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I need to validate an Irish phone number but I don't want to make it too user unfriendly, many people are used to writing there phone number with brackets wrapping their area code followed by 5 to 7 digits for their number, some add spaces between the area code or mobile operator.

The format of Irish landline numbers is an area code of between 1 and 4 digits and a number of between 5 to 8 digits.

e.g.

(021) 9876543
(01)9876543
01 9876543
(0402)39385

I'm looking for a regular expression for Javascript/PHP.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
"an area code of between 1 and 4 digits". No, the shortest area codes are two digits. Also, all area codes start with 0, except for special codes, which start with 1. (1800 freephone, 1890 local call, 1580 expensive, etc.) – TRiG Jun 2 '10 at 12:05
    
TRiG, technically, you're right. But with Dublin (01), some people are used to writing simply (1) the same as Cork people write (21) usually because they've added the country code in first +353 1 1234567 I don't want to confuse these people any further than I need to. Cheers. – Herbage Onion Jun 2 '10 at 12:21
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This might work. It should account for appearances of spaces anywhere in phone number.

preg_match('|^\s*\(?\s*\d{1,4}\s*\)?\s*[\d\s]{5,10}\s*$|', $phone);

People sometimes split phone number part into 2 parts by spaces.

Update: if you wish to validate phone number and trim spaces at the same time, you can do it like this:

if (preg_match('|^\s*(\(?\s*\d{1,4}\s*\)?\s*[\d\s]{5,10})\s*$|', $phone, $m))
{
    echo $m[1];
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's awesome. Almost perfect. Is there anyway to trim the space at the beginning and the end? – Herbage Onion Jun 2 '10 at 12:11
    
Either use trim($phone) before matching, or put ( and ) after and before first/final \s* in matching string, and then read first matched string. I'll update my answer. – mr.b Jun 2 '10 at 12:15
    
Thanks mr.b, I'm already trimming on the server side, I just wanted to do it on the client side aswell, I'm using $.trim in jQuery but I also wanted it to fail if the spaces were there. Although, thinkiing about it again, it seems like overkill. – Herbage Onion Jun 2 '10 at 12:26
    
This answer would not account for a phone number including the international dialing code such as "00353 049 854 4070". – Tom Halley Aug 28 '12 at 8:32
2  
@TomHalley true, however, it wasn't one of OP's requirements. Here's a modified regex: ^\s*(?:(?:00|\+)[\d]{1,3}\s*)?\(?\s*\d{1,4}\s*\)?\s*[\d\s]{5,10}\s*$. It would match both +xyz or 00xyz, where xyz is 1-3 digit long country code, so in the end it would match 00353 049 854 4070 and 049 854 4070 and (049) 854 4070 etc.. – mr.b Aug 28 '12 at 20:33

It may be worth taking a look at the Validate_IE class - it contains a phoneNumber function which handles a variety of possible Irish phone numbers (with/without area codes, mobile numbers, mobile shortcodes, etc).

Also, if you're working with Irish data, it has a series of additional methods that may one day come in handy for validating everything from Irish bank accounts to driving licence numbers, well worth a look!

share|improve this answer

If it were me, I'd strip spaces and brackets, then verify it's between the minimum and maximum length.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, that's how I'd do it. – Josh Jun 2 '10 at 12:15

Try this one:

http://regexlib.com/REDetails.aspx?regexp_id=2485

Modified version excluding the area code:

\d{3}\s\d{4}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Simon, cheers for the reply, I don't want the country code because I'm handling that seperately and using /^\(0\)\s\d\s\d{3}\s\d{4}$/ doesn't seem to work the way I want – Herbage Onion Jun 2 '10 at 12:04

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