Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Write a program that takes 3 integers separated by spaces and perform every single combination of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division operations possible and display the result with the operation combination used.

Example:

$./solution 1 2 3

Results in the following output

1+2+3 = 6

1-2-3 = -4

1*2*3 = 6

1/2/3 = 0 (integer answers only, round up at .5)

1*2-3 = -1

3*1+2 = 5

etc...

Order of operation rules apply, assume there will be no parenthesis used i.e. (3-1)*2 = 4 is not a combination, although you could implement this for "extra credit"

For results where a divide by 0 occurs simply return NaN

Edit: Permuting the input is required, i.e., if the input is 1 2 3, then 3*1*2 is a valid combination.

share|improve this question
5  
@Flash: Please also follow the spec described in meta.stackexchange.com/questions/24242/… –  KennyTM Jun 2 '10 at 18:30
    
It's not terribly clear that permuting the input numbers is also necessary. A clarification of that point might help. –  David Jun 2 '10 at 21:43
1  
I'm not sure, but isn't this a bit unfair because it benefits greatly from the builtin eval()'s of most interpreted languages? –  Alexander Gessler Jun 2 '10 at 22:55
1  
@Alexander: The C example shows that the preprocessor can be abused to do the eval. –  SztupY Jun 2 '10 at 23:20
    
@Alexander, @SztupY: Java's evilness can also be abused. Really! –  Pindatjuh Jun 2 '10 at 23:52
show 1 more comment

17 Answers 17

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Perl 130 chars

So long as external libraries are permitted:

use Algorithm::Permute"permute";
permute{for$x(@a=qw(+ - / *)){for$y(@a){$_="@ARGV";s/ /$x/;s/ /$y/;printf"
$_ = %.0f",eval}}}@ARGV

2nd newline is significant.

Without a module, and assuming that all three inputs are distinct, here's another solution:

      @n=&             ARGV;
      @o=(            q[+],
      "-",           q{/},         '*'     );;
      for$          {a}(@           n){   for
 $b(@n){for$c(@    {n}){             for $x( 
 @o){for$y(@o){   ($a-$  b)*($a-$c)*  ($b-$
 c)||next;$_=$a  .$x.$   b."$y$c";$%   =42
      /84+      eval;    print"",$_,  "$S="
      ,$S,     $%,$/                 }}} }};
      ;sub    ARGV{                 $S=   $".
      "";@   ARGV}                 ;1+     2+3
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for rubbing it in ;) –  zaf Jun 4 '10 at 8:04
1  
beautiful! very nice indeed. –  aidan Jun 4 '10 at 9:20
add comment

Java - 666 characters

Has also oneliners, luckily we have Eclipse and Netbeans automatic code-format! :-) Also implemented parenthesis (but also contains trivial ops)?

public class CodeGolf{static String[]o={"+","-","/","*"};static void p(N a,int b,N c,int d,N e,int i){System.out.printf("%s%s(%s%s%s) = %s\n",a,o[b],c,o[d],e,new N(a,b,new N(c,d,e)));}public static void main(String[]v){N[]n={new N(v[0]),new N(v[1]),new N(v[2])};for(int i=0,j=0,k=0,l=0,m=0;m<3;i++,j+=i==4?1:0,i%=4,k+=j==4?1:0,j%=4,l+=k==3?1:0,k%=3,m+=l==3?1:0,l%=3){p(n[k],i,n[l],j,n[m],0);}}static class N{Double v;N(String s){v=v.parseDouble(s);}N(N a,int o,N b){if(a.v==null||b.v==null)return;double x=b.v, y=a.v; switch(o){case 0:x=-x;case 1:v=y-x;return;case 3:v=y*x;x=0;case 2:if(x!=0)v=y/x;}}public String toString(){return v!=null?""+Math.round(v):"NaN";}}}

Expanded, formatted, version with comments:

public class CodeGolf {

// operators
static String[] o = {"+", "-", "/", "*"};

// print
static void p(N a, int b, N c, int d, N e, int i) {
    System.out.printf("%s%s(%s%s%s) = %s\n", a, o[b], c, o[d], e,
            new N(a, b, new N(c, d, e))); // calculate
}

public static void main(String[] v) {
    N[] n = {new N(v[0]), new N(v[1]), new N(v[2])};
    // Nested for-loops? Nah, too much code!
    // Conditional operator, modulus is way cooler.
    for (int i = 0, j = 0,
             k = 0, l = 0, m = 0; m < 3; i++,
                                    j += i == 4 ? 1 : 0,
                                         i %= 4,
                               k += j == 4 ? 1 : 0,
                                    j %= 4,
                          l += k == 3 ? 1 : 0,
                               k %= 3,
                     m += l == 3 ? 1 : 0,
                          l %= 3) {
        p(n[k], i, n[l], j, n[m], 0);
    }
}

// number wrapper
static class N {

    Double v;

    // parse input
    N(String s) {
        v = v.parseDouble(s);
    }

    // calculate input
    N(N a, int o, N b) {
        // NaN's should fall through
        if (a.v == null || b.v == null) {
            return;
        }
        double x = b.v, y = a.v;
        // operator execution
        switch (o) {
            case 0:
                x = -x;
                // fall through; y + x = y - (-x)
            case 1:
                v = y - x;
                return; // break would make it 665 characters, not as cool
            case 3:
                v = y * x;
                x = 0;
                // fall through; no return needed
            case 2:
                if (x != 0) {
                    v = y / x;
                }
                // will NaN because v = null if x = 0
        }
    }

    // rounding and NaN
    public String toString() {
        return v != null ? "" + Math.round(v) : "NaN";
    }
}

}

Iterate on both operators (4 * 4) and permute on operands, twice (3! * 2) makes (4 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 2 = 192 possiblities).

