided to delete it for some reason. I get "Not an editor command" message for that. –  learner135 Jun 2 '10 at 13:50
    
This is really a comment, not an answer to the question. Please use "add comment" to leave feedback for the author. –  walther Aug 22 '12 at 8:21

For posterity's sake user :prev or :previous

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This is really a comment, not an answer to the question. You can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  Thor Aug 16 '12 at 14:16

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