Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have two methods f(vector<int>& x, ....) and g(DBConn& x, ....) where the (....) parameters are all identical.

The code inside the two methods are completely identical except for one statement where we do different actions based on the type of x:

in f(): we do x.push_back(i)
in g(): we do x.DeleteRow(i)

What is the simplest way to extract the common code into one method and yet have the two different statements?

I am thinking of having a templated functor that overloads operator () (int a) but that seems overkill.

share|improve this question
    
Can the code ever evolve differently for the two? If so, leave them as they are as their similarity is just coincidental. – JRL Jun 2 '10 at 13:51
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could write a simple adapter with two implementations, each calling the desired method of a different class.

class MyInterface {
public:
  virtual doIt(int i) = 0;
}

class VectorImp : public MyInterface {
public:
  vector<int>& v;
  VectorImp(vector<int>& theVector) : v(theVector) {}
  doIt(int i) { x.push_back(i); }
}

class DbImp : public MyInterface {
public:
  DBConn& c;
  VectorImp(DBConn& conn) : c(conn) {}
  doIt(int i) { c.DeleteRow(i); }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I prefer this over templates for two reasons. Firstly, it will only generate compiled code for one instance of the f/g function, templates would normally generate compiled code for each template instantiation. Secondly, I see templates as 'do the same thing regardless of type', but this is 'do a different thing depending on type'. – Skizz Jun 2 '10 at 14:27
    
I am not going for it as it adds next level of indirection with virtual function call. But still it is valid solution. – Tomek Jun 2 '10 at 19:12
    
@Tomek, a real-life solution is always a tradeoff :-) – Péter Török Jun 3 '10 at 7:59
common_function(....)
{
}

f(vector<int>x,... )
{
    x.push_back(i);
    common_f(...);
}
g(DBConn& x, ....)
{
    x.DeleteRow(i);
    common_f(...);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1. This is usually the simplest way to do it. – Brian Jun 2 '10 at 13:59
    
This may work, except that I will need the following format: common_g() x.push_back(i) common_f() Not as simple. – user231536 Jun 2 '10 at 14:00
    
Also, you've got an extra set (or two) of parameter pushing. – Skizz Jun 2 '10 at 14:29
template<class T>
struct Adapter;

template<>
struct Adapter<vector<int> >
{
  static void execute(vector<int> &x, int i)
  {
    x.push_back(i);
  }
};

template<>
struct Adapter<DBConn>
{
  static void execute(DBConn &x, int i)
  {
    v.DeleteRow(i);
  }
};

template<class T>
void f(T &t, ...)
{
  ...
  Adapter<T>::execute(t, i);
  ...
}

OR:

template<class T>
struct adapter_traits;

template<>
struct adapter_traits<vector<int> >
{
  typedef void (vector<int>::*PMF)(int);
  static const PMF pmf = &vector<int>::push_back;
}

template<>
struct adapter_traits<DBConn>
{
  typedef void (DBConn::*PMF)(int);
  static const PMF pmf = &DBConn::DeleteRow;
}

template<class T>
void f(T &t, ...)
{
  ...
  (t.*adapter_traits<T>::pmf)(i);
  ...
}

NOTE: I might have some syntax wrong but you get the idea.

share|improve this answer

Yet another idea:

template<class T>
void f(T &t, void (T::*p)(int), ...)
{
  ...
  (t.*p)(i);
}

void g()
{
  DBConn x;
  vector<int> y;
  f(x, &DBConn::DeleteRow, ...);
  f(y, &vector<int>::push_back, ...);
}
share|improve this answer

Classic case for a functor:

#include <vector>
#include <DBConn.h>

// T:    The type of the object that is to be manipulated.
// A:    The type of the object that will do the manipulating
//       This may be a functor object or a function pointer.
//
// As this is a template function the template parameters will
// be deduced by the compiler at compile time.
template<typename T,typename A>
void action(T& obj,A const& action/*,....*/)
{
    // Do Stuff
    action(obj,5);
    // Do more Stuff
}

// Functor object
struct MyVectorAction
{
    // Just defines the operator()
    // Make sure it is a const method.
    // This does the unique bit of code. The parameters should be what you pass into action
    void operator()(std::vector<int>& data,int val) const   {data.push_back(val);}
};
void f(std::vector<int>& x)
{
    action(x,MyVectorAction()/*.... Params ....*/);
}


struct MyDBConnAction
{   void operator()(DBConn& data,int val) const   {data.DeleteRow(val);} };
void g(DBConn& x)
{
    action(x, MyDBConnAction());
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<int>    x;

    f(x);
}
share|improve this answer
    
It would be even better with C++0x and lambdas... You probably can avoid functors then. – Tomek Jun 2 '10 at 19:10

You could make a function that has the parameters of what you call (...), and this function can implement the logic that is the same in f() and g(). You could then change the implementation of f() and g() to call this new function instead of duplicating the logic. Be careful though if you're doing something duplicated before and after your unique lines. You may need two functions in that case. At any rate I think this would be preferable to having duplicated blocks of code.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.