+/- 2.5 hours :-) Enjoy!

share|improve this answer
6  
evil laugh \m/ –  serg Jun 2 '10 at 21:49
2  
+1 for the nice char count xD –  fortran Jun 3 '10 at 9:32
17  
That's the most evil for loop I've ever seen! –  Esko Jun 3 '10 at 9:49
4  
+1 for that for loop alone. –  Beska Jun 3 '10 at 20:49
1  
Will reading it backwards reveal evil meaning? –  cand Jun 7 '10 at 10:46
add comment

Delphi - 838 747 characters

Single Line Version (Original)

program p;{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}uses SysUtils;type g=Integer;function a(b,c:g):g;begin a:=b+c;end;function s(b,c:g):g;begin s:=b-c;end;function m(b,c:g):g;begin m:=b*c;end;function d(b,c:g):g;begin d:=b div c;end;type t=function(b,c:g):g;r=record f:t;c:char;p:boolean;end;procedure q(l:Array of g;w,e:r);var b:String;x,y,z:g;begin for x:=0 to 2 do for y:=0 to 2 do for z:=0 to 2 do if not((x=y)or(x=z)or(y=z))then begin try if(w.p)or not(w.p xor e.p)then b:=IntToStr(e.f(w.f(l[x],l[y]),l[z]))else b:=IntToStr(w.f(l[x],e.f(l[y],l[z])));except b:='NaN';end;writeln(l[x],w.c,l[y],e.c,l[z],'=',b);end;end;const O:Array[0..3]of r=((f:a;c:'+';p:false),(f:s;c:'-';p:false),(f:m;c:'*';p :true),(f:d;c:'/';p:true));var L:Array[0..2] of g;I,J:g; begin for I:=0 to 2 do L[I]:=StrToInt(ParamStr(I+1));for I:=0 to 3 do for J:=0 to 3 do q(l,o[I],o[J]);end.

Single Line Version (Shortened to 747 Characters)

program p;{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}uses SysUtils,Math;type g=integer;t=function(b,c:g):g;r=record f:t;p:boolean;end;function a(b,c:g):g;begin a:=b+c end;function s(b,c:g):g;begin s:=b-c end;function m(b,c:g):g;begin m:=b*c end;function d(b,c:g):g;begin d:=b div c end;const f=true;u=false;n=[1..4];b=[1..3];c='+-*/';O:Array[1..4]of r=((f:a;p:f),(f:s;p:f),(f:m;p:u),(f:d;p:u));var l: Array[1..3]of g;I,J,x,y,z:g;w,e:r;begin for I in b do l[I]:=StrToInt(ParamStr(I));for I in n do for J in n do for x in b do for y in b do for z in b do if not((x=y)or(x=z)or(y=z))then begin w:=O[I];e:=O[J];write(l[x],c[I],l[y],c[J],l[z],'=');try writeLn(ifthen(w.p or not(w.p xor e.p),e.f(w.f(l[x],l[y]),l[z]),w.f(l[x],e.f(l[y],l[z]))))except writeln('NaN')end;end;end.

Formated:

program p;
{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}
uses SysUtils;

type
  g = Integer;

function a(b, c: g): g;
begin
  a := b + c;
end;

function s(b, c: g): g;
begin
  s := b - c;
end;

function m(b, c: g): g;
begin
  m := b * c;
end;

function d(b, c: g): g;
begin
  d := b div c;
end;

type
  t = function(b, c: g): g;

  r = record
    f: t;
    c: char;
    p: boolean;
  end;

procedure q(l: Array of g; w, e: r);
var
  b: String;
  x, y, z: g;
begin
  for x := 0 to 2 do
    for y := 0 to 2 do
      for z := 0 to 2 do
        if not((x = y) or (x = z) or (y = z)) then
        begin
          try
            if (w.p) or not(w.p xor e.p) then
              b := IntToStr(e.f(w.f(l[x], l[y]), l[z]))
            else
              b := IntToStr(w.f(l[x], e.f(l[y], l[z])));
          except
            b := 'NaN';
          end;
          writeln(l[x], w.c, l[y], e.c, l[z], '=', b);
        end;
end;

const
  O: Array [0..3] of r = ((f: a; c: '+'; p: false), (f: s; c: '-'; p: false),
                            (f: m; c: '*'; p: true), (f: d; c: '/'; p: true));

var
  l: Array [0..2] of g;
  I, J: g;
begin

  for I := 0 to 2 do
    l[I] := StrToInt(ParamStr(I + 1));
  for I := 0 to 3 do
    for J := 0 to 3 do
      q(l, O[I], O[J]);

end.

