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is it possible to write a single character using a syscall from within an inline assembly block? if so, how? it should look "something" like this:

__asm__ __volatile__
                    (
                     " movl $1,  %%edx \n\t"
                     " movl $80, %%ecx \n\t"
                     " movl $0,  %%ebx \n\t"
                     " movl $4,  %%eax \n\t"
                     " int $0x80       \n\t"
                     ::: "%eax", "%ebx", "%ecx", "%edx"
                    );

$80 is 'P' in ascii, but that returns nothing.

any suggestions much appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
What operating system ? –  Paul R Jun 2 '10 at 13:49
    
@Paul_R: linux, x86 –  guest Jun 2 '10 at 13:52
    
OK - I've added the linux tag for you –  Paul R Jun 2 '10 at 14:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something like


char p = 'P';

int main()
{
__asm__ __volatile__
                    (
                     " movl $1,  %%edx \n\t"
                     " leal p , %%ecx \n\t"
                     " movl $0,  %%ebx \n\t"
                     " movl $4,  %%eax \n\t"
                     " int $0x80       \n\t"
                     ::: "%eax", "%ebx", "%ecx", "%edx"
                    );
}

Add: note that I've used lea to Load the Effective Address of the char into ecx register; for the value of ebx I tried $0 and $1 and it seems to work anyway ...

Avoid the use of external char

int main()
{
__asm__ __volatile__
                    (
                     " movl $1,  %%edx \n\t"
                     " subl $4, %%esp \n\t"
                     " movl $80, (%%esp)\n\t"
                     " movl %%esp, %%ecx \n\t"
                     " movl $1,  %%ebx \n\t"
                     " movl $4,  %%eax \n\t"
                     " int $0x80       \n\t"
                     " addl $4, %%esp\n\t"
                     ::: "%eax", "%ebx", "%ecx", "%edx"
                    );
}

N.B.: it works because of the endianness of intel processors! :D

share|improve this answer
    
ah. i'm not that good with assembly yet, so i got basically no idea about lea and the like.. also, 0 & 1 are stderr, and stdout resp. iirc –  guest Jun 2 '10 at 14:30
    
of course you can use the stack; the gcc-generated code uses ebp it prepared it before; we can stick to use just esp for the moment; I've modified the answer, see it. –  ShinTakezou Jun 2 '10 at 14:41
    
awesome!! can it also be done with a push and the stackpointer? –  guest Jun 2 '10 at 14:45
    
you can mke my code better thanks to suggestion of using push (but pushb does not exist and anyway it would "de-align" the stack...): remove subl $4,%esp and instead of movl $80, (%esp) put pushl $80; the rest is the same. –  ShinTakezou Jun 2 '10 at 14:58
    
uh seen now your comment; yes as said you can use pushl and avoid decrementing the stack by hand; esp is the stackpointer; to use the base/frame pointer ebp or how you call it, you should preserve the previous value of it in use by C for local variables;... so after all it is not so useful, in this case esp is easier –  ShinTakezou Jun 2 '10 at 15:01

IIRC, two things are wrong in your example. Firstly, you're writing to stdin with mov $0, %ebx Second, write takes a pointer as it's second argument, so to write a single character you need that character stored somewhere in memory, you can't write the value directly to %ecx

ex:
.data
char: .byte 80
.text
mov $char, %ecx

I've only done pure asm in linux, never inline using gcc, you can't drop data into the middle of the assembly, so I'm not sure how you'd get the pointer using inline assembly.

EDIT: I think I just remembered how to do it. you could push 'p' onto the stack and use %esp

pushw $80
movl %%esp, %%ecx
... int $0x80 ...
addl $2, %%esp

share|improve this answer
    
in C i do "the same" with char *p = 'P'; write(1, &p, 1);, so stdout is 1 –  guest Jun 2 '10 at 14:27
    
char *p = 'P' should be char p = 'P' I suppose. –  ShinTakezou Jun 2 '10 at 14:29
    
write() takes const void *buf as its second argument –  guest Jun 2 '10 at 14:32
    
just figured, you are right of course! should be char p –  guest Jun 2 '10 at 14:39
    
thx! i was just wondering how that would work with push.. what is the difference in using push and pushb, tho? and do i have to pop them, when i'm done? –  guest Jun 2 '10 at 14:55

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