This is by far the ugliest code I have ever written.

share|improve this answer
    
Don't worry, I've made it even worse to get rid of 91 characters :) –  Wouter van Nifterick Jun 5 '10 at 1:06
    
You can still remove the "program" line as it is not needed by the compiler and get rid of the "APPTYPE" as it can be given as a compiler switch in the command line. –  Uwe Raabe Jun 6 '10 at 8:23
add comment

J, 75 55 characters.

Outputs rational numbers, not integers.

(],"1'=',"1 ":@x:@".)((' ',>@{.),@,.":"0@>@{:)"1>{(,{;~'+-*%');<<"1(i.!3)A.

Old version which didn't permute the input (was 55 characters)

(],"1'=',"1 ":@x:@".)(>,{;~'+-*%')(' 'I.@:E.s)}"1 s=:":

Example (note that J's order of operations is right-to-left):

   (],"1'=',"1 ":@x:@".)((' ',>@{.),@,.":"0@>@{:)"1>{(,{;~'+-*%');<<"1(i.!3)A.1 2 3
 1+2+3=6   
 1+3+2=6   
 2+1+3=6   
 2+3+1=6   
 3+1+2=6   
 3+2+1=6   

 1+2-3=0   
 1+3-2=2   
 2+1-3=0   
 2+3-1=4   
 3+1-2=2   
 3+2-1=4   

 1+2*3=7   
 1+3*2=7   
 2+1*3=5   
 2+3*1=5   
 3+1*2=5   
 3+2*1=5   

 1+2%3=5r3 
 1+3%2=5r2 
 2+1%3=7r3 
 2+3%1=5   
 3+1%2=7r2 
 3+2%1=5   

 1-2+3=_4  
 1-3+2=_4  
 2-1+3=_2  
 2-3+1=_2  
 3-1+2=0   
 3-2+1=0   

 1-2-3=2   
 1-3-2=0   
 2-1-3=4   
 2-3-1=0   
 3-1-2=4   
 3-2-1=2   

 1-2*3=_5  
 1-3*2=_5  
 2-1*3=_1  
 2-3*1=_1  
 3-1*2=1   
 3-2*1=1   

 1-2%3=1r3 
 1-3%2=_1r2
 2-1%3=5r3 
 2-3%1=_1  
 3-1%2=5r2 
 3-2%1=1   

 1*2+3=5   
 1*3+2=5   
 2*1+3=8   
 2*3+1=8   
 3*1+2=9   
 3*2+1=9   

 1*2-3=_1  
 1*3-2=1   
 2*1-3=_4  
 2*3-1=4   
 3*1-2=_3  
 3*2-1=3   

 1*2*3=6   
 1*3*2=6   
 2*1*3=6   
 2*3*1=6   
 3*1*2=6   
 3*2*1=6   

 1*2%3=2r3 
 1*3%2=3r2 
 2*1%3=2r3 
 2*3%1=6   
 3*1%2=3r2 
 3*2%1=6   

 1%2+3=1r5 
 1%3+2=1r5 
 2%1+3=1r2 
 2%3+1=1r2 
 3%1+2=1   
 3%2+1=1   

 1%2-3=_1  
 1%3-2=1   
 2%1-3=_1  
 2%3-1=1   
 3%1-2=_3  
 3%2-1=3   

 1%2*3=1r6 
 1%3*2=1r6 
 2%1*3=2r3 
 2%3*1=2r3 
 3%1*2=3r2 
 3%2*1=3r2 

 1%2%3=3r2 
 1%3%2=2r3 
 2%1%3=6   
 2%3%1=2r3 
 3%1%2=6   
 3%2%1=3r2 
share|improve this answer
4  
J wins again. * yawn * –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jun 2 '10 at 21:49
    
Integer Answers only round up at .5 –  Robert Love Jun 3 '10 at 16:18
add comment

C

600 bytes on disk with DOS line endings.

#define C B a,B b
#define D(N,O)B N(C){return a O b;}
#define E(A,B,C)i=A;j=B;k=C;X(m,p)X(m,m)X(t,t)X(d,t)X(t,d)X(d,d)Y(m,p)Y(p,p)Y(p,t)Y(p,d)Y(m,t)Y(m,d)
#define U"%.0f"
#define P(S,T)printf(U Z(S)U Z(T)U"="U"\n",v[i],v[j],v[k],
#define p +
#define m -
#define t *
#define d /
#define X(S,T)P(S,T)f##S(f##T(v[i],v[j]),v[k]));
#define Y(S,T)P(S,T)f##S(v[i],f##T(v[j],v[k])));
#define Z(A)#A
typedef double B;D(fp,+)D(fm,-)D(ft,*)B fd(C){return b?(int)(a/b+.5):-0.0;}main(int i,char*b[]){int j,k;B v[3]={atoi(b[1]),atoi(b[2]),atoi(b[3])};E(0,1,2)E(0,2,1)E(1,0,2)E(1,2,0)E(2,0,1)E(2,1,0)}

C doesn't seem to have NaN literals, so you get -0 if there's anything wrong rather than that.

However I think it fits the bill otherwise. (Note that the data type is double so that if it DID have a NaN in there, it will get printed out as such by printf.)

share|improve this answer
7  
+1 for preprocessor abuse. But can you use atoi without a #include? Or indeed printf? My gcc doesn't like it. –  walkytalky Jun 2 '10 at 22:17
    
Well they're undeclared, but that's fine, as both actually return int and the supplied arguments match what the routines expect. What errors do you get? (For best results, I guess compile as C89, turn off warnings about undeclared functions; I don't use gcc, so I couldn't say. Despite appearances though, there's actually nothing tricky about it...) –  please delete me Jun 2 '10 at 22:52
    
You're right, they're only warnings. For line 4: "missing whitespace after the macro name"; for line 13: "incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘printf’" The resulting executable runs fine. –  walkytalky Jun 3 '10 at 21:08
add comment

Javascript, 169 characters

(not counting unnecessary line breaks and indentation)

Edit: Now with input permutation

o=" ";i=i.split(o);z="+-*/";for(y=0;y<27;y++)for(x=0;x<16;x++){a=y/9|0;b=(y/3|0)%3;c=y%3;if(a!=b&&a!=c&&b!=c){s=i[a]+z[x/4|0]+i[b]+z[x%4]+i[c];o+=s+"="+~~(eval(s)+.5);}}

With indentation:

o=" ";
i=i.split(o);
z="+-*/";
for(y=0;y<27;y++)
for(x=0;x<16;x++)
{
    a=y/9|0;
    b=(y/3|0)%3;
    c=y%3;
    if(a!=b&&a!=c&&b!=c)
    {
        s=i[a]+z[x/4|0]+i[b]+z[x%4]+i[c];
        o+=s+"="+~~(eval(s)+.5);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
you could drop unnecessary formatting (HTML-wise) and lose a few more characters. –  Malfist Jun 2 '10 at 19:01
2  
but where does it do permutation for the input? –  SztupY Jun 2 '10 at 19:32
1  
Well, part of the complexity of the problem is to evaluate the expression. If you use a built-in function to do it, you're missing half of the problem. It's also an unfair advantage over languages that don't have an eval function. See this discussion : meta.stackexchange.com/questions/24242/… –  Thomas Levesque Jun 3 '10 at 15:10
3  
Um? What? Using features of a particular language is unfair? Why bother selecting a language at all, if you can only use the features common to them all? The whole POINT is to creatively select a language and approach to use the minimum number of characters. –  Beska Jun 3 '10 at 20:46
1  
I think the question itself is somewhat in violation of that quality point (no easy built-in solution), but that doesn't invalidate the answers. –  Eric Mickelsen Jun 3 '10 at 20:51
show 5 more comments

Python - 125 175 177 characters:

(not now counting indentation)
Added command-line input, no more single-digit/non-zero restriction, works with zero (NaN)

import sys
from itertools import permutations as p
for i,j,k in p(sys.argv[1:4],3):
    for x,y in p('+-*/'*2,2):
        s=i+x+j+'.'+y+k
        try:e=eval(s)
        except:e='NaN'
        print s,'=',e

Still No more truncates instead of rounding up at 0.5

share|improve this answer
2  
input is hard-coded here –  SztupY Jun 2 '10 at 19:06
14  
I don't think indentation should be omitted, since they're significant in Python. –  KennyTM Jun 2 '10 at 22:00
1  
-1: cannot handle 0 in its input in its current form (or values with more then one digit, e.g. 15) –  ChristopheD Jun 3 '10 at 0:51
    
It is actually 134 chars when you count (you have to!) new lines and indentation. Does not work in python <2.6. Also the 3 values are hardcoded and can only be single-digit. –  Nas Banov Jun 3 '10 at 9:49
    
Criticisms addressed :) –  tzaman Jun 3 '10 at 11:48
show 3 more comments

Haskell, 221 chars

Argh!!, imports takes 50 chars.

import Data.List
import System
import Text.Printf
o=zip[(+),(-),(*),(/)]"+-*/"
main=do v<-getArgs;sequence[printf"%.0g%c(%.0g%c%.0g)=%.0g\n"x h y i z$f x$g y z|(f,h)<-o,(g,i)<-o,[x,y,z]<-permutations(map read v::[Float])]

getArgs needs System, printf needs Text.Printf, permutations needs Data.List, the [[Float]] is needed because / needs an instance of Fractional. We can't use div because it will throw when divide by zero.

Basically this just iterates over all possible combinations of operators and permutations of input arguments and print the result.

The three %.0g can be replaced by %g to remove 6 chars, but the result will look like 1.0/(2.0*3.0)=0 which is ugly.


~$ ./a.out 0 4 9
0+(4+9)=13
4+(0+9)=13
9+(4+0)=13
4+(9+0)=13
9+(0+4)=13
0+(9+4)=13
0+(4-9)=-5
4+(0-9)=-5
9+(4-0)=13
4+(9-0)=13
9+(0-4)=5
0+(9-4)=5
0+(4*9)=36
4+(0*9)=4
9+(4*0)=9
4+(9*0)=4
9+(0*4)=9
0+(9*4)=36
0+(4/9)=0
4+(0/9)=4
9+(4/0)=Infinity
4+(9/0)=Infinity
9+(0/4)=9
0+(9/4)=2
0-(4+9)=-13
4-(0+9)=-5
9-(4+0)=5
4-(9+0)=-5
9-(0+4)=5
0-(9+4)=-13
0-(4-9)=5
4-(0-9)=13
9-(4-0)=5
4-(9-0)=-5
9-(0-4)=13
0-(9-4)=-5
0-(4*9)=-36
4-(0*9)=4
9-(4*0)=9
4-(9*0)=4
9-(0*4)=9
0-(9*4)=-36
0-(4/9)=-0
4-(0/9)=4
9-(4/0)=-Infinity
4-(9/0)=-Infinity
9-(0/4)=9
0-(9/4)=-2
0*(4+9)=0
4*(0+9)=36
9*(4+0)=36
4*(9+0)=36
9*(0+4)=36
0*(9+4)=0
0*(4-9)=-0
4*(0-9)=-36
9*(4-0)=36
4*(9-0)=36
9*(0-4)=-36
0*(9-4)=0
0*(4*9)=0
4*(0*9)=0
9*(4*0)=0
4*(9*0)=0
9*(0*4)=0
0*(9*4)=0
0*(4/9)=0
4*(0/9)=0
9*(4/0)=Infinity
4*(9/0)=Infinity
9*(0/4)=0
0*(9/4)=0
0/(4+9)=0
4/(0+9)=0
9/(4+0)=2
4/(9+0)=0
9/(0+4)=2
0/(9+4)=0
0/(4-9)=-0
4/(0-9)=-0
9/(4-0)=2
4/(9-0)=0
9/(0-4)=-2
0/(9-4)=0
0/(4*9)=0
4/(0*9)=Infinity
9/(4*0)=Infinity
4/(9*0)=Infinity
9/(0*4)=Infinity
0/(9*4)=0
0/(4/9)=0
4/(0/9)=Infinity
9/(4/0)=0
4/(9/0)=0
9/(0/4)=Infinity
0/(9/4)=0
share|improve this answer
add comment

Bash shell, 126 - 169 - 156 - 140 characters

Should work in any semi-modern Bash I think (tested with GNU bash, 3.2.48(1) x86_64-apple-build).

Handles division by zero (Nan case).

All suggestions and comments welcome!

for a in $@;do
s+={`echo $@|tr ' ' ,`}{+,-,*,/};done
for i in `eval echo ${s::${#s}-9}`;do
[[ $i == */0* ]]&&y=Nan||y=$[$i];echo $i=$y;done

Supply parameters via command line:

./combinate.sh 5 0 12

share|improve this answer
1  
sed 's/ /,/g' can be reduced to tr ' ' ',' –  dreamlax Jun 3 '10 at 9:51
    
@dreamlax: good catch, thanks! (shaves off 5 characters when using tr ' ' ,) –  ChristopheD Jun 3 '10 at 9:56
add comment

Ruby, 105 110 142 114 characters

o=%w{+ - * /};[*ARGV.permutation].product(o.product o).map{|x,y|e=x.zip(y)*"";p"#{e}=#{eval(e)rescue:N}"}

Usage

ruby prog.rb 1 2 3

Explanation

# o = ["+", "-", "*", "/"]
o=%w{+ - * /};
# ARGV = array of numbers. Generate all permutations, and apply splat operator
[*ARGV.permutation]
# Generate cartesian product of all permuted numbers and operators 
# There will be 16 operator permutations, and 6 number permutations giving a 
# total of 96 elements
.product(o.product o)
# For each of the 96 pairs, merge the operators and numbers into 1 array.
# ex - [1,2,3].zip(["+", "-"]) gives [[1, '+'], [2, '-'], [3, nil]]
# then convert the array to string by multiplying with "" => "1+2-3"
.each{|x,y|e=x.zip(y)*"";
# print output and eval result. On exception return infinity - ∞
p"#{e}=#{eval(e)rescue:N}"}

Output

1+2+3=6
1+2-3=0
1+2*3=7
1+2/3=1
1-2+3=2
1-2-3=-4
1-2*3=-5
1-2/3=1
1*2+3=5
1*2-3=-1
1*2*3=6
1*2/3=0
1/2+3=3
1/2-3=-3
1/2*3=0
1/2/3=0
1+3+2=6
1+3-2=2
1+3*2=7
1+3/2=2
1-3+2=0
1-3-2=-4
1-3*2=-5
1-3/2=0
1*3+2=5
1*3-2=1
1*3*2=6
1*3/2=1
1/3+2=2
1/3-2=-2
1/3*2=0
1/3/2=0
2+1+3=6
2+1-3=0
2+1*3=5
2+1/3=2
2-1+3=4
2-1-3=-2
2-1*3=-1
2-1/3=2
2*1+3=5
2*1-3=-1
2*1*3=6
2*1/3=0
2/1+3=5
2/1-3=-1
2/1*3=6
2/1/3=0
2+3+1=6
2+3-1=4
2+3*1=5
2+3/1=5
2-3+1=0
2-3-1=-2
2-3*1=-1
2-3/1=-1
2*3+1=7
2*3-1=5
2*3*1=6
2*3/1=6
2/3+1=1
2/3-1=-1
2/3*1=0
2/3/1=0
3+1+2=6
3+1-2=2
3+1*2=5
3+1/2=3
3-1+2=4
3-1-2=0
3-1*2=1
3-1/2=3
3*1+2=5
3*1-2=1
3*1*2=6
3*1/2=1
3/1+2=5
3/1-2=1
3/1*2=6
3/1/2=1
3+2+1=6
3+2-1=4
3+2*1=5
3+2/1=5
3-2+1=2
3-2-1=0
3-2*1=1
3-2/1=1
3*2+1=7
3*2-1=5
3*2*1=6
3*2/1=6
3/2+1=2
3/2-1=0
3/2*1=1
3/2/1=1
share|improve this answer
add comment

Perl - 76 characters

$a=1;$b=2;$c=3;
warn eval for map{$x=$_;map"$a$x$b$_$c",@a}@a=split//,'+-/*';
share|improve this answer
    
Nice job. How about the 0.5 rounding and format printing now? –  Zaid Jun 2 '10 at 19:17
    
And not hard-coding the inputs. (Costs 2 chars I think.) –  walkytalky Jun 2 '10 at 19:23
    
:) with rounding and user input, 85: ($a,$b,$c)=@ARGV;map{$x=$_;map printf("%.0f\n",eval"$a$x$b$_$c"),@a}@a=split//,"+-/*" –  aidan Jun 2 '10 at 19:26
    
how does it permute the input? –  SztupY Jun 2 '10 at 19:33
    
There's printing the string expression first. Also, this doesn't permute the numbers, which the spec requires. –  walkytalky Jun 2 '10 at 19:37
show 1 more comment

Lua - 240 characters

Note: Prints 1.#INF and -1.#INF instead of NaN.

a,b,c=...o="+-*/"f=function(...)g=table.concat({...})loadstring('x='..g)()print(g..' = '..math.floor(x+.5))end for d in o:gmatch(".")do for e in o:gmatch(".")do f(a,d,b,e,c)f(a,d,c,e,b)f(b,d,a,e,c)f(b,d,c,e,a)f(c,d,a,e,b)f(c,d,b,e,a)end end

Output

5+0+13 = 18
5+13+0 = 18
0+5+13 = 18
0+13+5 = 18
13+5+0 = 18
13+0+5 = 18
5+0-13 = -8
5+13-0 = 18
0+5-13 = -8
0+13-5 = 8
13+5-0 = 18
13+0-5 = 8
5+0*13 = 5
5+13*0 = 5
0+5*13 = 65
0+13*5 = 65
13+5*0 = 13
13+0*5 = 13
5+0/13 = 5
5+13/0 = 1.#INF
0+5/13 = 0
0+13/5 = 3
13+5/0 = 1.#INF
13+0/5 = 13
5-0+13 = 18
5-13+0 = -8
0-5+13 = 8
0-13+5 = -8
13-5+0 = 8
13-0+5 = 18
5-0-13 = -8
5-13-0 = -8
0-5-13 = -18
0-13-5 = -18
13-5-0 = 8
13-0-5 = 8
5-0*13 = 5
5-13*0 = 5
0-5*13 = -65
0-13*5 = -65
13-5*0 = 13
13-0*5 = 13
5-0/13 = 5
5-13/0 = -1.#INF
0-5/13 = 0
0-13/5 = -3
13-5/0 = -1.#INF
13-0/5 = 13
5*0+13 = 13
5*13+0 = 65
0*5+13 = 13
0*13+5 = 5
13*5+0 = 65
13*0+5 = 5
5*0-13 = -13
5*13-0 = 65
0*5-13 = -13
0*13-5 = -5
13*5-0 = 65
13*0-5 = -5
5*0*13 = 0
5*13*0 = 0
0*5*13 = 0
0*13*5 = 0
13*5*0 = 0
13*0*5 = 0
5*0/13 = 0
5*13/0 = 1.#INF
0*5/13 = 0
0*13/5 = 0
13*5/0 = 1.#INF
13*0/5 = 0
5/0+13 = 1.#INF
5/13+0 = 0
0/5+13 = 13
0/13+5 = 5
13/5+0 = 3
13/0+5 = 1.#INF
5/0-13 = 1.#INF
5/13-0 = 0
0/5-13 = -13
0/13-5 = -5
13/5-0 = 3
13/0-5 = 1.#INF
5/0*13 = 1.#INF
5/13*0 = 0
0/5*13 = 0
0/13*5 = 0
13/5*0 = 0
13/0*5 = 1.#INF
5/0/13 = 1.#INF
5/13/0 = 1.#INF
0/5/13 = 0
0/13/5 = 0
13/5/0 = 1.#INF
13/0/5 = 1.#INF
share|improve this answer
add comment

F#: 280 chars, incl. newlines

The unreadable version:

let q s=System.Data.DataTable().Compute(s,"")|>string|>float
let e(a,b,c)=let o=["+";"-";"*";"/"]in for x in o do for y in o do let s=a+x+b+y+c in printfn"%s=%.0f"s (q s)
[<EntryPoint>]let p(A:_[])=(for i=0 to 2 do let p,q,r=A.[i],A.[(i+1)%3],A.[(i+2)%3]in e(p,q,r);e(p,r,q));0

The tl;dr version:

//This program needs to be compiled as a console project
//It needs additional references to System.Data and System.Xml

//This function evaluates a string expression to a float
//It (ab)uses the Compute method of System.Data.DataTable which acts 
//as .Net's own little eval()
let q s =
    //the answer is an object
    System.Data.DataTable().Compute(s,"")
    //so convert it to a string and then parse it as a float
    |> string
    |> float

//This function first generates all 6 permutations of a 3-tuple of strings
//and then inserts all operator combination between the entries
//Finally it prints the expression and its evaluated result
let e (a,b,c) =
    let o = ["+";"-";"*";"/"] 
    //a double loop to get all operator combos
    for x in o 
        do for y in o do 
            let s=a+x+b+y+c //z is expression to evaluate
            //print the result as expression = result, 
            //the %.0f formatter takes care of rounding
            printfn "%s=%.0f" s (q s)

//This is the entry point definition. 
//A is the array of command line args as strings.
[<EntryPoint>]
let p(A:_[]) = 
    //Generate all permutations: 
    //for each index i: 
    //  put the i-th element at the front and add the two remaining elements
    //  once in original order and once swapped. Voila: 6 permutations.
    for i=0 to 2 do 
        let p,q,r = A.[i], A.[(i+1)%3], A.[(i+2)%3] 
        e(p,q,r) //evaluate and print "p + <op> + q + <another op> + r"
        e(p,r,q) //evaluate and print "p + <op> + r + <another op> + q"
    0 //the execution of the program apparently needs to return an integer

Example output:

> ConsoleApplication1 1 2 0
1+2+0=3
1+2-0=3
1+2*0=1
1+2/0=Infinity
1-2+0=-1
1-2-0=-1
1-2*0=1
1-2/0=-Infinity
1*2+0=2
1*2-0=2
1*2*0=0
1*2/0=Infinity
1/2+0=1
1/2-0=1
1/2*0=0
1/2/0=Infinity
1+0+2=3
1+0-2=-1
1+0*2=1
1+0/2=1
...
share|improve this answer
add comment

OK, it's not really short, but I post it anyway, just for fun...

Note that unlike most other answers, this one doesn't use eval since it's not available in C# (it would be much shorter with it)

C#, 729 chars

using System;using System.Linq;using w=System.Double;class Op{public char c;public int p;public Func<w,w,w>f;}class Program{static void Main(string[]p){var nb=p.Select((n,i)=>new{n=w.Parse(n),i});var op=new[]{new Op{c='+',p=0,f=(a,b)=>a+b},new Op{c='-',p=0,f=(a,b)=>a-b},new Op{c='*',p=1,f=(a,b)=>a*b},new Op{c='/',p=1,f=(a,b)=>a/b},};Func<Op,Op,Func<w,w,w,w>>fg=(o1,o2)=>(x,y,z)=>o1.p>=o2.p?o2.f(o1.f(x,y),z):o1.f(x,o2.f(y,z));Func<w,w>nan=d=>w.IsInfinity(d)?w.NaN:d;var res=from o1 in op from o2 in op from x in nb from y in nb where x.i!=y.i from z in nb where z.i!=x.i&&z.i!=y.i let r=nan(fg(o1,o2)(x.n,y.n,z.n))select string.Format("{0}{1}{2}{3}{4}={5:F0}",x.n,o1.c,y.n,o2.c,z.n,r);res.ToList().ForEach(Console.WriteLine);}}

Expanded version

using System;
using System.Linq;
using w=System.Double;

// Operator class
// c = character
// p = priority
// f = function
class Op { public char c; public int p; public Func<w, w, w> f; }
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // Parse the input and associate each number with its index
        var nb = args.Select((n, i) => new { n = w.Parse(n), i });

        // Operators definition
        var op = new[]
        {
            new Op { c = '+', p = 0, f = (a, b) => a + b },
            new Op { c = '-', p = 0, f = (a, b) => a - b },
            new Op { c = '*', p = 1, f = (a, b) => a * b },
            new Op { c = '/', p = 1, f = (a, b) => a / b },
        };

        // Function generator to compute the result ; handles operator priority
        Func<Op, Op, Func<w, w, w, w>> fg =
            (o1, o2) =>
                (x, y, z) =>
                    o1.p >= o2.p
                        ? o2.f(o1.f(x, y), z)
                        : o1.f(x, o2.f(y, z));

        // Converts +/- Infinity to NaN
        Func<w, w> nan = d => w.IsInfinity(d) ? w.NaN : d;

        // Results
        var res =
            // Combinations of 2 operators
            from o1 in op
            from o2 in op
            // Permutations of numbers
            from x in nb
            from y in nb
            where x.i != y.i
            from z in nb
            where z.i != x.i && z.i != y.i
            // Compute result
            let r = nan(fg(o1, o2)(x.n, y.n, z.n))
            // Format output
            select string.Format("{0} {1} {2} {3} {4} = {5:F0}", x.n, o1.c, y.n, o2.c, z.n, r);

        res.ToList().ForEach(Console.WriteLine);
    }
}

Who said you can't do functional programming in C# ? ;)


EDIT : fixed to make it work with duplicate numbers

share|improve this answer
1  
This isn't valid C#... it must work out of the box. –  Dykam Jun 3 '10 at 5:41
    
@Dykam: fixed it. didn't test it though. –  Mauricio Scheffer Jun 3 '10 at 6:23
3  
C# = Java++ ;-) –  Mauricio Scheffer Jun 3 '10 at 6:24
    
Is it possible to remove the space in Func<w,w,w> f? Then it has the same length as Java ;) –  KennyTM Jun 3 '10 at 8:12
    
@Mauricio Scheffer, thanks for the fix. I tested in LinqPad so I omitted the usual program structure... Regarding your second comment, you can add a few more '+' signs ;). @KennyTM, yes it is possible, I removed it. Thanks ! –  Thomas Levesque Jun 3 '10 at 8:56
show 2 more comments

Ruby

(reads from argument list and returns NaN if not divisible)

(would be only the last line if ruby had a permutation library)

class Array
  def perm(n = size)
    if size < n or n < 0
    elsif n == 0
      yield([])
    else
      self[1..-1].perm(n - 1) do |x|
        (0...n).each do |i|
          yield(x[0...i] + [first] + x[i..-1])
        end
      end
      self[1..-1].perm(n) do |x|
        yield(x)
      end
    end
  end
end

ARGV.perm(3){|a,b,c| "++//**--".split(//).perm(2){ |d,e| x=a+d+b+e+c;puts "#{x} = #{eval(x)}" rescue puts "#{x} = NaN"} }
share|improve this answer
1  
sigh, it has: ruby-doc.org/core-1.9/classes/Array.html#M000482 –  samuil Jun 3 '10 at 5:54
    
yeah, but that's ruby 1.9 –  SztupY Jun 3 '10 at 7:05
add comment

Python (171 characters)

This avoids shortfalls of previous python solution (hard-coded 1-digit numbers only, dependency on newer libraries). Reads from stdin - if you want cmdline, replace "raw_input().split()" with "sys.argv[1:4]"

x=raw_input().split()
for e in[x[i/3]+p+x[i%3]+'.'+q+x[3-i/3-i%3]for i in range(9)if i%4for p in'+-*/'for q in'+-*/']:
    try:r=round(eval(e))
    except:r='NaN'
    print e,'=',r

ps. decreased to 147->138
pps. changed calculations from int to float w/rounding, 138->153
ppps. added support for /0=NaN, 153->179
pppps. decreased 179->177 ppppps. sacrificed beauty for brevity, 177->171

share|improve this answer
    
What is that <> operator in Python? –  KennyTM Jun 3 '10 at 10:22
    
probably not equal –  user350034 Jun 3 '10 at 12:28
    
yeah, <> and != mean the same in Python, "not equal". "!=" is C-like and used also in Java, Perl etc. "<>" is Basic-like and also used in Pascal, SQL, *ML etc –  Nas Banov Jun 3 '10 at 18:51
    
Doesn't work for zero division. ;) –  tzaman Jun 3 '10 at 20:07
    
now it does work for /0. AND it rounds correctly. ...and does not use some newly fangled library function :-D –  Nas Banov Jun 3 '10 at 20:44
add comment

F#, 584 bytes

(includes necessary indentation and LFs)

let d a b=if b=0.0 then nan else a/b
let o=["*",((*),1);"+",((+),0);"/",(d,1);"-",((-),0)]
let b=double
let rec z=function|[x]->[x,[]]|x::s->(x,s)::List.map(fun(y,l)->y,x::l)(z s)
let rec p=function|[]->[[]]|l->z l|>List.collect(fun(x,r)->p r|>List.map(fun l->x::l))
let f=fst
let e o p x y z=if snd o<snd p then (f o)x ((f p) y z) else (f p)((f o) x y)z
[<EntryPoint>]let m a=
for i in p(Seq.toList a)do
 let x,y,z=b i.[0],b i.[1],b i.[2]
 for j in[for j in o do for k in o do yield[j;k]]do
  printfn "%.0f%s%.0f%s%.0f = %.0f" x (f j.[0])y (f j.[1])z (e(snd j.[0])(snd j.[1])x y z)
0

Kudos to kvb for his/her permutations function.

It wound up being quite similar in structure to Thomas' C# solution (maybe because his solution is already quite functional)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.